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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I feel like I just can't catch a break here. We got our first goats 2 months ago, and just seems like all I do is treat foot problems. Is it normal to have so many issues?
I brought home a rescue doe that had severe hoof rot - so I can't really include her in this, but she's been on the mend, and doing GREAT. But she's had hoof scald in the past too...

A preggo doe got some hoof rot, and is close to being healed.

Our buckling has finally gotten over hoof scald

A doe we bought 3 weeks ago has been lame for a couple of days and I checked her foot everywhere, and FINALLY tonight opened up an abscess.

Oh, and the preggo doe I mentioned above had a little hoof scald on a back foot - a little thrush XX and she was fine in the afternoon...

Any ideas on what I can do to get everyone's feet in shape? Should I just pick their feet every day or every other day depending on how much wet weather we have? Some are in need of trimming, which we'll do later this week, but what about hoof scald? I'd love to NOT have to use thrush XX on them all the time - it's smelly, turns their hair green...

My husband has done some work around the barn on the sides, and backside, so it's dirt and when it rains it's muddy. They love to be around this area when it's hot out so they can lay in the cool mud <which is why they need baths too!>. I thought maybe I'd put a layer of bedding down to keep them from walking in mud...but then the ground wouldn't dry out.
I know mud packing in their feet isn't great...

I worked on a horse farm for 2 years, and had around 60+ horses in our care...and I can't remember ever having a lot of issues with their feet like this. We did pick feet on some just about every morning, but some mares were barren <not pregnant>, and the only time we messed with them was during feeding, or doing a quick check over, and regular blacksmith.
I know goats aren't horses, but I just don't know what I can do. It's frustrating, because you get them all in good shape, and then suddenly one slacks off.

We had a really rainy month in May, and so far this month it's been really hot, humid, and we've had off and on rain --- had a thunderstorm today that dumped nearly an inch of rain, so now the ground is moist.

Am I cursed? LOL Or are others going through this as well?

I'm sure things will get better, but whew..... And they all look so great IMO other than just needing a bath. Just gotta keep their feet in shape!
 

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I feel so bad for you! :hug: I think you are just cursed. :laugh: You know I'm as new to this as you, but I'm sure all of the rain and wet ground have a lot to do with it. We've had lots of rain but no hoof problems yet (knocking on wood because we've had enough problems for awhile). But while there are a lot of wet areas, a lot of it stays high and dry so they get a break. I think it's contagious, too, so one having it and the wet ground could have spread it?
I wonder if getting some free wooden pallets from somewhere and putting them on the ground, so they have a place to get out of the mud, would help? That way the ground could still dry, too. Either that or an area with some gravel??
 

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I can't speak to hoof problems per se, but I have had a couple of hoof injuries which has led me to believe that the foot of a goat is a delicate spot. One per goat over the course of six months, both of which bled like crazy...I have since inspected every square inch of their housing and removed everything that even looks like a threat, including some suspicious rocks...

I suspect the fact that I live in a desert and never experience over 10% humidity is the main reason I don't have any experience with foot rot/scald/abcesses etc. Even in winter the pen stays pretty dry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. It's frustrating, and while everyone is pretty much doing well, I just don't want any more issues. I've heard it can be contageous, so I've been watching everyone closely.
The pallet idea is a good one, and we do have pallets - they are stacked up on top of a huge firewood pile, so that is definitely a good possability. I know they loved them when I used to keep them down in the barn for them to sleep on.

Realfoodmama - I am in central Kentucky, and it's been a crazy spring. We had more rain in the month of May than we had from Jan-April, and it was one of the wettest Mays on record. Then the past few weeks it's been very hot, humid, and rainy. And I just read it will be in the low 90s again tomorrow, but with humidity it will feel like the lower 100's...ugh..
The good thing is, the thrush xx knocks the scald out pretty quick. If I put it on in the morning, then by the afternoon they are usually walking fine again, or at least have major improvement.

They are definitely 'colorful' goats right now.... with green and blue feet!
 

