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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

This has been a horribly difficult week for me. I posted earlier about my doe going into labor early and the difficult delivery. I ended up taking her to the vet the day after the birth. I discovered that she had clumpy milk and wanted to follow up because of the rough delivery. She ended up having Mastitis. The vet gave her an infusion, antibiotics and pain meds. She really started going downhill fast from Friday morning to Friday evening. But as I went in late Friday to check on her and feed the kids their bottle she was doing better. I had hope that she might pull through, unfortunately that wasn't the case.

The vet acted like the mastitis wasn't a big deal. He told me to leave the kids on her. He didn't do a culture. And basically didn't give me any indication how serious this was. It wasn't until I got home and started to do my own research that I realized how horrible this could get. I followed all the advice for supportive care I could find, but to no avail. Now I am so worried about my 3 other goats. They are all about to freshen for the first time. I never knew to watch for mastitis BEFORE kidding. Besides feeling udders and looking for unevenness what can I do? How can I find out if they are carrying a serious from of mastitis? Is there a blood test? I was planning on selling some goats this year, and I don't want to sell a goat that could infect another herd. I wish the vet would have run a culture. I don't know if there is any other way to find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Is it possible that the mastitis caused her to go into labor early? Or was that just from having 3 large kids?
 

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Oh I'm sorry to hear what you're going through. I'm unclear on status of your mama? Still treating or did she pass?

I would clean all bedding out and lay down fresh clean bedding such as pine shavings..protect mamas from picking up bacteria from the ground. Keep a look out for redness, goat acting off..take temps if off. Be prepared to treat if needed. You may never see another case but being prepared in case you do can mean a huge difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you. Yes, we are working on all that. I am just afraid that there may have been exposure before we knew what was going on.

Sadly we did loose our doe. I don't know if we are going to continue to raise goats at this point. The heartbreaks are too much for us. We have had two losses in the last 3 years. That may not seem like a lot, but it sure feels like it to us.
 

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I'm sorry. :(
Loosing goats is super heart breaking. I have lost more than my fair share. After a good cry..I love on the others and move on because I have learned the joy of having goats out weigh the heart break. I know that may not be true for everyone..but after 15 years of goat raising..I cannot imagine life with out at least a few. Take time to recover and enjoy the ones who are there..then make a decision about continuing or not when your heart is not so bruised. ((Hugs))
 

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Thank you. Yes, we are working on all that. I am just afraid that there may have been exposure before we knew what was going on.

Sadly we did loose our doe. I don't know if we are going to continue to raise goats at this point. The heartbreaks are too much for us. We have had two losses in the last 3 years. That may not seem like a lot, but it sure feels like it to us.
I'm as sensitive as they come. If I'm present at the births I cry and I cry when they pass. I cry when I lose a chick, but farming on any level comes with ups and downs. Last winter was our worst year. We lost 2 does, one to mastitis and the other had complications delivering. I think she had internal bleeding. Plus we lost 5 kids. My poor husband had to listen to me bawl my eyes out and apologize for it when I was done. This year, last momma Kidded April 2nd and no losses this year.
Just thank God for what you have and be good stewards of what he has entrusted you with and keep fighting the good fight.
We treat our animals very well and in return they reward us with amusement, affection and food.
Sorry for your loss.

~Angela
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I appreciate you both for the love and encouragement. I am naturally a high stress person, and I don't do well with these things. I hate the loss of life. I love my animals. I celebrate their birthdays. Today was my labs birthday. She got popcorn and pork rinds, lol. But I also lost Lolli today. She was my favorite goat. Perfect mother and amazing herd queen and I am heart broken. I don't know if it is normal for this stuff to happen. If loosing a special goat every other year is normal, I guess goats are not for me. I just can't handle that. I'd love for someone to tell me this isn't typical..... Maybe I have management issues? Maybe I have genetic issues? We did go through major change this year. We move cross country with our goats. I feel like I am learning all over again. I have been vigilant about parasites. I knew that would be an issue. I have been working on learning about new plants, what is toxic and what is safe. But this completely blindsided me. We have clay here. I am not used to that at all. I don't know what to do about drainage. The barn doesn't get flooded, but it doesn't drain well. We have straw on top of it, but maybe that isn't good enough. I feel so stupid. I recognized the potential problem but I didn't ask for help with a solution.
 

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I'm so sorry you lost Lolli. I wonder if the wet ground is what contributed to it. Staph lives in the environment and certain types of staph infections can be very serious and also very contagious. However, not all mastitis cases are contagious, and some of it comes down to each individual doe's genetic resistance. I like the idea of spreading shavings down for a clean surface. If you can get all your girls in a clean, dry place it helps reduce environmental bacteria. Probiotics and Vitamin C are also recommended for mastitis prevention and treatment in humans as well as animals. A lot of folks recommend garlic but I've never successfully gotten my goats to eat that, and I also worry what it will do to the flavor of my milk!

I hope the rest of your kidding season brings nothing but joy and laughter. It's very hard losing our special caprine buddies, but I can't imagine life without their smiling faces and their hilarious antics. I'm sorry your vet was not more help. Please make sure he or she knows what happened. They may learn something from this too and it could help save another goat in future.
 

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Thank you. Yes, we are working on all that. I am just afraid that there may have been exposure before we knew what was going on.

Sadly we did loose our doe. I don't know if we are going to continue to raise goats at this point. The heartbreaks are too much for us. We have had two losses in the last 3 years. That may not seem like a lot, but it sure feels like it to us.
I'm as sensitive as they come. If I'm present at the births I cry and I cry when they pass. I cry when I lose a chick, but farming on any level come with ups and downs. Last winter was our worst year. We lost 2 does, one to mastitis and the other had complications delivering. I think she had internal bleeding. Plus we lost 5 kids. My poor husband had to listen to me bawl my eyes out and apologize for it when I was done. This year, last momma Kidded April 2nd and no losses this year. I
 

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You are way too hard on yourself!!! It’s not typical to lose a doe every other year in optimal operating conditions, but as we know not everyone has big fancy barns and lush green rolling hills of grass with an endless supply of money.
It’s very wet where we live too and drainage is almost non exsistent. I usually put straw down and do my best to bring my does into pens when I know it’s close to kidding so they can rest and not compete for food.
We tore all our pens down so we could have a barn built and my herd spent the winter under a 1 sided shelter with a dirt floor, at times the cows crowded in too. Not at all what we intended, but they all survived and now we are pampering them.
You will have to do what is best for you, but don’t let your health suffer as a result. You should definitely put yourself first. Stress is not good for no body.

I will say a prayer for you tonight.
 

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I lost a doe 2 years ago to staph mastitis. It was awful. But I have not had any other does come down with it. You can vaccinate with Lysigin before kidding if you are concerned about it
 
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