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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm a fairly new got owner and I'm just beginning to milk our doe. So my question is; hair and hey particles always fall in the milk. I've filtered the milk but now i'm concerned about bacteria from these particles in the milk. Do I have to heat the milk before consuming it?
 

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That’s where the great debate of to pasteurize or not to comes up. IMO, no I wouldn’t do so just because of that. As long as you strain it most of the hay and hair will not stay in the milk. Now another way of looking at it is, I’m not sure about you but I’m pretty sure I have consumed a great amount of hay and goat hair just running around doing chores and what not without me even realizing it. I’m still healthy ;)
BUT you do what you think you should do. It doesn’t matter what anyone says, if you would feel more comfortable consuming pasteurized milk then pasteurize it! If this makes sense to you and your comfortable drinking raw then do so. To be totally honest I’m getting ready to try my hand at pasteurizing milk this evening. I use a milk machine and although I try to keep it as clean as I can and go threw a lot of bleach I question how clean it really gets. My kids have also not been raised on raw milk and right now I don’t feel comfortable playing with it with the hospital situation going on. So whatever way you go IMO is just fine
 

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You could clip your doe of any long hair. I shave the udder with electric clippers and trim any long leg and belly hair. Then, when she is milked, just brush off any straw etc. Clean the teats well and
milk into a small, sterilized stainless steel bowl, bucket, etc. and pour the milk into a larger container after you have a small amount. That way, if she should step into your bucket, you only throw out a small amount.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's where the great debate of to pasteurize or not to comes up. IMO, no I wouldn't do so just because of that. As long as you strain it most of the hay and hair will not stay in the milk. Now another way of looking at it is, I'm not sure about you but I'm pretty sure I have consumed a great amount of hay and goat hair just running around doing chores and what not without me even realizing it. I'm still healthy ;)
BUT you do what you think you should do. It doesn't matter what anyone says, if you would feel more comfortable consuming pasteurized milk then pasteurize it! If this makes sense to you and your comfortable drinking raw then do so. To be totally honest I'm getting ready to try my hand at pasteurizing milk this evening. I use a milk machine and although I try to keep it as clean as I can and go threw a lot of bleach I question how clean it really gets. My kids have also not been raised on raw milk and right now I don't feel comfortable playing with it with the hospital situation going on. So whatever way you go IMO is just fine
Thank you so much. I've read about people getting sick and even dying from raw milk bacteria...just wondering why you are trying the pasteurization option
 

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The best option to pasteurization is quick cooling. Basically as soon as you finish filtering you put the milk into the freezer until it is below 40f then put it in the fridge. For best results it needs to cool in less than an hour, preferably less than 30 minutes, best if it can be done in 15 (usually need a good deep freeze or flash freezer for that). It will kill off most of the bacteria that you have to worry about and is the best option if you don't want to pasteurize. When I sold milk the state I lived in either required milk to be pasteurized or quick cooled properly or you would get into trouble. Just if you keep your milk in glass jars don't forget them in the freezer because it will break the jars if the milk freezes.
 

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I have a milking question! You have to pasteurize right after milking or can I put raw in fridge then come back and pasteurize later?
Preferably right after you filter is the best time to do it, I never pasteurized my milk (as the main reason I got goats was to have raw milk) but from what other goat owners I talked to said that waiting before pasteurizing often gave the milk a weird taste that it didn't get if it was done immediately. Probably because it gives time for some bacteria to grow and when the bacteria is killed it leaves a odd taste. I know my milk did the same if it didn't get cooled within a certain timeframe.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The best option to pasteurization is quick cooling. Basically as soon as you finish filtering you put the milk into the freezer until it is below 40f then put it in the fridge. For best results it needs to cool in less than an hour, preferably less than 30 minutes, best if it can be done in 15 (usually need a good deep freeze or flash freezer for that). It will kill off most of the bacteria that you have to worry about and is the best option if you don't want to pasteurize. When I sold milk the state I lived in either required milk to be pasteurized or quick cooled properly or you would get into trouble. Just if you keep your milk in glass jars don't forget them in the freezer because it will break the jars if the milk freezes.
Thank you so very much!!!
 
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