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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After months of searching, I found a goat vet that will come to my farm. I haven’t heard anything about this particular vet, but I’ve heard some scary things about the vet office in general (not good with goats, killed my goat, won’t listen to owners) when I asked if anyone knew a goat vet on a local FB group. I also heard a few good things. I’m nervous. But this vet is my ONLY option. So here we go.

He’s coming out Tuesday afternoon. I have no current issues. Just want to establish a relationship with a vet and have them be familiar with my goats.

I am nervous. And I am having a mind wipe moment. I’m trying to get a list of what I should ask and the list is as empty as my head right now. I forgot to even ask them how much this will cost.

I’m assuming I shouldn’t immediately ask for Rx’s to have on hand, right? I’d still like your advice on what prescriptions are most important to have on hand, just in case it goes really well (or for a future appointment if I don’t feel that relationship was built in a short visit).

What should I ask this vet?

While I’m all for meds when warranted, I take a natural approach to health and parasite/disease prevention. For those who do the same, is there a good way to open a dialogue about it if the vet doesn’t seem very receptive to it? I’m also fine simply avoiding the topic if that’s better.

Is there anything I can do to make it easier on the vet (other than have my animals in the barn and ready to examine)? I’m assuming I should have a care sheet ready that shows their routine care regimen (what herbs/supplements I give and how often, current feeds and amounts, past weights, fecals results, vaccinations, etc). Anything else?

Here’s my sweet goats just because I like sharing pictures of them.
Plant Tree Bird Biome Carnivore
 

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I understand being all natural is what you want. But to be fair to the Vet, he needs the truth. Natural meds create chemical reactions in the goats system. He needs to know what you use so he can use the proper medicine in all services.
When I meet a vet, i ask them a question,I already know the answer to. To see if we can communicate and work together. I go by results Ive achieved through experience. And Im always willing to learn. Good luck. Hope.he works with you!
 

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I think just getting a feel for him in general is the most important thing. The best vet I have ever come across flat out admitted he has killed goats and doesn’t know much about them. But I would do my homework on the sick goat we were treating, we bounced ideas off of each other, he looked into things and that goat killing vet helped saved the doe. When a vet says hey let’s to X, he doesn’t have the right to do what he wishes, at any point you can say no I don’t want that done. How he reacts to it though I think is more important. Is he full of himself and will just walk away or hear your concerns and either explain it to you or come up with another approach? Know what I mean?
I think explain to the vet your view on natural remedies just how you did it here. I think why vets get so frustrated with the natural way is because people keep it up even when it’s not working and will not turn to modern medicine until it’s too late. I don’t see you being that kind of person and just let him see that as well.
Even if he’s not the greatest vet in the world, at least you will have a relationship with a vet. If you are not overly thrilled with him keep looking around. If he’s all you can get, then it’s better then nothing and when in doubt you have this group to help keep him in line lol
 

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(not good with goats, killed my goat, won’t listen to owners) when I asked if anyone knew a goat vet on a local FB group.
It is very common to hear these negative types of comments about vets concerning goats. Think about a few situations: not good with goats, sometimes mean not experienced with their care. A vet will tell you if they have treated many or only a few goats during their practice when asked. Be weary of a vet that has the attitude goats are dispensable and easily replaced. Killed my goat, take with a grain of salt. Many times a vet isn't called out until it's a last resort and the goat is extremely ill. Won't listen to owners, depends on way the the topic is approached. Having a two way conversation is different than being oppositional, argumentative, defensive and vague when discussing symptoms. I sometimes get the impression, bad mouthing a vet is used as an excuse for not involving vet care. You are an intuitive person, and a good judge of character, trust your instincts when meeting the new vet.

I have no current issues. Just want to establish a relationship with a vet and have them be familiar with my goats.
Under these circumstances, it's a perfect opportunity to obtain a livestock vet. It's a far better approach and less stressful to have vet care already in your toolbox, than waiting until you need vet care urgently. Good job FizzyGoats.

I’m assuming I shouldn’t immediately ask for Rx’s to have on hand, right?
Slippery slope on this one. The prescription medications have became tightly controlled in recent years. Many of the OTC type medications have been pulled from the shelves due to strict regulations. I've had the same vet (pets, livestock, exotics) since 1993 and she will allow me to purchase a whole bottle of antibiotics, if it is the same one prescribed at the time of treatment. Pain meds for home use, it will be Meloxicam and only enough for treatment. Once gone, it takes a trip for me into the office and she decides whether to continue, or change courses with something different. Things like Banamine are only given as a single dose by the vet, another single dose for later if it is necessary.

