The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Kinder Goat Breeder
Joined
·
4,627 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about making a warming barrel for the coming winter kidding season. I know there are some old threads about making them, but I wanted to see what you current members do. Do you attach the lamp on the inside or just above it? I have the opportunity to use a 33 gallon or 55, I'm assuming the 55 is the way to go? What kind of lamp/lightbulb do you prefer? And do you cut the bottom off or leave it intact?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,780 Posts
I don’t have barrels but just because I have smaller stalls. But the ones I have seen have the lamps inside. Usually they feed the cord threw the hole of a 55 gallon drum.
I would leave the bottom on, it will make it more solid. But I would also consider making two holes. There have been a few cases where mom has wanted to lay close to their baby and blocked them in and wouldn’t let them out and they died. I’m not sure if they are just terrible mothers, I couldn’t imagine one of mine just laying there as their baby was crying BUT I would sure play it on the safe side and have two holes ;)
I like the premier 1 bulbs. They are thicker, and they don’t seem to get super hot. Being in a barrel it shouldn’t take much to heat it up.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
8,483 Posts
Take a plastic, food grade barrel, cut the hole in the top and side. Use one of Premier's heat lamps, they are fully enclosed and very fire safe. (no light is 100%). Hang it over the barrel.
I call it the Easy Bake Oven! Make sure that you have a lip at the bottom, or all the bedding slides out and the kid lays on plastic and his own poop. I also drill a few vent holes in the sides,
to let a little air in, heat out. It does get warm in there- Get a brooder thermometer, (tractor supply, a few dollars)- it helps you to know how warm the barrel is.

I also hang the light from a chain to something above the barrel, attaching the light cord to the chain- less apt for a doe to chew on it. I also strap the barrel to the wall- using twine,
lead rope, etc. That way, it won't get moved if the doe rubs on it. (then the light won't get moved either).
 

·
Member
Joined
·
8,483 Posts
Goats are pretty resilient. If they are full term, healthy and nursing- the most important thing is that first colostrum. Get them dried off and in a draft free area-
They really don't need supplemental heat unless it is really cold (to them, not us- we get cold at 50ºF!) Nature is pretty neat- if kids are born in the winter,
their coats are thicker than ones born in summer. (if mom has good nourishment, etc.) I had kids born at 20ºF in the barn (before I insulated the ceiling), and
they did just fine- no extra heat at all. It all depends on getting them dry and eating.

I have "goat boxes" in pens where there are other does and kids,they are basically square dog houses. Sturdy and about 3" square.
That way, kids can get inside away from does, they have their own little place to sleep.
They must be sturdy- as everyone will climb on and jump off, etc. Attach to a wall so they don't flip the box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I buy the plastic barrels with the removable lids so I can take the sensitive parts inside. I cut the 9 or 10-in square in the bottom of the barrel then at the top I screw in the box that holds the ceramic fixture then I cut an extension cord and take the and strip the wires and put it in through a hole I'm making the top of the barrel and into the bracket that holds the ceramic fixture making sure I get one of those little parts that go in the hole and you can cramp down on the wire with so that the whole thing is hardwired in and it just needs a 125 watt bulb to work. There's a little more skilled I might make some sort of cage underneath the bulb to prevent them from getting up higher when they get older but it works great for them when they're young and I raise nubians.
I secure them in a corner with ratchet straps
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Kinder Goat Breeder
Joined
·
4,627 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Goats are pretty resilient. If they are full term, healthy and nursing- the most important thing is that first colostrum. Get them dried off and in a draft free area-
They really don't need supplemental heat unless it is really cold (to them, not us- we get cold at 50ºF!) Nature is pretty neat- if kids are born in the winter,
their coats are thicker than ones born in summer. (if mom has good nourishment, etc.) I had kids born at 20ºF in the barn (before I insulated the ceiling), and
they did just fine- no extra heat at all. It all depends on getting them dry and eating.

I have "goat boxes" in pens where there are other does and kids, they are basically square dog houses. Sturdy and about 3" square.
That way, kids can get inside away from does, they have their own little place to sleep.
They must be sturdy- as everyone will climb on and jump off, etc. Attach to a wall so they don't flip the box.
That's a very good point. We probably won't use the lamp feature unless it's real cold. The time of year we are kidding has the possibility of having negative temps at night, so I certainly will like having the option since both my girls kidded at night last year.🙄
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
After they nursed a couple time I teach mine to use them and they're just available in the corners the kiss side when they. After they've nursed a couple times I'll put them in a barrel and believe me they'll get out when they're ready to nurse and then they decide when they want to go back. I often kid though between January and March. Here in Southwest Missouri our temperatures can very radically so she can be cold here when it's not that cold gets up and is 50 or 60 degrees one day and then it's negative five the next it said difficult thing so they learn to choose when they want to go in barrels.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top