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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used a DIY-made milking stand for the last 5 years now and it's served me great but my new little doe broke it. I figured I'd check what's commercially available just for grins and it lead me to a question.

It seems like there is a difference between a milking stand and a trimming stand. Enough so that one vendor comes out with interchangeable head pieces (Don't know if the link will go through but this is one: Milking Stand for Goats and Sheep). I know that in our backyard herds, we often do things differently than "husbandry professionals" would. I used the milk stand when I wanted to trim my does' hooves and I tied my buck to a ring on the wall to do his.

What I'd like to know is if there is a reason for the difference that the vets and scientists and whoever would like us to use different stands or if it's 100% marketing fluff.

D
 

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I've used a DIY-made milking stand for the last 5 years now and it's served me great but my new little doe broke it. I figured I'd check what's commercially available just for grins and it lead me to a question.

It seems like there is a difference between a milking stand and a trimming stand. Enough so that one vendor comes out with interchangeable head pieces (Don't know if the link will go through but this is one: Milking Stand for Goats and Sheep). I know that in our backyard herds, we often do things differently than "husbandry professionals" would. I used the milk stand when I wanted to trim my does' hooves and I tied my buck to a ring on the wall to do his.

What I'd like to know is if there is a reason for the difference that the vets and scientists and whoever would like us to use different stands or if it's 100% marketing fluff.

D
I think the overall design and the company decides what the name is, but regardless of what the it's called it can basically be used for milking and trimming hooves, so I don't think vets and scientists are involved but I could be wrong.


Trimming stands, though not all of them, are frequently built like this and made from metal, the animal doesn't have a trough to eat out of and he can't move his head too much. More so used for taking pretty pictures and trimming hooves than milking, but I'm sure it can still be done if you really wanted to.
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IMO, milking stands tend to look a bit sturdier because (the one's I've seen) tend to be made of wood, with a neck gate and a feed trough and she has a bit more freedom in the neck than the one above. This can be used for milking and trimming if you wanted to.
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Not my pictures BTW.
 

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I think it's more if what each needs.. if you don't have milking stick then a work table is fine.. but when you need one table for both jobs I use a milk stand style for all needs. The problem with one like first picture in Alabama girls post is there is not food tray..now I'm not sure about your goats but mine would hunt me down in an angry fit if I didn't feed them something while working on them lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The only problem I've found when fitting goats for show, is that the milking stand is difficult to use on the head/neck area. Some stands come with interchangeable fittings, so that's something to consider.
So... the trimming table would be used mostly by people who need to groom for show, display for shows, etc for shows? It isn't "better for the goat" when trimming the backyard pets. As to what happybleats says... if I try to milk my girl without her specific brand of sweet feed, I get the evil eye. And boy can goats look evil when they want to.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Better for the goat" ???? Depends - some are fine with a fitting stand. I do always trim mine in the milk stand - including my bucks, - I train them to the stand as well for grain. Whatever is easier for your animals, and if your are not fitting, no need for the fitting headpiece.
Since I don't even know what "fitting" is :) To my novice way of thinking, it made me wonder if having the head more secure... or not secured by trapping the sides of the neck... would some how be safer. Since it's not the case, I'll just fix my milking stand and keep on keeping on. If there were some sort of health or safety issue with not using the milking headpiece for trimming, I would have made a change but since there isn't. I'm a happy little goat person.

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A fitting stand is made for clipping (shaving) and show grooming. It's very difficult to clip the neck and head with the goat's head in a milking stanchion. The fitting stand also immobilizes the head better, which is a necessity when you're trying to shave around your goat's face!

The milking stanchion is pretty self explanatory- it allows more movement and has the spot for a feed dish to keep your goat happy while you milk.

The actual body of the stand is usually the same. Just the head pieces are different, because they serve different functions. I have both, and I almost always use the milking stand. I use it when I milk, trim hooves, and insert microchips. But when I need to clip a goat, I really can't do without my fitting stand; the milking stand is a poor substitute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A fitting stand is made for clipping (shaving) and show grooming. It's very difficult to clip the neck and head with the goat's head in a milking stanchion. The fitting stand also immobilizes the head better, which is a necessity when you're trying to shave around your goat's face!

The milking stanchion is pretty self explanatory- it allows more movement and has the spot for a feed dish to keep your goat happy while you milk.

The actual body of the stand is usually the same. Just the head pieces are different, because they serve different functions. I have both, and I almost always use the milking stand. I use it when I milk, trim hooves, and insert microchips. But when I need to clip a goat, I really can't do without my fitting stand; the milking stand is a poor substitute.
Thank you! That is the exact sort of information my OCD mind was looking for!
 
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