The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for you experienced goat owners:
We have a registered Nubian doe that we got this spring (pregnant). After getting her to our friends, who were keeping her for us for a couple weeks while we bottle fed a cross breed "paddock mate" for her, we discovered she had mastitis in the right udder. We got with a vet and treated it with antibiotics and Tomorrow, and it pretty much cleared up for the last 90 days of her pregnancy.

During that time, both udders enlarged, as can be expected. Once she kidded on May 21, we realized the mastitis was back on her right udder. Since then we've been bottle feeding the two bucklings off her left side, which is giving us right at 6 pounds a day. We had our vet out again, who recommended Today for a couple days and antibiotics again. So far, the affected side has shrunk to about the size it was when we bought her (before breeding), the pink milk (never got more an an ounce or so) has cleared up, and now all I get at each milking is barely enough to cover the bottom of the strip cup, vitrually nothing. All the heat is gone out of the udder and it has softened quite a bit. It's actually smaller than the left side AFTER milking her down.

Here are my questions:
1)Has the right udder been pretty much destroyed by the mastitis?

2) We really would like to breed her again to get a doeling out of her. The blood line is excellent and I don't want to buy another doe right now. Is it reasonable to think we could keep the mastitis in check to the point it would not be painful / dangerous to her to get one more breeding out of her next year and then retire her?

This is our first goat breeding. We bought her from another farm that has a good reputation here in West TN, but since they had bred her last year and sold her to us, when we asked if she had ever had a problem with mastitis, the answer was no. We'd like to believe that, but when we got her 30 days after being bred, we found the mastitis to be pretty well established. Does that seem funny?

Thanks
CZ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
Its hard to say. The big drop in production on that side is most likely from the pressure which naturally causes the udder to stop producing milk. Once you were able to correct the problem that side had already shut down.You probably won't know the full impact until her next freshening. Most likely the udder will be lopsidded with one side producing more than the mastitus side.

Mastitus is common even in animals at universities with a whole barn full of experts. Almost everyone who has had milking does for any length of time will have to deal with it. Dairy farmers usually just ship the infected cow to market because they are going to end up spending money on medications, vet visits and lost production only to end up with an animal that isn't likely to produce 100% ever again. As a goat owner we have a more vested emotional attachment to the animal and may keep them anyway. There are no quick answers but it has been our experience that the mastitus infection will have a significant impact on milk production.

If you have the doe for milk then you may want to sell her. If you are just using her to breed for big kids then the milk production isn't that big of a deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rex,
Thanks for the response. Since last note, the right side is producing about a half cup of milk a day, and has cleared up, no color, strings, lumps, etc. A local lady that had a dairy herd for years suggested we just let that side dry off.
One of the boys is nursing and we're supplementing him with a bottle. Most times he's getting enough off the left side that he's not real interested in the bottle. The other guy is 100% bottle. Fortunately the doe is nursing the one boy and still giving me over 6 lbs/day, so we're not in short supply of milk by any means.

The grandbaby and her two cousins are asking for Fame's chocolate milk on a regular basis!

The lady that did the disbudding for us was a former Nubian dairyowner/ show person. She was very impressed with the kids, said great conformation and large. The one that's nursing was larger at birth and is now about an inch taller than his sibling. At 2 weeks (yesterday), they're almost 16 inches at the withers. I noticed yesterday while in the paddock with them that they're both starting to browse already.

I'm very impressed with how social they are. They meet us at the stall gate and both kids crave attention when I'm milking and walking around with them.

Thanks again.
CZ
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
595 Posts
You'll want to really watch her and reevaluate next year, based on her milk production and your goals for getting milk from her but there's no reason to believe that this will seriously affect her future production.
If you were showing her that would be an issue or going for high production awards but if she's a farm goat no problem.

There are many types of mastitis. It's just a catchall description of inflammation of the udder. Sounds like she had one of the more benign types that heals up ok.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top