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I feel so bad for you! :hug: I think you are just cursed. :laugh: You know I'm as new to this as you, but I'm sure all of the rain and wet ground have a lot to do with it. We've had lots of rain but no hoof problems yet (knocking on wood because we've had enough problems for awhile). But while there are a lot of wet areas, a lot of it stays high and dry so they get a break. I think it's contagious, too, so one having it and the wet ground could have spread it?
I wonder if getting some free wooden pallets from somewhere and putting them on the ground, so they have a place to get out of the mud, would help? That way the ground could still dry, too. Either that or an area with some gravel??
I agree with Perfect7....getting something for them to walk on or to loaf around... so they can stay out of the muck... will help in healing....trimming their hoofs....and getting all the stinky/ bad stuff away.. will also help..in healing with treatment...if the 1 trimming isn't enough.....and ..you need to trim away more... then do so... in about 2 weeks or less.... the key is... to keep the feet dry .....no matter what things you put down for them...to do so..... Good luck.... :hug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Pam. The only place that's really muddy is just around the barn, and only if it's rained. Hopefully the small chance for rain/storms tomorrow will not happen so the ground can continue to dry out.
I'll see about getting the pallets down for them to walk on, especially in the shady area where they like to rest. At night I am not worried because they sleep in front of the barn where we have 2 rolls of hay, and they typically pull a lot out and end of standing on it, and it's not as bad there. Daytime is probably the worst - pallets would be great, and I have about 7 or 8 of them from when we built or barn frame.

I'll just start picking feet every day - the ones that have had the issues I'll check morning/evening, and the others I'll do in the evening. Hopefully we can get everyone good again. The only one walking lame is the doe that had the abscess that I popped today, which is a relief. But I want good healthy feet, and will do what I can to get them in shape :)
 

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You know I think I have read that foot problems might be a deficiency of something. I can't remember what...was it copper or do I have copper on the brain? I will google it.
 

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No, you are not alone. It's been the same here in Alabama. :sigh: Pen helped with Thrush Buster on the sheep and Kopertox and Pen for the goats. We used pallets around the feeder and for the "snack bar". They have a path of pallets to get to different areas. Some use it, some walk around them. They like to lay on them and eat hay.

I am using a hoof knife on the worst two. I've been to chicken to cut to much, so I trim then trim so more in a couple of days. They are all walking so much better. Just an occasional hop every now and then.

I think the best thing has been the sun. Our bad areas are dried up. (til it rains again)

Anyone know how to give extra zinc? How much and what kind etc.

Gina
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My husband will be up in a little while, and I'll have him help me figure out how to lay pallets and try to keep feet dry.
I went out a little while ago and cleaned feet. I'll check feet again after I feed.

It's been a strange spring IMO. Typically it's wet/rainy in March and April. But April was very dry, and warm. Then as soon as May 1st came, the rains came and we had over 10 inches of rain in May! This month hasn't been that much, but it's been a lot, or seems that way.
It's dry so far today, and hot, so hopefully the ground will dry out, and the small chance of storms later will not happen.

Gina- How is Murray doing? I hope he is continuing to improve? I am so sorry we are going through this! It's soooo very frustrating! I will admit my husband hasn't been the biggest helper in this, but then he isn't the one dealing with the feet, I've been doing it, but I am going to make his stubborn butt listen to me when he gets up! He isn't concerned, and STILL doesn't believe this stuff can be contageous. But I know he thinks about his dads goats, and how his dad doesn't have very many issues, but then, they live in a dry climate without the humidity. So what he knows kinda goes out the window when your dealing with opposite conditions.

As soon as he gets up I want him to help me figure out how to lay pallets. If they want to lay or walk on that side of the barn <shady and also where I keep the water buckets>, then they are going to have to walk on pallets to do it.
 

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Murray is still on the road, or should I say, the pallet to recovery. :laugh: He is looking a lot better. I am so happy and will be even happier when we can move. The new land hasn't had anything on it, so hopefully this won't happen again. Plus it has hills that they can move up if it gets too wet.

Gina
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good luck with the new place Gina! Hopefully they will all be over their hoof issues so they dont' take it with them!

My husband put rocks around the sides of the mini barn today, and I lined the area of dirt between the rocks and the fence on one side with bedding so they aren't walking on mud - it's a hard mud as it's trying to dry out. Thankfully the area in front of the barn where they sleep, and where the rolls of hay are at dry out really quick and arent a huge deal since that area gets full sun all day long.

