The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Goat Mentor
Joined
·
7,391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have so much mud! So much rain and goats trampling down paths = mud. What surrounds our barn is mud and then there is a path of mud to the gate. Recently, the only thing to do has been to put pine shavings down when it rains so it doesn’t turn into a mudslide! (I know, right?) this gets super expensive and wasteful and I’m also concerned about it affecting the PH of our soil (acidic soil can lead to more snails which means more worms). Overall, I just need some ideas on what I can put down on some of these paths where there is a lot of mud. I would love to be able to have grass there but I don’t see it as much of a possibility. I’m honestly considering putting some more paving tiles down and giving them a cement walkway. But this is a major hassle as they weigh a ton, and we are sure to never have grass there again! Stone dust is a possibility but we can’t get it professionally put down so we can toss some bags of it down and stomp it as best we can, but it won’t last for too long. I could put sand down, but that seems like it would get pretty yuck and I don’t know if goats can be on sand. Please help! It’s becoming a safety hazard for both humans and goats... it’s like a slip n’ slide!! Thank you!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,064 Posts
I empathize. My husband just had to pull apart our rotting deck to make a temporary parking (barge?) to keep our car from sinking into the mud. In the past we have done the shavings and straw and stepping stones and 2X4 walkways. Anything to keep us and the livestock above the mud.
Sorry I do not have any helpful advice. Best of luck to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,199 Posts
Any chance you can get your hands on free wood pallets and make an temporary elevated walkway in the worst areas? If you can't get solid surface pallets, remove slats from one pallet to make a solid surface on another.

I hate adding wood chips, hay, or shavings to any muddy area as it ultimately just is more organic materials to make MORE mud and more cleanup later.

If you do choose to spend money on stone dust, buy a roll of geotextile fabric too and spend the time to strip the topsoil before placing the fabric then stone dust.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
14,760 Posts
Oh let me tell you I totally understand! OMG it's been so bad. We were supposed to fix our problems months ago and couldn't get my husband motivated you know... when we were in a 39 day drought and conditions were great for working on the issues. We have drainage issues because of unlevel ground, and a creek that runs through the middle of our small place (2-2+ acres that are long/narrow)

It's hard to know what you should do given we don't know the lay of your land. Any drainage issues or just busy walkway issues?
Maybe look into laying large stepping stones and make walkways for the heavy traffic areas? You can get the large square stepping stones at hardware stores - Lowes, Home Depot, etc. They work really well unless you have really deep mud that they would just sink in. Or find something you can put under to keep them from sinking in.

We just installed #2 gravel around our barn, doe shelter, and plan on doing the rest of the back of the barn, and out in the grassy area where we're having drainage/mud issues - need to finish making drainage ditches before we fill in with gravel. But I will say so far, I am thankful for the gravel. After 3"+ of rain yesterday, I couldn't imagine trying to get to the barn and gate in the mud. We have a long way to go, but it'll get there!

Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,833 Posts
We had that problem here in the fall. I did the pallets, until I could get a couple of yards of 1/4 inch limestone gravel to fill in the low areas. It kept their feet dry and also works well for cleaning up poops (when it’s not raining). The leftovers make a little hill to run up on. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,606 Posts
Ugh it’s terrible here this year too. It’s going to be a long winter. I’m going to do the stepping stones. I have a bunch of dead trees so just going to cut a bunch of rounds maybe 6” long and at least make some paths to and from the major areas, feeders. I thought about gravel or asphalt grindings (there’s a bunch free here right now) but I’m not sure how that would work out with raking poop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
We are dealing with the same thing here. It's terrible!

A few weeks ago I placed an order for 18 tons of chapel hill grit (like crush' n run) and have been moving it by hand into the muddy areas. It's work, but worth it. I've so far moved 1/3 to 1/2 the of it into the goat areas. It is so worth it! It packs down like concrete overtime and can be swept and raked. Old hay sits on top and can be shoveled. I actually gently pressure washed one of the paths today (I had gotten behind on sweeping- it rained so at that point it was fast for me to do)

It has made a huge difference. Goats are coming up for milking with clean udders, I can give them grain without having to walk through ankle deep mud and the goats love to hang out on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
@NigerianDwarfOwner707

Here's a pic of one of the path's I just put down. The mud was horrible! This is a high traffic path, it just tears the ground up. Even this little strip is making a huge difference!

ETA- please excuse the mess. The panels were to keep the goats away while I moved the grit.
IMG_5668.JPG
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,674 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
842 Posts
We use stall mats in some areas coming in and out of the barn. I’ve also seen 2x10 boards used to create a temporary walkway and the goats like walking on the boards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Wow..thats a neat idea. Would it help keep the hooves filed also? Is it rough texture?
Once packed it is like concrete. I haven't noticed it helping keep the hoof growth down, but the hooves are healthier because they aren't walking through mud.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Once packed it is like concrete. I haven't noticed it helping keep the hoof growth down, but the hooves are healthier because they aren't walking through mud.
Hi Goat Whisperer...
Your path looks great!! I've never heard of "crush-and-run"...where do you get it and...is it as expensive as gravel..?

Our place is one giant puddle/swamp right now and I'd love to have some dry areas and paths.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Hi Goat Whisperer...
Your path looks great!! I've never heard of "crush-and-run"...where do you get it and...is it as expensive as gravel..?

Our place is one giant puddle/swamp right now and I'd love to have some dry areas and paths.
I buy from a local farm/fertilizer/ landscaping business, but you can research rock quarries in you area and see if they have anything suitable. Many horse farms use some time of fine gravel/grit in their stalls and high traffic areas. I'd ask around and see if they have any recommendations, chances are they do.

This last load was $267 for an entire dump truck load, delivery included (they are so close the delivery fee is minimal). Two years ago I paid $130/load but the price has gone up. Either way, it's worth the money!

Also, if you check FB market place and Craigslist you might be able to find businesses advertising rock or gravel. If they don't have what you want, they'll probably know someone who does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
We get get free chip from a local tree guy. As other stated ultimately that just gives you more work once it decomposes. Creating a hard surface is the only option at ground level. As other stated using flat sided pallets for raised walkways (or logs) is helpful.

In their shelter I put down flat sided pallets with scrap linoleum on top, that way at least their shelter has a hard non porous surface that that can be easily cleaned.
 

·
Registered
Goat Mentor
Joined
·
7,391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I can try and get some pics of our situation. But it’s both a mix of poor drainage and walking paths. Drainage issues getting fixed this spring, that’s our project! For now, I just gotta fix the muddy areas. Pallets won’t work. Stepping stones I’m considering. Logs, no. My goats are sissies and won’t like the texture of that.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top