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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone use a milking machine on their goats? I have an old surge belly milker with a rebuilt pulsator that has the goat claws and inflations. The vacuum pump is a rebuilt model- works ok. (Keeps the pressure steady)

The entire thing is ok, it cuts my milking time in half or more. I am milking 5 right now and I love how it keeps the dirt out, etc. My hands like it, too!

What I hate is how heavy the milk bucket is, full and what a pain it is to wash and sanitize it in my kitchen sink!

I would like to get a new, portable vacuum pump and milker. Does anyone have one that they prefer over others?
 

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I know a couple people like the Hoegger system. I have a DP120 from Perry's Milkers. You could make it portable but it is not on wheels or anything. But the milk bucket is plastic and holds 8 gallons. I am selling my DP120 since I am down to just a couple of goats. It was much nicer to use the milking machine when I was milking 6 goats.
 

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I have a Perry's Milker too but have the DP60HD. I did buy the silicone inflations and plastic shells for it instead of the stainless steel. It works really well, the bucket is heavy but I just dump it from that into a smaller stainless steel bucket.

To clean mine I just take two buckets, put 1 gallon of plain water in one and 1 gallon of water with 1/2 cup bleach in the other (per Perry's directions) I suck up the plain water first, dump it out then suck up the bleach water second and dump that. I then take it all in the house, rinse the hoses out and hang them up, rinse the bucket out and set it aside to dry. I do wash the bucket with regular soap twice a week but otherwise the bleach water gets it pretty clean.

I did buy a plastic wash tub and attached a faucet to it that has one of those sprayer deals with it so I can rinse it out easier. The tub is deeper and much easier to use. We ran hot and cold water to it. I got it at an appliance/hardware store. It is originally made to just wash clothes in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your comments.
I may go with the Hoegger System. I am going to call them and get all the particulars. I like the small buckets!
I've also looked into the CoPulse system- but not sure about that. Darn old arthritis anyway! I should be able
to hand milk everyone!
 

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My arthritis has been acting up so bad I thought my arms were going to fall off so we just got an electric milker. We got it from Hamby. It's on sale right now for $399.00. We already had the vacume pump. I am loving it but just read on another thread that they can blow out a teat? I wonder how that can happen. I feel the machine is easier on them but again I am new to a machine. Always have milked by hand. I'm milking 4 right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Just make sure the vacuum pressure is correct and don't leave the inflations on too long. I have clear hoses and I stay right there and watch, when the milk
decreases in the lines and the udder feels empty, carefully remove the inflations from the teats- turn the vacuum off first.

Blown teats are from constant vacuum or leaving the inflations on way too long. I have a doe that blew a teat because I loaned her to someone that used a handheld constant
pressure milker on her. (a Henry Milker).She has small orifices and they wanted her to hurry up. Udder tissue ended up in her teats and her teat tissue must have burst. Now it's like milking a balloon!
(they didn't have permission to use the hand held milker, but did it anyway!) Live and learn!
 

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I use the Maggidan milker, and the trick is to go slow, and release the pressure on bump 4 or 5. I can see how they can ruin an udder if your not careful.
 

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I have a surge bucket milker... just the same as you, and I began using the wash-thru method as PTgoats45 mentioned... It was A LOT easier than hauling it in the house to clean.
I haven't used it in a while since I'm just milking one now, but when I have 4 or 5 in milk come Spring...?
 

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Thank you Goats Rock. My machine does have the clear hoses and I do stay right there as I'm afraid of what you said. I just started using it two days ago and I am finding they don't let all their milk go but in the information packet it said not to finish by hand milking or they would always hold. I certainly wouldn't want to do anything to hurt them in any way. My arthritis is bothering me so bad I had to do something but I still worry about my precious goaties!!
 

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Wow, thanks janeen128, I didn't know that!!! I thought they would get use to the machine after a few days and let all their milk go. This is my first time with the machine. I've always handmilked. I have to say, I am liking the machine but I worry so much that I'm going to cause damage to their teats or udder. ) :
 

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At hamby they told me the vacuum pressure I should use on regular sized goats, LaManchas is the same as my Jersey, 11 or 12. Is this correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
At hamby they told me the vacuum pressure I should use on regular sized goats, LaManchas is the same as my Jersey, 11 or 12. Is this correct?
That sounds about right. If you find it isn't milking well, you could decrease the pressure a tiny bit. I use 11-12 on my old unit.
 

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Thanks. It seems to be working well except I certainly get more with handmilking but I can't do that anymore. My arms and hands kill me. ) : Makes me sad cause I just feel like I have a closer relationship with my goatie girls handmilking. Just doesn't seem as personal with the machine, know what I mean? I LOVE my girls!!
 

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They will always hold back regardless when a machine is used. Hand milking completely out prevents mastitis.
I find this completely false. It depends on what the girls are used to. Ours milk out wonderful. If I have a high somatic doe I like to leave some milk in to prevent further mastitis cases. Keeping a barrier of milk in the teat is very important to girls you milk with machine, as the teat ends stay open longer. They use this barrier to keep bacteria out. Bacteria find that milk barrier and pester it instead of the good tissue and milk deeper in the udder.
 

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Interesting! I read many people on here, as well as looking up different websites online that you need to milk out to prevent mastitis. I know I don't get every drop out I'm pretty sure. I know I at least get another cup more when I hand milk out, so that is another reason why I hand milk out as well. I'm pretty new at this, and what you say makes sense too.
 

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Interesting! I read many people on here, as well as looking up different websites online that you need to milk out to prevent mastitis. I know I don't get every drop out I'm pretty sure. I know I at least get another cup more when I hand milk out, so that is another reason why I hand milk out as well. I'm pretty new at this, and what you say makes sense too.
:) milking more wet has been a huge cost saver for mastitis and health issues due to teats.
 
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