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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question:
A friend recently purchased a pure bred Nubian from 2 registered parents. We are keeping him until their house is finished. I noticed a couple of week ago that he is still really small. He is 5 months old and is only a couple inches taller, with much shorter legs, than my 10 week old pure bred Nubian kids. Is it possible for two full-sized Nubians to have a miniature?
I don’t know much about goat genetics. We are wondering if perhaps the breeder wasn’t honest or if this is actually possible.
 

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Question:
A friend recently purchased a pure bred Nubian from 2 registered parents. We are keeping him until their house is finished. I noticed a couple of week ago that he is still really small. He is 5 months old and is only a couple inches taller, with much shorter legs, than my 10 week old pure bred Nubian kids. Is it possible for two full-sized Nubians to have a miniature?
I don't know much about goat genetics. We are wondering if perhaps the breeder wasn't honest or if this is actually possible.
Not that i know of. Has the kid been tested for coccidia? Or did he have a problem with it at so e point? That can stunt growth.
 

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Well he is not disproportionate as is the case when dwarfism occurs in mammals.

Did your friend see the sire and dam and they were healthy, hearty animals?

I would check his FAMACHA score and have a fecal analysis done to check for parasites including coccidia. At what age was he weaned from milk? And what is his diet now?
 

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he does look stunted, I had a 3/4 Alpine 1/4 LaMancha wether (before I knew better) that 1: was weened two early, 2: wetherd two young, 3: must had cocci, his father was about 120-140 lbs, mom was about 100 lbs, I sold "Runty" at about 5-6 months, he was no bigger than 30 lbs, I have sworn NEVER to do that again, that was a long time ago, we all make mistakes
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
13F39A75-56B4-4229-BB3E-6813094CA70F.jpeg
Well he is not disproportionate as is the case when dwarfism occurs in mammals.

Did your friend see the sire and dam and they were healthy, hearty animals?

I would check his FAMACHA score and have a fecal analysis done to check for parasites including coccidia. At what age was he weaned from milk? And what is his diet now?
She saw the damn in person as well as his brothers. She never saw the siren person. They all seemed healthy. My vet said he was healthy. He was weaned at 10 weeks.He eats what the rest of my goats eat. Forage, hat and occasionally alfalfa pellets. We don't do any grain for them. Here's another picture I got today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
He’a a really sweet goat and very pretty. They aren’t unhappy with him but are trying to figure out what they got! Haha. They plan to keep him, but probably not breed him.
 

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sometimes the stunted/small ones are the best pets!!! I have one now that is small (an oops breeding doe to full brother) he is the best, Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well he is not disproportionate as is the case when dwarfism occurs in mammals.

Did your friend see the sire and dam and they were healthy, hearty animals?

I would check his FAMACHA score and have a fecal analysis done to check for parasites including coccidia. At what age was he weaned from milk? And what is his diet now?
She saw the damn in person as well as his brothers. She never saw the siren person. They all seemed healthy. My vet said he was healthy. He was weaned at 10 weeks.
 
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