Minerals and other supplements?

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by FarmerJen, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. FarmerJen

    FarmerJen New Member

    718
    Oct 18, 2012
    Skagit County, WA
    So... my two Nigerian does (both in milk and to be bred soon) currently get morning alfalfa, evening orchard grass, and twice daily grain (16% dairy mix - for cattle, but recommended by the person I got them from). I use Sweetlix Meatmaker loose minerals (also recommended by the person I got them from) which is offered free choice and also in the bottom of their grain dish.

    I'm seeing a lot of posts about selenium, copper, B vitamins, etc. How do I know when/if I need to use these?? My girls are a healthy weight, have good hair growth, etc. One has a chronic snotty nose, but it's not worsened even with the cold weather.

    I don't want to overload them on anything... but I don't want to hold back either, if there are things they should be getting regularly. Any advice would be appreciated.


    Also... what about worming? I don't like the use of chemical pesticides... but do use flea and worm stuff as needed on my dogs/cats. But since I'm drinking the milk... I'm not sure that the "wait till you see a problem" method is the best bet with the goats. I've had them since late July and haven't done anything thus far other than get their feet into shape. I'd rather not become the next episode of "Monsters Inside Me". :(
     
  2. FarmerJen

    FarmerJen New Member

    718
    Oct 18, 2012
    Skagit County, WA
    Nevermind on the wormers... just saw the sticky. :) Glad to know I only need to worm if they need it. Still curious on minerals though.
     

  3. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    The copper and selenium really depend on if your girls need it. I have to give selenium (BoSe) shots at least twice a year for my goats and I have to copper bolus them at least 3 times a year and they get a good free choice mineral. But that is what I need to do. You will discover over time what your girls will need. As far as the B vitamin, I only do that if needed like if they are sick or something.
     
  4. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Selenium: We give our breeding goats BoSe twice yearly...IF needed. No more than 2x. Be very careful following dosage, you can overdose goats on this. We give BoSe before breeding and before kidding. If they're slick, shiny, looking really super healthy sometimes I won't give it at all. It can be a waste if they don't need it so I look at the condition of my own goats when deciding to give it or not. All my kids get BoSe though before weaning.

    Copper: Give as needed, no more than 2-3x per year. If they start getting a red tint to their coat or it becomes dry, brittle look/feeling then usually a good time to give copper. If you have a good mineral sometimes you won't need to do this at all.
     
  5. Trickyroo

    Trickyroo New Member

    Sep 26, 2012
    New York
    Has anybody used a "goat block" before ?
    Its about the size of a cinder block I guess.....made out of minerals.
    Its the same color as the MannaPro minerals are ...

    Just saw it in the store and thought I would ask you guys about it first.
    Its fifteen dollars and it looks like it would last alot longer then the loose minerals do...
     
  6. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Is it the exact same thing? Did you look at the label? They have to do a lot more licking to get the same amount of mineral as eating the loose stuff. Plus you would have to make sure it is somewhere that it doesn't get wet or peed on.

    I have learned my lessons on feeding cheaper stuff. The vet bills or loss of animal is always higher than paying for the better feed, etc.
     
  7. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree, the blocks are not as good, I really recommend, the loose salt and minerals with selenium and copper in it.
     
  8. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I've put the goat blocks out more as an extra supplement with the minerals. They're softer than a normal salt block and my herd just eats it down like candy so I don't put them out too often or use them as an only source of minerals. Loose minerals are the way to go with goats.
     
  9. Trickyroo

    Trickyroo New Member

    Sep 26, 2012
    New York
    Thanks guys :) I figure as much. Its put out by Purina.
    I have a salt block , Billy Block, and the MannaPro loose minerals always available. But when I saw the block , I couldnt help but wonder about it...
    I guess if I got it and put it out for them it would just be as something else extra for them and something new as well.
     
  10. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Yeah basically. :thumb: Mine eat it down way faster than the minerals. I wouldn't recommend putting them out too often because they'll usually chew on the block instead of the minerals and the block does have less in it. :)
     
  11. FarmerJen

    FarmerJen New Member

    718
    Oct 18, 2012
    Skagit County, WA
    I do give a goat block sometimes too, but mine also eat it pretty fast. Also, one of the more knowledgeable people at the feed store said they'd asked the Purina folks about the nutritional value and were told that they (Purina) don't really know about goat nutrition, they just make the block because people request it. YIKES! I instantly went with Sweetlix minerals anyway, as I stay as far away from Purina as I can. I'm lucky to have a feed manufacturer nearby, so my feed is made just 15miles from my home (not the minerals obviously) AND it's cheaper. Unfortunately they still have to outsource most of their ingredients... but I still feel better about it.

