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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We're almost moved back into my old home (previous renters moved out), and we got Demon and Magnum moved in yesterday. Magnum is his same old attention-desperate self and Demon has come a LONG way from his initial aggression. He will come up to you, but will not accept being touched. He looks like he's growing up nicely, considering he's only 6-7 months old. His sire was 100% CODI breeding, and his dam is a registered fullblood, so hopefully we'll get papers on him soon.

I also have the chance to purchase an unregistered half nigerian half alpine doe. The only problem is she's CAE positive. She would be kept separate from everyone and all kids, buck or doe, would be freezer-bait. She's $150, think she'd be worth it? She's super-sweet and was a former recip doe, so she has no problems breeding and nursing multiples, and she produces enough to milk on the side.

I know he's not well set up (or set up at all....uncooperative git), but any opinions? Think I got a good one this time? He only cost me a couple months of hoof trimming and his two half brothers butchered out nicely.

(Yes, Magnum is tethered, it's a temporary set-up until the fence is him-proofed)





 

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I personally wouldn't drink milk from a CAE+ doe. JMO.
 

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www.wildheartsranch.org
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No. If a doe I already had and liked came up CAE positive I might go through the extra effort to keep her, but I would never buy one that was. You can easily find a decent quality, healthy grade doe for that price.
 

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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I may pull doe kids if they're worth keeping, but triple breed goats generally don't sell for much, especially half dairy half boer, regardless of their conformation (and she's got GOOD conformation. Downhill, flat level back, level hip, great legs, nice wide and deep). I know all the CAE prevention protocols and technically I've been taking care of her for a month now. I just hate to see her flung right back into breeding CAE positive show goats or worse, sent to the butcher. The $150 is her original purchase price, and is the same price I would pay for any other grade goat without a known CAE status (who will all have the exact same chance of having it since grade breeders don't test and don't care) and without the same milking ability and conformation.
 

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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry, I meant they have the same chance as she did prior to testing. CAE is seen as nothing worth worrying about. Nobody tests, nobody asks, nobody tells you. It's a "nothing" disease, which is why so many come up positive when they finally do get tested. I know this doe has raised breeding stock before (she was a recip doe for fullblood boer embryos) and not one was raised on prevention. Good breeders who register will often test and are upfront about it, but a grade doe is likely to come from a similar situation. The way we're planning right now, we will have tested and registered stock with one or two unregistered does to put meat in the freezer.
 

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www.wildheartsranch.org
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If the rest of your stock will be tested negative, you might as well have clean unregistered does as well so you don't have to complicate things. I bet most responsible owners with grade stock would let you draw blood and have it tested if you're considering buying their doe.
 

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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can certainly try, but I haven't had much luck with it in the past. I'm still on the fence about it, but I have until the end of January to figure out if and how I can properly separate her and if my roommates want to set up and follow protocols. If we decide it's going to be too expensive to get her her own pen and equipment, we will likely pass. I've just grown very attached to her as she's the only goat that will come up to you and just sit there accepting cuddles (it doesn't help that I'm working my butt off trying to bring her back around from a mystery disease. She hasn't eaten in 3 days, not even hay). I know she's more susceptible to it because of the CAE, but still. Hard not to get attached when you're sitting with her for a half an hour at a time watching to make sure she doesn't get worse.
 

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Shady Acre Homestead
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I'd like to say I would never keep a CAE + goat, but I have never been in the situation you are...my goats are still untested :hair: so I may be when I do ..:( (I want to but it will have to wait til spring now with heating costs)
That said,I say go with your heart....educate yourself on the disease and weigh it out for your situation.
Sorry you are having to go through this...:hug:

ETA:I would not purchase one already positive,however if my herd was clean.
 

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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have no guarantees my two boys are clean. Yes, they are from closed herds but so was Milky Way (nubian doe I bought a few years back) and she tested positive. We'll be officially testing regularly come next year (well before we bring in new goats), but as I said, it's just not seen as a big deal here and you're likely to run into it, at least locally.
 

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The Hoofcare and Repro specialist
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If things go the way I want them to go, I will have a tested and CL vaccinated herd by next breeding season. Hopefully I'll have Magnum castrated by then (gonna be awful hard to convince my roommate to do it) and a boer doe or two to keep Demon occupied.
 
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