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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, with all this mud due to the endless rain we have been having comes some cases of hoof issues. I was trimming long feet on Weds. One of my pain in the butt, psycho does decided to pull her foot away. The point of the really dirty hoof trimmers ended up in my finger, right next to the side of the nail. Being busy, I didn't bother to do anything about it until way later. By Friday morning, it was infected under the nail and all along the outside of the nail, down to the top joint. I soaked and did all sorts of stuff, nope, just got worse.

By Saturday, the top of the finger was purple, with a huge pocket of greenish pus. One of the behavioral health nurses, also my friend, dragged me out to one of the ED docs who said either I get it lanced and get on heavy duty antibiotics or I would be in the hospital as a patient by morning for sepsis. I had been feeling sick the previous night, chills and pain in my finger, elbow and shoulder joints. I didn't have a thermometer to check my temp with- I had used them all on dogs and goats. Not sure I really wanted to put it in my mouth. LOL

BTW...I work at our local hospital.

Ok, I got it lanced and they are checking for the offending bacteria. One of the forms of hoof rot bacteria is one that humans can get. Then, of course, there is e coli, strep, staph that can be passed to humans.

I found out something I have wondered about for a while now- the nerves in my fingers are messed up. She put enough lidocaine in my finger to numb an elephant, and it worked for the pad part of my finger but did nothing for the top part. When it was lanced and squeezed, I felt it fully. OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Other organs in body are in the wrong place, too, so why not my nerve endings????? The ER doc said I was a "different". LOL

Anyway, if you get a cut while messing in farm mud, you might want to clean the wound asap, instead of waiting like I did. I usually never get infections or any bacterial/viral illnesses, but I guess it was bound to happen.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can't wear gloves and trim, or do much of anything else wearing gloves! I'm always stabbing myself with something, this is the first time it's ever gotten infected. Probably because the injury was tiny and right where the nail meets the finger, so it didn't get as clean as those in more open areas. The hoof rot bacteria are anaerobic, so they would thrive in that little area.
 
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Goat Mentor
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I usually cant do anything in gloves either. But i found BOSS ones at lowes and they fit well enough that i can actually work in them. They have reinforced fingertips and palms and velcro closed at the wrist. They are not heavy bit they are at least somethin to help keep my hands from bein beat up constantly.
I can't do anything in thick gloves, like leather or anything - I use thin gloves like gardening gloves or riding gloves (lol) and it at least protects the brunt of your skin.
 

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Go to a welding store, get Tig gloves. Tig welding requires major dexterity, so the gloves are thin leather, (goatskin). They fit well and work great for disbudding and trimming feet. Yes, the hoof trimmers will cut the leather, but generally, your skin won't get cut.

The gloves have cuffs, thin leather and unfortunately, are pricy. But they last a long time. I got mine from work when I worked construction and that was 5 yrs. ago.
 

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Go to a welding store, get Tig gloves. Tig welding requires major dexterity, so the gloves are thin leather, (goatskin). They fit well and work great for disbudding and trimming feet. Yes, the hoof trimmers will cut the leather, but generally, your skin won't get cut.

The gloves have cuffs, thin leather and unfortunately, are pricy. But they last a long time. I got mine from work when I worked construction and that was 5 yrs. ago.
Pigskin gloves is definitely the way to go. They are wash and wear, too. A little slick when wet, set them out in sun to dry, wad them up a few times to soften, good to go!
 
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The more work you do in gloves, the more you get used to them and the easier it is to function normally. It truly is just a matter of getting used to working in gloves. I used to feel like I couldn't do anything in them too. But I hate having my hands smell like goat poop after trimming, so I've learned to wear gloves, now it's no big deal. I now even work a pair of rubber/neoprene gloves over my leather gloves when i know I'm scrubbing hooves before trimming so the leather gloves don't get slippery. Saves the leather from getting hard.
 

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LOL. Glove snobs! LOLOL.
How do you blow a raspberry on here?

I tape my fingers where I tend to "snip" them
It has saved me some money, and also saved me some snips.
I can't do that, my tape is never where I left it, so I would not get to trim until I went to store.lol
 

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Thank goodness you're okay and you didn't get septic! Scary how fast some of these bugs can take hold!

Livestock is not for the faint of heart, the delicate of sensibilities, or people prone to the succombing to vapours...
I love this! When I read this quote my inner monologue voice switches to dainty southern belle mode lol.
 

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Might as well add my two cents
I wear a thick leather glove on the hand which is holding the hoof and my hand with the trimmers have no glove. I do happen to hold them with the same hand on each side.
 

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Goodness, Sully. Glad you are ok now! My Abigail is famous 'round here for being unable to trim hooves without blood - either hers or the goat's. Thanks for this reminder to be EXTRA diligent with those stabs and cuts!
 
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