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good job on the jinker :thumb:

just a pointer though, your shafts are too low and so is the breastplate, they need to be brought up a bit, for the comfort of the goat
 

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owned by goats
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yep, the breastplate is where she puts all her weight to pull the cart, so that needs to be up higher for her to really lean her weight into it and pull hard; though not too high that it affects her breathing. there should be a strap that goes from the breastplate over the shoulders/neck of the goat - you should be able to tighten that to bring the breastplate up higher. you might have to put some extra holes in it.

the shafts as they are at the moment place a LOT of weight on her back by pulling the saddle down, if they are up higher they wont pull so much on the saddle. you can raise the shafts by bringing the tug loops up higher - again, you may have to add more holes. Also, you may have to consider the balance of your cart.

Here is an interesting bit of information about the balance of a cart and the position of shafts in the tugs:

A two-wheeled cart must fit the horse properly and be well-balanced so that the horse does not carry too much weight on the saddle from the downward pressure of the shafts. Contrary to what most people think, there is actually minimal weight on the horse's back when pulling a properly balanced cart.

To test the balance of a cart, have one person sit in the cart while another person holds the shafts level at the tip of the shaft. (This should be the same height that the shafts will rest in the tugs when the horse is hitched.) If the cart is balanced, the cart will be so light in your hands that you can actually hold it in place with just one finger.

"In a properly balanced cart, the shafts will rest lightly on the bottom of the tug or may even float in the middle of the tug," explains Seaton. "A little weight on the horse's back isn't a bad thing, but too much weight will make the horse sore and the cart will 'thump' up and down uncomfortably with the motion of the horse's movement."

She explains that it is also undesirable to have the shafts pushing against the top of the tug. In this instance, the weight of the cart is being applied to the belly via the girth, instead of the back, and can again cause discomfort to the horse.

In a two-wheeled cart, the driver can impact the balance of the cart by changing their body position. By leaning forward slightly, the additional weight will cause the shafts to go down and by leaning backwards the shafts will go up. A good driver can make subtle changes in his body position to help the cart stay balanced when going up and down hills, however, this is no substitute to remedy an ill-fitting cart.
Source: http://equine.uber.matchbin.com/pages/f ... eft&open=&
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the reply keren. I believe we have it all fixed now. I adjusted the shaft loops and the breastcollar just as you said, so hopefully it will fit right. I will try it out tomorrow evening as it was getting late tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FunnyRiverFarm said:
Wow...it looks like she taking to her training really well! :thumbup:
She is. The first time we hooked her up, Sunday, she did not even try to bolt or jump. Right now though I am just walking in front of her while she gets used to the cart, but later this week I will probably try to walk behind her while she pulls the cart.
 

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I love looking at pictures of cart goats and knowing that other people actually are training and using them for that. I want to train a cart goat in the future but that could be years and years away ... if ever. So, I like to live vicariously through others. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cinder said:
I love looking at pictures of cart goats and knowing that other people actually are training and using them for that. I want to train a cart goat in the future but that could be years and years away ... if ever. So, I like to live vicariously through others. :)
I do that with your guys' dairy goats. We don't have enough room for a whole herd of goats, just four at most. I do still enjoy having them though and training them to be cart goats. Oh, and maybe someday I will move to a larger place and get some dairy goats of my own.
 
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