The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I started a new thread again. My another goat is in labor. I thought she had a miscarrying about more than month ago. This morning she had discharged some red fluid. From 1pm she started to have contractions more often. Three hours have passed she has not delivered. She has a little red fluid discharge at every contraction. Is it normal ? How long the contractions can last before delivery?
 

·
Registered
Kinder Goat Breeder
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
When my doe gave birth she started having contractions at 9:00 pm and started really pushing at 11:00 and then gave birth to her first baby at 12:00 am. If she'd not really pushing yet (full body involved) I don't think you need to worry yet, but I'll call some more experienced people.

@GoofyGoat @toth boer goats @ksalvagno @SalteyLove
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
You should see kids on the ground 30-40 minutes after they start pushing. If she’s having contractions and not pushing after this long it would be wise to call a vet. It could mean a kid is in the wrong position or other problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Bummer again on me. Twins, First one is mature, breaching position. I pulled it out. It is dead. The vet arrived and went in and pulled the second one, not well-developed. So two stillborn kids. I totally have 4 goats. On January 15 Rose delivered healthy twins. I missed her delivery because I didn’t notice the signs of her labor and went to the grocery. When I got home she had finished the delivery. Today this doe is 49. She did the same thing as 104. These two doe’s were bought from the farm in Beaver Utah. Now I have Maggie. She will be ready within one week. I can’t feel her ligaments now. I pray Maggie will be going well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,494 Posts
I'm sorry you lost them. :(

For future reference, when you see any red or amber liquid coming out with contractions, babies should shortly follow. If only liquid goo keeps coming, it's time to reach in and start feeling for kids. Once that water breaks you should have kids on the ground within an hour. Red-tinged discharge never happens until labor has started and kids are imminent. Things should happen very quickly after that.

I hope your next kidding goes like clockwork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
When 49 pushed a little blood came out. At first it was dark blood and when it was close to delivery the blood was red. On the internet some articles say breaching position is rare. Why the rare occasion happened to my goats quite often?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
Do you give your goats selenium/vitamin e gel? Do they have alfalfa hay?
A good quality loose mineral free choice?

Diet and supplements play a big role in how well the pregnancy progress. Las Vegas has really really hard water with a lot of iron and calcium in it. Especially on the north end, towards Mount Charleston, or If you’re by Lake Mead, it’s the same problem.
It’s really hard to balance what your goats will need.

For Maggie, I’d get some selenium/ vitamin E gel. Some purina goat minerals and I’d also let her have all the alfalfa hay and pellets she wants.

Which feed store are you using? Which vet? There’s a really good feed store out by the gun range and bird sanctuary off 40 going to Mount Charleston (I can’t remember the name sorry) but it specializes in quality horse supplies. The fellow who owns it knows a lot about what the animals needs are because of the water conditions out there. He helped me with my horses years ago but he’s an old timer and smart. He might be able to help you too.

I hope things go better for Maggie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
We feed 4 goats alfalfa hay with goat feed as treats twice a day . The goat feed is Country Companion. We don’t give them any supplements. After 104 born 3 stillborn kids I bought a package of minerals for goats my husband didn’t allow me to feed them minerals. My vet is Jerry Huff . He takes care of our horses for many years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
We feed 4 goats alfalfa hay with goat feed as treats twice a day . The goat feed is Country Companion. We don't give them any supplements. After 104 born 3 stillborn kids I bought a package of minerals for goats my husband didn't allow me to feed them minerals. My vet is Jerry Huff . He takes care of our horses for many years.
They NEED good loose minerals like purina Wnd Rain and Storm (red bag),Purina Goat, Cargyl Onyx, Or SweetlixMeat maker It's very very important. The little bag you bought aren't the right thing. Without supplements like the selenium, and proper minerals, I'm afraid you're going to keep Losing the babies.
Sorry. You should probably have your vet discuss it with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I'm sorry you lost them. :(

For future reference, when you see any red or amber liquid coming out with contractions, babies should shortly follow. If only liquid goo keeps coming, it's time to reach in and start feeling for kids. Once that water breaks you should have kids on the ground within an hour. Red-tinged discharge never happens until labor has started and kids are imminent. Things should happen very quickly after that.

