Moonspots?

Discussion in 'Mini Mania' started by Sonrise Farm, Dec 17, 2008.

  1. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    What are the genetic ties with moonspots? Is it like the genetic tie of blue eyes? How is it passed along, etc?
     
  2. Amos

    Amos New Member

    Oct 2, 2008
    Minnesota
    I've heard frosted and belted bred together create moonspots?
     

  3. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    428
    Oct 7, 2007
    It's supposed to be dominate, you have to have it to get it (similar to blue eyes).
     
  4. HollowbeadRanch

    HollowbeadRanch New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    NW Alabama
    This is what I have been told as well. One of the parents has to have moonspots for the offspring to have moonspots. I don't know alot about the genetics of it, but Tina (Laurel_Haven) might be able to tell you a little more about it :shrug: The majority of her herd has moonspots :greengrin:
     
  5. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Either the sire or the dam has to have them, but even if both sire and dam have them it is possible to not get them, but that kid would have a VERY good chance to pass on moonspots if bred to another moonspotted goat...hope that made sense. I think some goats are more dominant in carrying the gene and others aren't. They tends to be very dominant when both parents are moonspotted and the resulting kid is moonspotted. I have a moonspotted buck that I have used on some of my does, but this is the first time using him so I don't know what he'll throw...i'm excited to see.
     
  6. jordan

    jordan Fall Creek Farm

    52
    Nov 22, 2007
    Wisconsin
    They don't nessessarily have to have them to throw them. I have a dark buckskin buck who throws them pretty regularly as does his sire (who doesn't have them either). I think the genetics just have to be there, though if they have them it's not going to be as much of a crap shoot.
    Lois
    http://www.fallcreekfarm.net
     
  7. Laurel_Haven

    Laurel_Haven New Member

    768
    Oct 19, 2007
    South Carolina
    It is like the blue eyed gene trait. At least one parent must have moonspots to pass them onto the offspring.
    Some tend to think this is not true because they don't see monspots on say the sire who is throwing them... but he does have them, it may just be one single hair of a moonspot. But he has it. So yes, the dam or sire must have moonspots to be passed on.

    A great example is my buck Caesar's Villa STS Sharpie, I for the longest time didn't even know that he had moonspots. To me he is black with white. But then he started throwing all these heavily moonspotted kids out of nowhere. Now I knew his sire sported them and others throughout his pedigree but couldn't find any on Sharpie himself. But I was told by a very knowledgeable breeder that he has to have them to throw them even if it is a single hair. Well the first time I shaved him down, I found them, about 5 single hairs that produced a lighter shade of grey. So even though it was not visiable on his full black & white pattern he had one hidden and throws lots of those spots. Same really goes for my other sire Rocky... he does look to have them, he is gold & white, but once clipped they are visiable. So I sort of stumbled unknowingly into the moonspots I get today. :thumbup:
     
  8. HollowbeadRanch

    HollowbeadRanch New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    NW Alabama
    That's what I had thought. And yes, I have seen a few bucks that have moonspots that you couldn't see until they were shaved. I have also seen a few breeders who post pics of their bucks in full coat and a pic of them shaved to show that they DO have moonspots under all that fluff :greengrin:

    BTW, Tina, do you know of any good websites that tell ALOT about moonspots? I have had alot of people ask me for more info but I haven't been able to find any :shrug:
     
  9. SDK

    SDK New Member

    Jun 26, 2008
    Yucaipa ca

    my blue eyed buck has about 10 silver hairs.. at first i thought they were just a white spot.. but its a moonspot.. funny how these things are
     
  10. Laurel_Haven

    Laurel_Haven New Member

    768
    Oct 19, 2007
    South Carolina
    You know Brandi, I haven't come across a good article yet that really gets in detail about moonspots. There is so much to learn about them and maybe now that they are becoming more and more popular someone will invest the time to study them more. Afterall it is a color trait that it popping up more than ever.

