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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bea is not in milk now. She's been with a buck since December and while all her other herd sisters are starting to look plumper, she still looks underweight and doesn't have a nice shiny coat like the rest. A month or so ago, I noticed she wasn't looking that great (just a little thin) so I wormed her with a pellet wormer, and added Sweetlix Meatmaker in addition to the Purina loose mineral available. Her body condition improved a little. Then two weeks ago I notice hair missing on her eyebrows, but I saw her rubbing her head on a branch and thought she just rubbed it a little bare. Then a few days ago I noticed this patch on her shoulder. That pinkish looking area is her skin, then yesterday her neck had barely any fur.

This is what I'm thinking about doing for treatment, and I just wanted to know if my dosing, and combination is correct. Plus would like any other suggestions. (No One else has this issue!!)

Plan of attack:
Copper Bolus
Pour on Ivermectin (on the skin)
Safeguard (orally)

Now here's where I get confused, I see a lot of people write the proper dose is 1cc per 10 lb. 3 days in a row. However the packaging says 2.9cc Per 100 lbs. redo in 4-6 weeks. That's a huge difference. We're talking an additional 10cc dose. each time three days in a row.

I just want to make sure which is correct. And also to double check that the combo of the Pour on Ivermectin and Safeguard are okay.

Thanks in advance.

Eye Working animal Tree Dog breed Goat
 

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Oh the poor thing.

ksalvagno is right about the fecal. Know your enemy. She's right about the dosing, too. But you have to find out if Safeguard will kill what you have.

Yes to the pour on, right away.

Pelletized wormer is no good, and worse, it fools you into thinking you have wormed them.

Good luck. You can beat this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the responses. I have never used safe-guard in my herd or 10 years of goating actually. I will go ahead and do the copper bolus and pour on... Does anyone see any problem with the combination of all three? Or should I let the copper and pour on go for a bit, and then see? I get the fecal concept, but since I'm not a regular de-wormer (it's really not been an issue here) Cocci has only been an issue once or twice at our old farm, and we've since moved to a new completely unfarmed area.
 

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I second that the pellet wormer probably did nothing for her. It is completely useless for me. If it's the same one I used, the "active ingredient" is DE or diatomaceous earth. This is the silicon-based exoskeletons of ancient single-cell organisms. This fine grit is generally harmless to tough mammalian skin and intestinal linings, but is very sharp and cuts easily through the outer membranes of microscopic worms. In dry conditions, this makes the worms dry out and die (like killing garden pests in their larval stage by sprinkling the ground around your plants). In nice moist or wet conditions (like your goat's intestines, or a wet day in your garden soil), it has zero effect because they cannot desiccate before healing.

If you used a different one, I don't know.

Also, I'm trying to criticize, just inform here. If you don't know what parasites you might be dealing with, you have no idea what wormer to use. There are parasites who have no reaction to Safeguard or Ivermectin and their relatives. It's not that they are resistant from overuse of the antiparasitics (which I applaud you for avoiding overuse), it's that they are a different species that requires different drugs to kill. I personally would know my enemy first, then treat, so I don't waste time watching to see if the dewormer worked while the animal continues to lose condition, and so I don't waste money on a dewormer that is useless to me.
 

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Unless you actually see lice when you part her fur, I would not use the Pour-On Ivermectin. If there are no external parasites, it's just an unnecessary chemical load on her body!

She has adorable markings!
Definitely do the copper bolus. At least 4 grams (I usually give more to my full size does... 8 grams)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I second that the pellet wormer probably did nothing for her. It is completely useless for me. If it's the same one I used, the "active ingredient" is DE or diatomaceous earth. This is the silicon-based exoskeletons of ancient single-cell organisms. This fine grit is generally harmless to tough mammalian skin and intestinal linings, but is very sharp and cuts easily through the outer membranes of microscopic worms. In dry conditions, this makes the worms dry out and die (like killing garden pests in their larval stage by sprinkling the ground around your plants). In nice moist or wet conditions (like your goat's intestines, or a wet day in your garden soil), it has zero effect because they cannot desiccate before healing.

If you used a different one, I don't know.

Also, I'm trying to criticize, just inform here. If you don't know what parasites you might be dealing with, you have no idea what wormer to use. There are parasites who have no reaction to Safeguard or Ivermectin and their relatives. It's not that they are resistant from overuse of the antiparasitics (which I applaud you for avoiding overuse), it's that they are a different species that requires different drugs to kill. I personally would know my enemy first, then treat, so I don't waste time watching to see if the dewormer worked while the animal continues to lose condition, and so I don't waste money on a dewormer that is useless to me.
This pelleted wormer did have a medicine in it... The pellet is called Goat Care 2x

https://www.bing.com/images/search?...qpvt=morantel+tartrate+goat+wormer&ajaxhist=0

I completely understand what you, and everyone else is saying about getting a fecal done. My nearest goat vet is 45 minutes one way. And at this moment in time I don't have the time to run down there. I wonder where else I could get this looked at. Maybe I can call my dogs vet and see if they can run a fecal. Should be able to right? He's only 3 minutes away and much more accessible to my current time constraints.
 