So hopefully doing this, and treating feet, picking feet and checking daily will help get us on the right road... First hint of someone walking a little 'off' and I'll be out the door with my gear ready to conquor the villain LOL

BTW, we had just enough rain today to water the garden, but didn't make a big mess of things. But it looks like we have a good chance of rain/storms starting tomorrow night....not looking forward to that! Especially the heat they are calling for tomorrow...I love summer...but...
 

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Yep. We have a rain coming in I think Thursday or Friday. :sigh: Maybe it won't last long. Heck, the grass is so long the goats can't keep up. We let them into the front yard to "mow" when we get home in the evenings til we give a pint of blood. LOL! Bad skitters!

Gina
 

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You have to remember that hoof rot is VERY contagious.... so it would make sense if the goats that are being housed with the first doe to get hoof rot would all get hoof rot as well.

I'd lay out a foot bath in a common gate (where they MUST walk through it to get to and from food) it will keep it clean and kill off the hoof rot that starts to grow while the resdiue left on the ground dies off.

Of course, frequent trimming and some toys that are off the ground would be very helpful as well. :)

Good Luck!!!! It will get better! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
myfainters said:
You have to remember that hoof rot is VERY contagious.... so it would make sense if the goats that are being housed with the first doe to get hoof rot would all get hoof rot as well.

I'd lay out a foot bath in a common gate (where they MUST walk through it to get to and from food) it will keep it clean and kill off the hoof rot that starts to grow while the resdiue left on the ground dies off.

Of course, frequent trimming and some toys that are off the ground would be very helpful as well. :)

Good Luck!!!! It will get better! :)
Thanks so much! I have been trying to figure out a foot bath idea, just not sure where i could put one/what i could use. if I put thrush xx in a spray bottle and spray everyone's feet, hoof by hoof would that do about the same thing as a foot bath?

If a foot has no signs of rot, just healing tissue do you all think the goat is int he clear? Molly - the rescue doe hasn't shown any signs of dead tissue lately, so I haven't been keeping her feet wrapped, however if it rains again, I am going to wrap her feet - to keep mud, etc. from getting in there and softening up her foot tissue.

I use thrush XX every day at least 1-2x. For the two does that I am keeping hoof packs on, I am using animalintex/thrush buster.

If the spray bottle idea would work for thrush xx then after I feed each day , I'll pick out feet <I am doing this anyway>, and spray some on. Or does it need to be something they need to stand in for a couple of minutes? I can always hold each foot up for a minute or two to let it settle in...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I was just wondering, what are good 'natural' ways to give my goats zinc? They don't really have bad feet, just need to be trimmed like... NOW.
I blame this one on my husband who is supposed to be knowledgeable about horses/goats. UGH...don't get me started...haha...

Anyway, with everyone suggesting adding more zinc to help keep the feet strong and healthy, I was wondering what kind of foods could I give them? Any veggies, or things I can add to their feed. I don't want to get carried away, but I figured adding some here and there could be very beneficial.
 

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All bran cereals are rich in Zinc. so I would imagine and please goat experts correct me if I am wrong here but adding bran (as in a bag of bran you can buy to make a bran mash for horses) would be a decent add to a normal ration to bring up the zinc.

Tara
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
mrs. lam said:
I would also like to add zinc. Hoosier, do you have a long, lost sister? I think we may be related. :shades:

Gina
Haha, maybe!

The bran sounds like a good idea, hopefully someone can tell us if it's good for goats. If there is one thing I can find plenty of around here, it's stuff for horses...! We have '5' feed stores in the small town nearby, and only like '2' of them sell things for different animals - one sales basic feeds but not a lot else unless you have horses, cattle or dogs. The other one that I have been using sells a lot more from grains, to medications, to farm supplies/rocks/shavings/etc.
But all 5 specialize in horse feed - 3 of them specialize in horses only.
Oh - and I'll probably have to line up a vet out of the county as well, because everyone around here either deals with small 'non hooved' animals, or they deal with horses/cattle ONLY.
That's one reason we try to do as much as we can on our own without needing a vet, and save for calling on a vet during an emergency - vets in these parts are not inexpensive...

The ground is drying out really good around our barn, but rain/storms have been forming right over the top of us, no rain here just yet, and I am honestly hoping it stays that way.
It's 81 with a humidity of 80% -YUCK!- but it's been a little windy so that helps. Sure would help if the ground stays dry for a while though!
 
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