Mastitis Caused By A Mycobacterium Species

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by kornhypknotic, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    I think I've got a nontuberculosis mycobacterium species circulating though my dairy herd causing devastating fast-acting mastitis. Has anyone else had experience with this issue?

    The reason I say mycobacterium is because of a milk culture done on a goat (last year) when she had pretty intense mastitis. Long story, but I finally got the results back of that culture back today (1 year and 2 weeks after submitting it :veryangry: ) and mycobacterium was the culpit of Falsie's mastitis. CAE didn't help her much either (please see the post "Hard Udder" in this forum - that's the goat I'm talking about). Right after we put this goat down another young goat, Allie (also CAE pos.), came down with mastitis, sepsis, fever, and anorexia (please see post "Sick Doe" in this forum). I saved her, but this past Tuesday I lost another young promising milker, Suzie (also probably CAE pos., but too young for the ELISA tests to be accurate) to a very fast-acting form of mastitis resulting in sepsis, fever, shock, and death in almost 24 hours (please see the post "Ok . . . Stop making milk now, Suzie" in the Dairy Diaries forum). :tears:

    I was unable to get cultures on either Allie or Suzie's milk due to budget constraints. Still, call me crazy . . . but I have a feeling that all three of these goats had the same thing. Both Falsie and Allie presented high fevers (106F+), sudden onset of severe one-sided mastitis & edema, sepsis, anorexia, unresponsiveness to penicillin (IM and teat infusion) & cephapirin teat infusions, lameness in the rear legs, pneumonia-like symptoms, etc. Suzie didn't live long enough for me to observe anything but one-sided mastitis, fever over 106F, sepsis, lameness, trouble breathing, shock, and death. :sigh:

    Has anyone had experience with this particular bug? I would like to hear your thoughts on the matter including the elimination of this pathogen.
     
  2. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    Im sorry tohear about yor does Jess. This artical though has been very interesting to me. Im very atimate about testing for mastitis and is you read a lot of my posts on sick goats you will see that when i milking doe goes off in anyway mastitis is one of the first things i start investigating.
    I did some reading and sound some interesting articals. this one in particular
    http://www.vet.uga.edu/VPP/clerk/logan/index.php
    it talks more about CAE then it does mastitis. but there has been some extensive research done in the states and CAE has been linked to mastitis.There are forms of CAE and this artical lists them and there clinical signs, but i found this little blurb really interesting and found it similar to your case...

    Mastitis, especially interstitial mastitis, is another form of CAE. Clinical signs include a firm, distended udder from which milk cannot be expressed. The mastitis usually is observed around parturition.5,8

    The final major form of CAE viral infection is chronic progressive weight loss. The progressive weight loss also can occur with any of the other forms of the disease.9,16

    before either of your does passed did you notice the temperature of their udders? where they discolored at all?

    beth
     

  3. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    Thanks for that article, Beth :hug: . . . Falsie's udder was hot at first, but as her disease progressed her udder either cooled down or her entire body heated up to the original temperature of her udder. Allie's udder was boiling hot all throughout her ordeal. Poor Suzie's udder was also hot at first, but cooled down (or her body temp went up) as she progressed.

    I am sure that the CAEV weakened their immune system so that this bacteria could infiltrate their bodies with greater ease than it would a naturally healthy doe. Mycobacteria is a ubiquitous organism (or so the milk culture test says) so in a normally healthy animal it should not be a problem . . . but these poor girls were already compromised.

    A serious problem that I have with my herd is that I only have 15 does of breeding age and 13 have tested either positive or weak positive for CAE. I cannot cull CAE out of the herd without sending the farm into the red. This year I pasteurized all the milk I fed to kids and tried very hard to keep everything CAE-free. I suppose I'll find out how well it worked in about 2 years or so.

    Since I can't eliminate CAE for years and years and years I want to try to work on controlling mastitis, especially this deadly strain.
     
  4. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    youre a good person for choosing to try and control the CAE. I know some peopel that their herds have tested positive and they just keep dam raising kids. Then they sell the animals and the disease just keep spreading.
    It founds like your does had a bad case of gangrene mastitis. Im not sure what strain of bacteria causes gangrene. It very well may be the one youre dealing with. It also could be a number of different ones. Gangrene hits hard and fast and you dont always see the blue/black udder because it does hit so fast. The high body fever and cold udder are classic signs of gangrene.
    beth
     
  5. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    My original thought was gangrene mastitis too! But it's a different bacteria that causes it . . . a staphylococcus or pasteurella . . . and I've read that it is rarely contagious. Mycobacterial infections have similar symptoms, but with more pneumatic symptoms and all without gangrene.