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I have used it and it was recommended to me by someone here who uses it regularly to deal with zinc issues. I can't say whether it helped me or did not help me. It did not hurt me. I added it to a bag of minerals over the summer. I've not added it since then.
TruCare.
 

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Where I am, if something supposedly for worms says "Pellets" or "Safeguard" I don't even pause to consider it. Tapes are supposed to still be susceptible to Safeguard, but they aren't here. You are very blessed if it still works for you, as is everyone here who can use it.
 

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I have heard of dog vets willing to look at a fecal and tell you what parasites are there. Mine won't, but they just lost their livestock vet and are trying to establish themselves as a companion animal only practice, so they are being extra strict. They might not feel comfortable telling you what dewormer to use if they don't see livestock, but looking at poop is looking at poop. They use the same technique when they check dogs/cats for intestinal parasites. Once you know what's there, you can look up what fights it, or can call your goat vet for advice.
 
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I am going through the same thing! My doe starting losing hair on face then after a week she was losing hair on her legs and back. After doing extensive research and reading a crazy amount of blogs and advice, it looks like my girl has a copper deficiency that led to mites! ugh. Again, I read up on it and this is what I have done to eradicate these mites with some success.

-copper bolous and changed up loose mineral to make it more appetizing.
- dosed all goats with subcutaneous ivermectin (twice, 10 days apart). Not sure if it really helped, because it made her skin even flakier!
-washed her with a medicated shampoo (in the house! due to the cold), sprayed her with 5% permithin (once so far, will do it again in 12 days),\
- brushing her every day and treating her bare spots with coconut Vaseline to smother any existing mites and to protect her skin in this harsh weather.
Her bare spots are looking better after two weeks. But still flakey skin.
-I also read equal parts of neem oil and olive oil applied to skin will kill and prevent mites and help soothe dry skin, so yesterday I washed her again, and applied the oil all over her. Which definitely made her feel better.
- I have also meticulously cleaned their barn several times this month and sprayed it down with permithin and put DE down.

After 2 and half weeks, she looks better! She has bare spots still, but no scas, no rough skin. Her dandruff is going away as well.

After all of this, I have also read, that these mites will usually go away on their own in the summer after being clipped and they are out in the sun. But, being in Maine, it doesn't warm up until May. I had to do something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I am going through the same thing! My doe starting losing hair on face then after a week she was losing hair on her legs and back. After doing extensive research and reading a crazy amount of blogs and advice, it looks like my girl has a copper deficiency that led to mites! ugh. Again, I read up on it and this is what I have done to eradicate these mites with some success.

-copper bolous and changed up loose mineral to make it more appetizing.
- dosed all goats with subcutaneous ivermectin (twice, 10 days apart). Not sure if it really helped, because it made her skin even flakier!
-washed her with a medicated shampoo (in the house! due to the cold), sprayed her with 5% permithin (once so far, will do it again in 12 days),\
- brushing her every day and treating her bare spots with coconut Vaseline to smother any existing mites and to protect her skin in this harsh weather.
Her bare spots are looking better after two weeks. But still flakey skin.
-I also read equal parts of neem oil and olive oil applied to skin will kill and prevent mites and help soothe dry skin, so yesterday I washed her again, and applied the oil all over her. Which definitely made her feel better.
- I have also meticulously cleaned their barn several times this month and sprayed it down with permithin and put DE down.

After 2 and half weeks, she looks better! She has bare spots still, but no scas, no rough skin. Her dandruff is going away as well.

After all of this, I have also read, that these mites will usually go away on their own in the summer after being clipped and they are out in the sun. But, being in Maine, it doesn't warm up until May. I had to do something.
I opted that this was not mites as I could see no evidence in the other animals. I do have others with dry skin though soo looking more into mineral deficiency. Nice work on your treatments! I'm glad she is looking better!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I just wanted to update that I had a breakthrough moment!!! Another gal posted on a fb group about the same thing happening to her goat. The coincidence was that we both had changes in water. (I remembered that the I was using a hose from the water softener in the summer, and switched to the well in the winter) She had just had her water softener tank replaced and switched the salts... I also just switched salts and noticed a red ring in my toilets. That tells me that the well water is high in Iron. AND Iron just happens to block absorption of Copper and Zinc!!!! I'm jumping up and down right now... I finally figured out what is causing this. Now I know how to fix it!!
 
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