    So copper and selenium are only given "as needed"... but how do I know if they need it?? How would I see "browning" on my brown goat??? I know what it looks like on my black one, cuz she had some browning left when I got her. But yeah... my other one IS brown... so????
     
  12. Trickyroo

    Trickyroo New Member

    Sep 26, 2012
    New York
    Good to know about Purina...yikes is right , that is scary !
     
  13. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    That would make sense about Purina and goat knowledge...their goat mineral is more salt than anything!

    As for the tinge to the coat. You can tell...the tips of the hair will become kind of dry and red colored. Might stick out a little unusual. A goat with enough copper and in good health will generally have a soft, shiny, sleek looking coat. A rough, dry, brittle looking or feel to the coat...many times all that goat could use is some copper. Keep plenty of quality minerals out and there may never be an issue with lack of copper.
     
  14. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I would like to say before you worry to much about giving a BoSe shot, please check your area to see if you are selenium def. I am not at all, so if I gave my goats BoSe like everyone here does, I would over dose them, so please check your area first.

    As for the SweetLix Meatmakers. In my opinion that is the best loose mineral you can get. My goats loved it, but now I cannot get it. Sure I can buy it from a dealer and pay double because of the freight, so I had to go with another mineral.

    I do have a few blocks out. I have a Cobalt block, and a trace mineral one, BUT they only use that as something to do. They eat the loose mineral. I am not sure the blocks have been touched for years.

    I also have a Bloat block out at all times.
     
  15. FarmerJen

    FarmerJen New Member

    718
    Oct 18, 2012
    Skagit County, WA
    Is a "sleek shiny" coat still expected when it's winter? My girls have fluffed out significantly. I wouldn't call their coats sleek or shiny... but they don't look super dry and brittle either - just, well, fluffy. But this makes the hair not lay flat like it does with their summer coat. Maybe I'll get some pics. Or better yet... I have a buck coming tomorrow, so I'll ask her. :) Hopefully I remember.
     
  16. I use a loose mineral by payback CHS feeds 16:8 loose mineral. It's one of the brands here, not full of salt and good amount of copper and selenium. We are very deficient in selenium here, I have a link from a USGS map of the us with selenium content. Our spring water also has a little higher iron content (which can block some of the copper) so I like the copper content in this mineral.
    Winter 'fluff' would still be pretty soft, I have a few that are total fluff balls.
     
  17. Trickyroo

    Trickyroo New Member

    Sep 26, 2012
    New York
    Sweatgoats , whats a bloat block ? I have never heard of them.
    Billy blocks , salt , mineral blocks , but no bloat block.
    I would like to get one or two for my girls.
     
  18. FarmerJen

    FarmerJen New Member

    718
    Oct 18, 2012
    Skagit County, WA
    THANKS! I googled this map... and it looks like here in the coastal PNW, we're pretty high in selenium (upper half of the chart anyway). Copper number seem pretty high too (though I dont know what number is ideal... but yeah...) so hopefully they'll get enough just by browsing (and their regular minerals).
     
  19. Mimigwen

    Mimigwen New Member

    35
    Jan 4, 2012
    so how to tell if you should dose with selenium?

    We live n Wise County Texas, the map as our selenium count as .19 as the mean.

    I've never dosed with Selenium before, this will be our second kidding season with the goats, and now I'm wondering if I should be more proactive with this. the does have access to Sweetlix meat maker loose mineral, and everyone has thick sleek winter coats. There were copper bolused on Halloween.

    How do I know if they need a Bo-Se injection? I don't want to over do it, but at the same time I don't want to be neglectful.

    They have 8 acres of browse (which is not much this time of year) lots of coastal bermuda hay and are fed MFM Goat developer in the evenings. The does are at good weight (ok one is verging on fat, but she was round when she came to us and never shed her "baby fat"), and all look like they are thriving well.

    Am I looking for trouble?

    Mary Swindell
    Boyd TX