The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, this is my first post to goatspot.

I am buidling my goat herd and I now have 1 eight month old buck, 1 fifteen month old pregnant doe, 1 fourteen week old doeling and I just got another 12 week old doeling seven days ago. Four total goats in all. All goats are Boer crosses.

The first two were the oldest goats and I had them about 7 weeks before getting the oldest doeling. All goats were doing well together until i got this last doeling a week ago.

She is not fitting in well. It seems to be because the oldest Doe is bullying her. She chases her and tries to ram her repeatedly in the barnyard. She leaves her alone out on pasture, but the poor baby always is apart from the rest a little.

The worst is when I lock them up in the barn at night. She always goes in last and when she gets in there, the pregnant doe is relentless. She chases her all over the inside of the little barn and gets her hung up in the chicken perches. I'm afraid she may not be getting much hay or water at night if the doe is guarding the hay manger.

I am hoping that the adult doe eventually tires of this behavior and the doeling becomes more at ease in my herd. Do you think this is a realistic expectation? Is this just some sort of hazing behavior? The older doe did not do this with the first doeling I acquired.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,944 Posts
I would consider separating the doe being bullied - at least at night - to prevent her from being hurt, and to make sure she is getting enough to eat. I would also think about putting her in a pen next to the main pen when shut in until the younger doe is big enough to hold her own. A 12 week doeling cannot defend herself against a 15 month old - it just isn't going to happen.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
84,608 Posts
I agree separate at night.

You may want to take the bully and separate her for 2 weeks or so, by herself or with one other she gets along with, then re-introduce her to the herd, this will create a new pecking order and the one being picked on, may not be in the spot light when it happens. ;)
 

·
Audrey
Joined
·
41 Posts
I just had the same problem with our girls... I ended up separating the "bully" out in a pen but within sight of the other girls for only a day... i was willing to go more but I didn't need to. It gave our newest a chance to make friends with another goat and it gave the bully a much needed time out. Now the bully is still the herd queen, and shows it, but not with the intent of killing the newest one. I also made sure to feed the bully separately, and had the newest get used to eating with the other girls without the horrible headbutting.

Now they are a mostly happy herd, the newest seems a bit like an outsider still, but we have some more babies coming home in a few weeks, so hopefully she will bond closer to one or more of them and help change the herd dynamics for the better.

Good luck, I hope that your problem clears up as easily as mine did!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
8,373 Posts
I agree, separate the bully! There will always be a queen and a low man on the totem pole, but the constant fighting isn't good for any of the goats!
Good luck with your herd dynamics! And welcome to the the site! There are many very knowledgable folks here, eager to lend a hand!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Separate the bully. Separating the victim just makes it harder. If meanie is taken out of the equation the new doe can get to know the others.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NyGoatMom
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top