I’m assuming I should have a care sheet ready that shows their routine care regimen (what herbs/supplements I give and how often, current feeds and amounts, past weights, fecals results, vaccinations, etc). Anything else?
Good idea, it helps towards giving him an overall impression of your management style and skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like having Banamine on hand.
Id definitely like to have that if possible. Thanks!

I understand being all natural is what you want. But to be fair to the Vet, he needs the truth. Natural meds create chemical reactions in the goats system. He needs to know what you use so he can use the proper medicine in all services.
When I meet a vet, i ask them a question,I already know the answer to. To see if we can communicate and work together. I go by results Ive achieved through experience. And Im always willing to learn. Good luck. Hope.he works with you!
I hope he does too. Thank you. And I’m going to give/show him a list of everything I give the goats. I’d never purposefully withhold something I give them if he was prescribing something for them. I just don’t want to get in an argument about it. Since he’s all I’ve got out here, I’m really hoping to not butt heads with him (if that’s somehow a goat pun, it wasn’t intended.) That’s a great idea to ask questions I already know the answer to in order to see how and if we click. Thank you!

I think just getting a feel for him in general is the most important thing. The best vet I have ever come across flat out admitted he has killed goats and doesn’t know much about them. But I would do my homework on the sick goat we were treating, we bounced ideas off of each other, he looked into things and that goat killing vet helped saved the doe. When a vet says hey let’s to X, he doesn’t have the right to do what he wishes, at any point you can say no I don’t want that done. How he reacts to it though I think is more important. Is he full of himself and will just walk away or hear your concerns and either explain it to you or come up with another approach? Know what I mean?
I think explain to the vet your view on natural remedies just how you did it here. I think why vets get so frustrated with the natural way is because people keep it up even when it’s not working and will not turn to modern medicine until it’s too late. I don’t see you being that kind of person and just let him see that as well.
Even if he’s not the greatest vet in the world, at least you will have a relationship with a vet. If you are not overly thrilled with him keep looking around. If he’s all you can get, then it’s better then nothing and when in doubt you have this group to help keep him in line lol
Lol. Thank you. And that would be my dream vet. He doesn’t have to be the best goat vet out there, but if he’ll listen and bounce ideas around with me, that would be amazing! You made me feel a bit better. And you’re right, I’m all for modern medicine when needed. I’m actually all for whatever works best. And I do respect the 10+ years of schooling they have, all the training and time and such and I know, even if I have better goat specific information than they do, I don’t have the medical knowledge they do.

It is very common to hear these negative types of comments about vets concerning goats. Think about a few situations: not good with goats, sometimes mean not experienced with their care. A vet will tell you if they have treated many or only a few goats during their practice when asked. Be weary of a vet that has the attitude goats are dispensable and easily replaced. Killed my goat, take with a grain of salt. Many times a vet isn't called out until it's a last resort and the goat is extremely ill. Won't listen to owners, depends on way the the topic is approached. Having a two way conversation is different than being oppositional, argumentative, defensive and vague when discussing symptoms. I sometimes get the impression, bad mouthing a vet is used as an excuse for not involving vet care. You are an intuitive person, and a good judge of character, trust your instincts when meeting the new vet. ]
Thank you for sort of reinterpreting those comments for me. I get really scared of bad vets, having seen the damage they can do. But you’re absolutely right that owners often blame the vet for a dire situation that needed attention well before they were called. And thanks for having faith in me.

Under these circumstances, it's a perfect opportunity to obtain a livestock vet. It's a far better approach and less stressful to have vet care already in your toolbox, than waiting until you need vet care urgently. Good job FizzyGoats.


Slippery slope on this one. The prescription medications have became tightly controlled in recent years. Many of the OTC type medications have been pulled from the shelves due to strict regulations. I've had the same vet (pets, livestock, exotics) since 1993 and she will allow me to purchase a whole bottle of antibiotics, if it is the same one prescribed at the time of treatment. Pain meds for home use, it will be Meloxicam and only enough for treatment. Once gone, it takes a trip for me into the office and she decides whether to continue, or change courses with something different. Things like Banamine are only given as a single dose by the vet, another single dose for later if it is necessary.


Good idea, it helps towards giving him an overall impression of your management style and skills.
Ah, thanks. I figure since I only have one option, might as well get him out here before I actually need him so we have a feel for each other already and he knows my animals and the care they regularly receive. Good point on the perceptions. I might not be able to get meds from a vet and I won’t be upset if I can’t. I won’t even ask on this first visit, but maybe someday down the line, I’ll be able to keep some emergency doses of a few key meds around.
 

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Depending on how the visit is going, you could always ask about the possibility of getting RX meds at some point in the future.
"I'm thinking about if I have an emergency come up during your off hours. Would you consider letting me have a bottle of banamine to use for that?"
I was able to get my own bottle of banamine, and I haven't had to use it very often, but it sure does give me peace of mind!
 