    Falsie lived for a very long time with this condition and if she was going to show symptoms of gangrene I think they would have happened while she was alive. I wish we would have done a necropsy of her udder! :doh:
     
  6. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    it definatly would of been intreresting to have neocropsies of both of them to see what was really going on, but should woulda coulda huh? Finacially it can be tough to do one. but im still interested to see what you find out about the strain you have.
    beth
     
  7. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Do you have access to the veterinary text "Sheep and Goat Medicine"? It has a full page on Mycoplasm Mastitis. I can try to scan and send you a copy of the pages if you PM me your email.

    Anyway, "Mycoplasm infected milk may be significant source for infection of young animals, which then develop arthritis and keratoconjuntivitis. Feeding of mastitic milk to young kids and lambs is discouraged because it may result in lifelong infection."

    There IS a contagious form, it is rare. M. agalactiae is the organism's name. The milk is infective, so I think it would be easy to spread through a milking parlor.

    It sounds extremely nasty and I am sorry you are going through this. :(
     
  8. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    ps. "milk from infected udders is more alkaline" I wonder if this relates to your good producing doe that gives off tasting milk. :( :( :(
     
  9. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    I just went to my vet tech school library to look at that very book. What I read there is pretty much the inspiration for this post.

    I started giving Wappy propylene-glycol to try to counteract that alkalinity caused by ketosis rather than mastitis (I read about that as a treatment in "Veterinary Medicine Handbook" - i think was the name of the book. 500ml for an adult cow so I just give her a 'splash'). . . I don't want to make any judgments yet, but today I think her milk tasted slightly better. :pray:
     
  10. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Good for you for finding that text! I ordered it to have on hand since I don't know if I could get a vet to come out for an emergency... I just can't believe how nasty that type of infection is. :(

    Do you think the CAE symptoms are CAE or this other infection? Or are they inter-related? It wasn't clear from my book.
     
  11. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    I think it's a bit of both. The symptoms certainly can be similar though and neither one helps control the other.

    :sigh: Today another doe is looking lethargic and pretty sad overall. Her anemia score is ok, she's not losing weight, she's not off feed, but she's slower than usual to get out to pasture and she's looking a bit pathetic . . . milk is normal. I'm very worried :worried:

    Edit: Oh dear . . . I just calculated her weekly production and it's down 1.3 pounds this week. She has a low fever of 103.7F
    :worried:
     
  12. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Oh NO, not another one! :tears: I can't imagine how heart breaking this must be for you. :hug:
     
  13. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    I feel so bad with you. My thoughts are with you and your does. If i were you i would start treating this new one now. Get some tomorrow, one tube per side. Milk her out in twenty four hours later and do one tube per side again reapeat in another twenty four hours. Start her on some penicillian. 6 cc's per 100 lbs get asn much vit c down her as you can. you cant do too much. if she is still testing positive in two weeks do another three day treatment of tomorrow. We did this to a friend of mines doe who had a bad case of mastitis adn it worked great.
    Keep them standing as long as you can after milking or treating. give them time for their orfice to naturally make the plug.
    beth
     
  14. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    oooh . . . but mycobacterium are resistant to penicillin . . . that was part of the problem I had with the other girls. If it's the same thing I'll need to use LA-200 or oxytetracycline :worried:

    Today her temp was down :) . . . but a 4 month-old kid had some pretty significant diarrhea and she looked a bit uncomfortable. Shouldn't be coccidia, but I treated her for that anyway :shrug: She had a temp 104.2F. :doh:

    A different doe's had a high Scc for 2 months and she had lower production today and her temp was 104F . . . I think I'm just paranoid :GAAH: :hair:
     
  15. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    Hmmm i would get her on the LA, then. I dont take any chances with mastitis. It can be really nasty if left un treated.
    beth
     
  16. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

  17. kornhypknotic

    kornhypknotic New Member

    273
    May 14, 2009
    Waco, TX
    She looked better on Saturday then this Sunday she was barely eating anything. no fever no signs of mastitis . . . anemia score is also normal :worried:
     
  18. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    hmm im stumped? have you contacted anyone at WADDLE or UC Davis? they have experts there. Or maybe try and find a vet that specializes in goats.
    beth