I hope your next kidding goes like clockwork.
She started pushing from 1pm. After 4 hours when she pushed I could see the kid at the vulva, but I can't tell it is head or leg. It took about 40 minutes for me to find it is one bent knee coming out . So I went in pull out the bent leg . Only one leg hung out for a while. When she contracted I pulled the whole body out. The kid already died. The kid is normal sized girl. She should have survived if I gave her assistance on time. Can you tell me when I should intervene and what is correct intervention? Pull it out quickly or push it back into the canal and get her in correct position then pull her front legs out? I really want to know it for my next goat's birth. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,179 Posts
Once the goat has begun pushing HARD, the kids should delivered in less than 30 minutes.

If your does are kept in a small space, they need more exercise to get the kids in the proper position.

They also need loose minerals as mentioned above as well as an additional selenium supplement either Bo-Se Injection from your vet or selenium/e paste given orally.

I'm so sorry for your losses this season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,494 Posts
If you see a kid at the vulva, it should be out within a few pushes. There should be noticeable progress with each push. If there's no progress when the doe is that far into labor, it means the kid is stuck in the birth canal and you need to help right away. If it's a breech kid, it is especially important to assist quickly because once the kid moves into the birth canal, the umbilical cord gets pinched off in the passageway and the kid can suffocate.

If you find a breech, reach in and unfold both hind legs and pull them out carefully. Once you have both hind legs, quickly pull the kid out and down, then make sure to clear its nostrils quickly. Sometimes breech kids inhale birthing fluid so you may need to clear their lungs with a snot suction bulb or a large syringe. Or if you don't have one, hold them up by the hind legs, supporting the chest with your other hand, and gently swing them with the head pointing down. Breech kids are not too uncommon, especially with triple births. If it's a small baby the doe can often deliver it on her own, but breech kids definitely have a much lower chance of survival so assistance is very important.

All this birthing stuff can be intimidating, but it's also very rewarding. Hopefully your next kidding goes very smoothly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I
If you see a kid at the vulva, it should be out within a few pushes. There should be noticeable progress with each push. If there's no progress when the doe is that far into labor, it means the kid is stuck in the birth canal and you need to help right away. If it's a breech kid, it is especially important to assist quickly because once the kid moves into the birth canal, the umbilical cord gets pinched off in the passageway and the kid can suffocate.

If you find a breech, reach in and unfold both hind legs and pull them out carefully. Once you have both hind legs, quickly pull the kid out and down, then make sure to clear its nostrils quickly. Sometimes breech kids inhale birthing fluid so you may need to clear their lungs with a snot suction bulb or a large syringe. Or if you don't have one, hold them up by the hind legs, supporting the chest with your other hand, and gently swing them with the head pointing down. Breech kids are not too uncommon, especially with triple births. If it's a small baby the doe can often deliver it on her own, but breech kids definitely have a much lower chance of survival so assistance is very important.

All this birthing stuff can be intimidating, but it's also very rewarding. Hopefully your next kidding goes very smoothly.
I am appreciated for your teaching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Update 49. About 30 minutes ago I found 49 pushing hard looking like kidding. We called the vet . He said 49 is expelling the placenta. Then she delivered a kid in the correct position very quickly. I swung it and sucked her mouth and noses. It is normal sized and developed.It is dead. I don’t know when she died. So it is same case as 104. Triplets. first one in breech position, second one deformed, third one is developed. There are many things I have to learn about goats. I admire you guys are informed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
I’m so sorry, it’s got to be frustrating and heartbreaking.
Please think about adding a good mineral and selenium to your care and maintenance routine.
Hay and grain alone is not enough to have a healthy herd.
When I first got goats, I didn’t realize it either. I’ve learned it’s really important and these great folks here have helped me and we’ll help you too.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top