Mini Donkeys as Protectors

Discussion in 'Precious Protectors' started by toi, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. toi

    toi New Member

    14
    May 23, 2008
    GA
    Is this something instinctual for mini donkeys to protect goats or is it something that requires training? What about dogs? Is there a special training to teach them how to protect the goats? Do mini donkeys need other mini donkeys as companions? If you know of where I can find out more info, I'd appreciate it.

    Thanks!
    Toi
     
  2. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    Mini donkeys just go after dogs/predators, it doesn't need to be taught. I know a lady who had two mini donkeys and one big donkey. No dog was safe if they weren't in their paddock. They chased this lady's dog right into her car and almost jumped into the car after it! :shocked: My miniature horse who was turned out with them also learned to go after dogs from them. So now she attacks any and all dogs around. lol

    The mini donkey's don't need companions in you have them turned out with goats. :)
     

  3. toi

    toi New Member

    14
    May 23, 2008
    GA
    Wow, that's something else that the donkeys go after dogs. I love mini donkeys and what a great excuse to get one. That is a funny story about the donkey almost jumping in the car! I would have loved to see it!
     
  4. whatknott

    whatknott New Member

    256
    Feb 22, 2008
    Pennsylvania
    not every donkey is a good protector though - mine have chased off dogs, but have also chased off a newborn goat and killed it - or have gone after a pygmy goat that they though shouldn't be in with them and will swing them around like a dishcloth. I have also had them chase my babydoll sheep and almost scalped one by grabbing it on top of its head.
    I no longer keep small animals in with my donkeys - they're with miniature horses and llamas.
     
  5. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    best to get a Jenny or castrated Jack (what are they called? geldings??) as jacks are tend to be more agressive in nature.
     
  6. whatknott

    whatknott New Member

    256
    Feb 22, 2008
    Pennsylvania
    it is my jenny that snapped the neck on a baby goat; and last year my billy goat got into their pasture by mistake, and again the jennies were trying to kill it - I have no jack. Just no guarantee on using donkeys as guard animals.
     
  7. goatheaven

    goatheaven New Member

    121
    Oct 18, 2007
    South Carolina
    We also had a mini donkey and she was aggressive with our goats especially since they are really not supposed to have very much grain. It was hard to keep her from the goats food. She would kick at the goats and I was afraid she would step on a small kid. We ended up getting rid of her. Our llama was fine with goats except he and our Nubians couldn't get along. He would spit at them. They were tall enough to reach his grain and that bothered him. I do not believe he could have protected against a pack of dogs either so we now have Great Pyrs. Luckily we were able to get a trained 6 month old the first time and she came ready to work absolutely no problems ever. We've had her 6 years. Now we have a new pyr pup and we have to introduce her slowly.
     
  8. toi

    toi New Member

    14
    May 23, 2008
    GA
    Hmmm. I guess like any other animal, you have to be careful. Thanks for your input.

    Toi
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    if you are going to purchase any animal, dog, llama or donkey - to be a guard for your goats it needs to have grown up with goats. Don't expect just because your friends donkey or dog was a good guard yours will be to. It needs to be trained and the best training is by its parent/s as it grows up.
     
  10. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    Donkeys always seem to be so iffy with me, some will protect them while others will try and kill the goats. If you can buy one that is young and raise it with the goats, or buy one that is already used to being with goats that would be the best.

    Personally though, I prefer dogs. We have 3 great pyrenees and one german shepherd and they are great protectors. We bought Cindy our oldest pyr as a trained adult and she is great with the goats. Bandit we bought as a puppy, he is part anotolian so we have had problems with him but he is getting better. I think because he is a boy he is stupider, when he was a puppy he liked to chase kids(and sometimes still does) I'd punish him but it took him a long time to stop. Our newest pyr Pearl is a really good dog, she was raised with goats and she is probably the best pyr we've had yet. She is so great with the goats, if a goat is getting picked on by the other goats, she'll stand or sit by it so the other goats leave her alone :)
     
  11. toi

    toi New Member

    14
    May 23, 2008
    GA
    I think dogs would be better for me. I've read some about the Great Pyrenees. Do they live out with the goats all the time? Can they also be pets? That's good advice to make sure they grow up with goats.

    Toi
     
  12. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    a working GP shouldn't be made a pet this interups their working focus
     
  13. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    Ditto what Stacey said. Bandit somehow got made into a pet *glares at stupid brother* so he really doesn't want to guard the goats as much as he does us.

    What I like to do is if you get an adult pyr that has or has not been with goats(rescues are good for guards too) make a pen for them inside or just outside the goat pen and make them stay in there for two weeks(letting them out to go potty of course) Eventually something just 'clicks' with them and they realize that these goats are their job to protect. Also, whenever you get a new dog, a couple times a day put it on a leash and walk around the perimeter of your property, tell them this where they are supposed to guard. When you initially let them out they will run away, always do :roll: Find them, bring them back, give them a good scolding and a smack on the rump and they usually know they have to stay home. Girls are better about this than boys.

    With puppies, as soon as you get your puppy put it in a pen inside the goat pen, or put it in the pen with the goats, but have a creep feeder type thing where he/she can get away from the goats. When your puppy gets into that playful/eating/biting stage, you have to be sure that you discipline. Smack them and scold them, be firm about it and let them know that it is NOT ok do do that.

    They can be pets to a certain point, but you shouldn't let them in your house. Pyrenees will generally be nice to their master, but other than they that will not like strangers, not to the point that they will bite them or anything like that, but they just avoid them when they are around. Our pyrenees sense when people are not nice, they will growl at the person or literally shake when they walk by them. I remember shortly after we got goats, there was a big storm and my grandma was out to look at the damage. We were on another part of the farm and she wanted to see the goats. Cindy absolutely would not let her near the goats, grandma said she just stood there growling at her. She was doing her job :)
     
  14. Suellen

    Suellen New Member

    467
    Mar 9, 2008
    Paragonah, Utah
    That is all great information. My husband and I are talking about getting something to protect our goats. I love dogs and we will probably go that direction. How are donkeys and dogs with free-grange chickens?

    Suellen
     
  15. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    I don't know about donkeys but the puppies aren't very good with chickens. THe adult dogs will growl and chase the chickens to get them away from their food. With puppies, it is VERY important to discipline them when they start eating chickens. Bandit was the hardest to break, if I ever caught him, I'd grab him by the scruff and throw him on the ground(I know it sounds bad but boy dogs you really really have to get the message through to them) and just yell at him and spit in his face. It took a couple times but eventually he stopped eating chickens. He just chases them away from his food now.
     
  16. PiccoloGoat

    PiccoloGoat goat girl x0x0

    Sep 10, 2008
    Australia
    goathappy I see where you are going
    Some guard animals arent taught right by not being handled firmly. They need a good whack for them to realise they did something wrong
    My friend Staffy doesnt feel it when you hit her so you gotta do it hard lol
     
  17. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    our pyrenees (female) is wonderful with the chickens, she will let them climb all over her, like theyre giving her a massage! but with newborns she is iffy, because she licks them alot, and they get wet, and the doe doesnt like it very much, but she was literally born with the goats, llamas, pigs etc.
     
  18. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    Q here: Is there a need for the dog (we have one guard dog) to be in the pasture with the goats? (we live up in the mountains, so we have all sorts of wild life around--- including wolves, bears and panthers.) Is one guard dog enough for about roughly 8 goats? :)