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My kids were born last March, which makes them a year and a half old.

When weighed for their surgical castration, they were 95 and 110 lbs at just over a year old.

They're LaManchas bred on a dairy farm, and both have the same father.

The lighter weight goat had a pretty bad tapeworm infestation last year that I didn't recognize until August/Sept; I suspect he came to me with it since I got them in early July.

The wintered outside and were fed hay, along with a ration of goat chow from the farm store.


After reading the stories of everyone's monster goats, it sounds like they're a bit small for their age? Are LaManchas just a bit smaller than some of the other dairy breeds?

Will they continue to grow and get bigger? And for how long? They weren't wethered until this August and seem more interested in eating than they used to. I'm wondering if going through a fall rut slowed down growth?


They're happy and healthy and roaming around someones yard right now so I guess I shouldn't worry about how big they are so much as what they're into ;)
 

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I don't have personal experience with lamanchas...probably too smart for me.. ;) but I think they are considered a medium size breed. I know goats grow to about 4 or 5 years old. Alpines/sanens/nubians are large breeds. I also think they grow faster early (like might get to full height at 2 and bulk up a bit to 4 and 5 years). Obers and I think lamachas may have latter growth spurts and seem smaller but may catch up by 4 or 5 years old. It depends on genetics too. Did you see the parents? That can give you a good gauge to how big they may get.

Oh...and the "goat chow " -check the feed label...make sure the Cal:phos ratio is 2:1 or better 3:1. Most "goat chow" is really for does and not wethers (some feed as kids only). Most have really high protein too like 22% - look at the feeding grain topics here. But this winter might look into a livestock blend with 14% protein and proper cal:phos ratio or even COB (corn,oats,barly) that is 7-9% protein. We don't get very cold here on the Washington coast. I don't feed any grain at all. Cold climates might be different...but I think a good quality hay creates more heat working in the rumen than grain would.
 

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Hello,

don't get discouraged by comparing them with other goats.

First - you love them and you seem to fit well together.

Next - they will grow until age 4, if they then still have some catching up to do, maybe even till age 5. Every goat has its own growing rhythm and speed.

A faster growing goat is not necessarily the better goat. You have much more to take care with nutrition and exercise to avoid problems with bones and joints.

And a smaller goat can carry a load, too. It's not size that carries loads, it's attitude and work ethic.
 

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With nothing to compare for scale it is hard to tell, but they don't look like small goats to me. If those weights were at just over a year (so early spring I am guessing), I imagine they have grown quite a bit. Our small guy was 155 at a year and a half, our big one was 178. They are ober/alpine crosses. I heard that same thing about earlier growth in Alpines, so I figure they have done a lot of their growing in these first two springs. They were late February/early March kids. I would guess they were a little more than 110 at just over a year, but not by much. I was also worried about how big they should be, and it sounds like compared to some they are huge for their age, and others have had goats that were even bigger at the same age. I guess I'll know in 2-3 more years. Your guys sure look good in that photo, although I guess with my guys being castrated late also, I am partial to the look of those big majestic horns and heavy necks... and those thick beards.
 

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Those are nice looking goats. I have a Saanen and a LaMancha that I've had since kids. It may have been my imagination but it seemed that the Saanen grew in spurts and the LaMancha just seemed to have a slower and steady growth. I didn't think he would even reach 200 pounds but he did this year at 4 years old, with the Saanen topping out at about 235. The LaMancha has always been the better trail goat being enthusiastic and athletic so size doesn't always make the best goat. For a variety of reasons I just got two more 2 year old LaManchas this year. At two they look small (about 135 and 150) but it would be hard to beat their sweet and smart personalities.
Denise
 
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