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I've a 1 year old Saanen who is extremely lopsided. She has been that way since first showing her udder. Now the kid came last night and milks off the very small side which milks down to nothing. Will the kid transfer to the full udder? What should I do . . . milk the larger udder . . . feed in a bottle . . . don't want to do that as I work away from home? Any suggestions out there. I have not tested for mastitis as she has been this way since first showing.
 

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You need to get the full side milked out ASAP... And depending on how long it's been since the kid was born, you should save and freeze the colostrum for any future needs.

Train the kid to nurse both sides by taping the teat it uses now, milk her out 2-3 times a day to keep her production even.
 

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Agree. You need to milk that side out. When was the kid born? If it was within a day, I would save the colostrum. You may need to milk her out regularly.
 

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Test her. Does the full side seem hot or painful? Lumpy? It may be congested even if she doesn't have mastitis. She's probably normal, but you'll need to milk that side or as stated train the kid by partially milking the side so he can get a good grip and taping the other side. Single kids are a PITBackside that way.
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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NEVER milk out a doe who has just freshen. You can cause what is known as milk fever. That is where the body rushes to make more milk, sucking the calcium outta the does resources and sending her body into shock. Often only fixed by a vet and a shot of something loaded with calcium. Never milk more then 1/3 of the does milk in the first 2-3 days.

I suggest never leaving a single on a doe. Though the first couple of weeks the kid cant take enough to matter so we leave em on for that time frame and then pull and bottle feed them. As to the problem why its uneven, Lord there are ton of different things it could be. Good luck
 

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Goat Girl
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Milking out the doe does not cause milk fever. Milk fever (hypocalcemia) is caused when the doe did not receive adequate calcium in her diet during pregnancy and prior to kidding. This is why you want to feed some form of alfalfa, especially to dairy goats who are naturally higher milk producers. Every single one of my does gets milked out all the way right after kidding, most are milked 3 x per day for the first several days to help increase production. Every other dairy breeder I know also milks their does all the way out.
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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I appreciate you opinion on the milk fever but I totally disagree with your statement. We feed dairy quality alfalfa (tested both in protein and calcium) and would still never risk it. Milk fever has nothing to do with a previous diet. It has to do with replacing back into her own system the calcium she put into the milk. If she isnt giving enough of a chance to re absorb/replace the calcium, she can get milk fever. So if your method works for you that is great. Keep doing it. But seeing how the first 2 days at least are a colostrum rich milk that cant be mixed with other milk without causing issues, its pointless to milk em out in that time period anyways. Not to mention you dont want to start pushing for milk production so early. If more milk is what you need, then more goats would be the answer.
 

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Milk fever (hypocalcemia) is caused when the doe did not receive adequate calcium in her diet during pregnancy and prior to kidding. This is why you want to feed some form of alfalfa, especially to dairy goats who are naturally higher milk producers.
No, neither of these statements are correct. Milk fever is caused by a doe's inability to mobilize calcium during kidding or just prior to kidding. The usual cause is a diet high in calcium - such as feeding straight alfalfa hay.
 

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Well, I'm not gonna jump in over who's right and who's wrong, but I have pulled many kids at birth and milked the doe twice a day every day since she kidded. I have done this with many does for years and I have never had a doe get milk fever.
But, just gonna throw this out there, they can get milk fever before they even kid, same with a cow, the can get it before.
 

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I'm watching you
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If a doe can't mobilize calcium properly, she's not getting enough phosphorus to move it. Or she's getting so high of protein that it's 'stuck'. My does are milked out twice a day to empty from day one. Never have had a problem even with 16 lb. a day milkers.
There's no way a single can drink what a Saanen is bred to give.
 
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