    The facts I do know about moonspots (which correctly is actualy moon spots) has been passed on to me by another, so this much I do know:
    Moon spotting is presumed to be a dominant trait. That means one parent must have moon spots in order for the kids to have moon spots.
    Now, there are cases where goats have produced moon spotted kids, and neither parent has apparent moon spots. In those cases, the presumption is that at least one of the parents is moon spotted, but the moon spot(s) on that parent are so small, or so insignificant, that they go un-noticed. Meaning it may just be one single strand of hair.
    The genes for frosting and belting have nothing to do with moon spots at all. In fact, NO OTHER GENE has anything to do with moon spots. It is a separate gene. Moon spots can appear on a goat of any color or pattern, and can occur in conjunction with any other spotting factor, etc.
    That is pretty much all I have been told about moonspotting. But they sure are nice to look at! :thumbup:
     
  11. Crissa

    Crissa New Member

    Oct 7, 2007
    Cashion, Oklahoma
    This is a cool thread. I love spots. :greengrin:

    So are Lyrae, Orion and Chase moon spotted? Or are they just spots?

    What's funny is Lyric's dam and sire were BOTH spotted but Lyric has no "obvious" spots.
    Lyric's mom. (in the middle)
    [​IMG]

    And here's a link to her sire.
    http://bar6diamondranch.com/Henry'spedigree.html
     
  12. Amos

    Amos New Member

    Oct 2, 2008
    Minnesota
    Thank you for clearing that up Tina! I have four does with moon spots so it will be interesting to see how the offspring turn out.
     
  13. HollowbeadRanch

    HollowbeadRanch New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    NW Alabama
    Thanks Tina! I knew I hadn't been able to find anything on it, but thought you might have come across something over the years. Like you said, maybe someone will do a study on them soon!
     
  14. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    428
    Oct 7, 2007
    Lyrae, Orion, and Chase are moon spotted. I love them! I'd like to have a brown spotted nubian!

    It's true that one can have the smallest, almost invisible spot, and throw kids that are covered. I have a black nubian wether, both parents are heavily moon spotted, Onyx appears solid black, but right along his spine he has a group of red hairs, probably about 10 and I've always wondered if that may actually be a moon spot, but since I wethered him I'll never know.
     
  15. Crissa

    Crissa New Member

    Oct 7, 2007
    Cashion, Oklahoma
    Thanks Haviris! I love 'em. If Lyrae gives me another buckling I'll let ya know. :wink: hehe.
     
  16. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    So, a white goat can have them? I have been told different things and read different things, so quite frankly, I'm lost on moon spots. I was told Leona doesn't have them, but I think she does, under her chin. It's a distinctly different color than her other "pinto spots." But what do I know?? :shrug: Her sire was heavily moon spotted but did not throw them as often to his kids.
     
  17. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    428
    Oct 7, 2007
    I'd love one marked just like Orion he's beautiful!

    I don't know if a white goat can have them, I've been told no, but I'm wondering, why not? I think I remember you posted a pic of Leona's "possible" moon spot and I still say that it is!
     
  18. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I've found this to be a pretty good informational website... http://www.goatspots.com/moonspots.htm and the pictures are fun to look at! :shocked: Some of those goats have some VERY unique markings!
     
  19. Amos

    Amos New Member

    Oct 2, 2008
    Minnesota
  20. jordan

    jordan Fall Creek Farm

    52
    Nov 22, 2007
    Wisconsin
    I beg to disagree that an animal has to have them to throw them. I believe that if they are in the genetics, they can pop up from time to time.
    The pic below is of my buckskin that throws them. He has frosting on his muzzle and ears, a white strip by his right front leg and the white patch on his side. There is not even a few hairs of white, black or brown anywhere else out of pattern either in full hair or clipped down to the skin. His father is the same way.

    [attachment=1:3sc0b2bd]tn_legend63007.jpg[/attachment:3sc0b2bd]

    A white based animal can have moonspots as well. The doeling below has about 20 tan moonspots that don't show up well in this picture. She is out of black moon spotted doe and a white and red buck.

    [attachment=0:3sc0b2bd]tn_pearl60108.jpg[/attachment:3sc0b2bd]

    Though many claim that Brush Creek Russel (a com reg foundation buck of unknown parentage) was the first moon spotted ND, Sandra Mason of Brush Creek always said he wasn't and if I recall correctly, she said ND moon spots first made their appearance in the Caesar's Villa herd.

    However they came to be, or however anyone wishes to explain them, I plan on just enjoying them when they show up :love:
    Lois
    http://www.fallcreekfarm.net
     

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