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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went thru this earlier this summer. Just about made me go loony!
Chloe is acting weird.....AGAIN!
I went out to milk, and she is walking funny......AGAIN!
Shaking.....AGAIN!
She is behaving like her rear end is hurting her...

I immediately blended Tums and administered.
Going to go out and give a Vitamin B shot in a sec and take her temp.
She has not been eating her alfalfa pellets lately. Just hay and her grain. She leaves the alfalfa behind...

Her production went down the past month or so, drastically (we had to band her horns, because she is getting a bit too mean with them). So she has not been comfortable, and not milking well as a result (less than half a gallon a day). The horns are almost off, I am thinking a couple more weeks and they are going to be off completely.
And then recently, a few days ago, her production picked up again, she is milking a gallon a day again. Practically overnight...
Could she have milk fever AGAIN..???

I swear that goat is going to give me a HEART ATTACK.!!!
She is lucky I love her so darned much or I swear I would SELL HER.!!!

Her mother, AND her sister have NO issues. And of-course, those were the 2 that I sold, and kept Chloe. Go figure I fall in love with the 'problem' child. LoL

Here is a link to an earlier post, months ago, from the last time she scared me nearly to death!
http://www.thegoatspot.net/forum/f186/please-help-chloes-down-146967/
 

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could she be in heat? milk production drops. appitite drops...behavior changes...??
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not like this. She is acting like she is in pain in the rear, and she has the shakes. I am going to give her 3mL injection of Vit B Complex. Please someone chime in if I need to give her more!

Also heading out now to take her temp. Will be right back to post it.
I will offer the buck rag to see what she does. (just in case)

Thanks in advance guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Temp is 101.9-102 (The thermometer couldn't decide)
Gave Vit B shot.
What else am I forgetting? (I have to head back to work in less than an hour)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would start treating her for polio and listeriosis.
Clarification?
What do I do for those...?

No experience with that at all. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I honestly don't think it's polio or listeriosis. No staggering, just walking like she is in pain. Not wanting to really walk or get up and down things (like stairs) (pretty much like last time when she had milk fever). No head tilting, nothing wrong with the eyes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
She is on Biomycin right now (for any potential problems with the horn-banding). Should I switch to Penicilin? If so, how much?
I have Vit B Complex, no straight Thamine. How much Thamine does she need?
Could someone please please give me directions?
I have to go to work in half an hour, no time for research at this very moment...
 

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Thiamine needs to be higher than reg. B complex..you will have to give her 4 times the medication to have enough thiamine in her..if yours have 100 MG thiamine in it she needs 4 1/2 -5 cc per 100# every 4-6 hours

How much does she weight?.
 

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Thiamine is the only effective therapy, and treatment can result in improvement within a few hours if the disease is caught early enough. Thiamine is an inexpensive veterinary prescription. Producers should always keep thiamine on hand; the most commonly available strength is 100 mg/ml. Dosage is based on the goat's weight (4-1/2 cc per 100 pounds liveweight for 100 mg/ml thiamine) and must be given every six hours on a 24-hour cycle until all symptoms have disappeared completely to avoid relapse. Thiamine, like all B vitamins, is water soluable, so the goat eliminates daily what it doesn't utilize in the rumen. A sick goat's rumen doesn't produce B vitamins, hence the importance of adding them to the goat each day until it gets well. Initially thiamine should be given IM (into the muscle) but can be given SQ (subcutaneously) or even orally after several days of treatment. Some thiamine comes in 500 mg/ml strength, making the required dosage 1 cc per 100 pounds bodyweight. If thiamine is unavailable but the producer has injectable multiple B vitamins, check the label for how much thiamine (Vitamin B1) is present. Fortified Vitamin B Complex contains 100 mg/ml of thiamine, so the 4-1/2 cc per 100 pounds bodyweight dosage is appropriate. Injectable multiple B vitamins containing only 25mg/ml of thiamine require four times the 100mg/ml dosage (18-1/2 cc) per 100 pounds bodyweight, so the producer can quickly see the importance of obtaining the proper strength of injectable B vitamins. The key to overcoming Goat Polio is early diagnosis and treatment. Complete recovery is possible under such circumstances.
 

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There is no time to waste with Listeriosis. Recovery is more difficult and time-consuming than Goat Polio. A goat can go blind and completely recover its eyesight and overall health if proper treatment is provided; such treatment can take days or even weeks, depending upon the severity of the illness and how quickly treatment was begun.

Treatment involves administration of high doses of procaine penicillin (300,000 International Unit strength) every six hours on a 24-hour cycle up to and through 24 hours after the last symptom has disappeared to avoid relapse. Higher-than-normal dosage of procaine penicillin is needed to cross the blood brain barrier to put sufficient amounts of the antibiotic into the tissue of the goat's central nervous system. A chart of dosage by bodyweight accompanies this article. Very Important: Continue all treatment until 24 hours *after* the last symptom has disappeared to avoid a relapse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok. Leaving for work now.
It is 1:30. I am going to get off at 5:30-45.
Heading straight to the feed store afterwards for penicilin (I am almost out).
Going to treat her happy little butt for all 3. (Polio, Listeriosis and Milk Fever)

In the meantime...
I have the Fortified Vitamin B Complex (from jeffers) injectable solution for the Thiamine. Can someone PLEASE tell me how much of that I need to be shooting her with?
This way I can jump on her the moment I get back home!

THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH.!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, so keep giving about 6mL of Vit B complex every 6 hours or so... Got it, I can do that...

Also... The Penicilin...
I was just told NOT to mix Biomycin with Penicilin. I was instructed to wait a week after the last dose of Biomycin before giving Penicilin...
This was told to me by an individual who is VERY experienced with goats, so I'm weary of going against their advice...
Input?
 

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This is what I found on that...but If the B complex does seem to help..I would begin Pen ...stop the byomycin now to prepare in case..

http://www.drugs.com/vet/liquamycin-la-200.html

Since bacteriostatic drugs may interfere with the bactericidal action of penicillin, it is advisable to avoid giving Liquamycin LA-200 in conjunction with penicillin.
 

· Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Its not milk fever. Only a shot of whatever calcium the vet gives can bring a doe outta milk fever. Or at least I have never heard of anyone even coming close to saving a doe with milk fever without the calcium IV boost.
 
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