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I think showing him your care sheet is a great idea! I hope he is open to your approach, and if not, at least open to having a conversation.
One of the things I appreciate about my vet is that he teaches me stuff. He showed me how to give an injection and then watched me do it. But I have to ask, he doesn’t always say much.
I do believe I have taught my vet a couple of things, or at least he doesn’t dismiss the “natural approach” now.
On the first visit, I asked my vet, what condition he thought each of my goats were in. I asked if my hoof trim job looked ok. I had my paper with questions in my hand, because I was nervous too, and would have forgotten everything.

To ask about Rx medicines, you could also phrase it “where would I get...?”
 

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I remember almost asking this question before my vet came out for relationship establishment. 😄 I don't really have anything to add, but I will say that the way I asked to RX items, particularly banamine, was to say that I heard that it was good to have on hand and would you be willing to sell me a bottle. Also since you are relatively far away from a vet, right? You can bring that fact up to them regarding RX items. If you can get them to sell you a bottle of penicillin now if you don't have any, that is becoming RX in a lot of places and I really wouldn't want to be without that.

Another thing that I asked my vet was what kind of mineral deficiencies does she see in the area. That helped me understand were common problems on that front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One of my questions was “Do you do emergency calls 24/7?”
Oh, good one.

I remember almost asking this question before my vet came out for relationship establishment. I don't really have anything to add, but I will say that the way I asked to RX items, particularly banamine, was to say that I heard that it was good to have on hand and would you be willing to sell me a bottle. Also since you are relatively far away from a vet, right? You can bring that fact up to them regarding RX items. If you can get them to sell you a bottle of penicillin now if you don't have any, that is becoming RX in a lot of places and I really wouldn't want to be without that.

Another thing that I asked my vet was what kind of mineral deficiencies does she see in the area. That helped me understand were common problems on that front.
I like that way of broaching the Rx topic. Thank you!

All great ideas and suggestions.
Indeed. I love this place and these awesome goat savvy people.
 

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I rarely call a vet, as we are goat vet deficient. 10 years ago, my best, favorite (always happens to the good ones) doe was in labor on Mothers Day. Unfortunately, I couldn't get the kid(s) out. Frantically (1 am) I called all the vets in the phone book. All referred me to some emergency vet clinic 90 miles away.

Finally, one vet office emergency answering service referred me to a new, young vet. She came out, her tiny hands were able to turn the kid, reposition it and 2 LIVE kids were delivered. Doe was swollen, but ok. In my book, she was a decent vet.

She was very inexperienced with goats, but was eager to learn. We developed a great vet/goat owner relationship. And she lived a few miles away. It was good. Until it wasn't.

The "experienced" goat people in the area that were really cliquey, looked down on anyone that they thought might get more goat knowledge than they had. One day someone's doe was in trouble kidding. So "A" fished around, texted people, etc. couldn't get the kid out, her friend "B" came over, more fishing, they called "C". Same story. Now the doe was failing, so they called the vet. 3 people, 4 hrs. of time and they expected the vet to save the kid and doe.

Due to her inexperience, she didn't expect the fallout. The kids were delivered, dead and had been for a few days, the doe was pretty sick. She told them the doe may not live, gave all the appropriate meds. Yes, the doe died. Naturally, they blamed the poor vet. Not the fact 3 different people were inside, or that the kids had died days previous and the doe was already going septic. Nope, they blamed the poor vet.

Thanks to Facebook and other social media sites, she was blackballed right out of business. We could have had a wonderful goat (and other animal) vet. But hateful lies ruined her. She moved to Texas, got married and works in some feral cat spay and neuter clinic.

Don't believe garbage on social media.

Good luck with your new vet. (Sorry for the book!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That’s terrible. For the vet and the animals and owners around there who lost out on the care of a good one. I’ll find out what I think of this guy soon enough.

We are supposed to get torrential rain Tuesday so I will call Monday and ask if they’d prefer to come later in the week. Since it’s not urgent and I’m not real close to them, they may not want to drive through a downpour just for a meet and greet. I figure the decent thing to do is give them the option to reschedule. If they want to come while it’s raining, that’s fine with me too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I asked the vet office if they wanted to wait and come out when it wasn’t supposed to be raining so hard. We’re in a flash flood warning until Wednesday. I’m not close to them and there’s some dangerous roads between them and me when water is pooling or rising, but they didn’t seem to mind and said as long as they could examine the goats in the barn, they’d still come out tomorrow.

I wouldn’t have minded if they wanted to wait, but at least I know they’re not scared off by bad weather.
 
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