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Discussion Starter · #461 ·
[mention]Chanceosunshine [/mention] It’s sort of a silly story. When my kids were little, they called any carbonated drink a fizzy drink. And more than drinking it, they loved to watch the “fizzies” jump, and pop, and dance around erratically. So the first time I went to the breeders farm to get some pointers and see my goats (well before I was actually picking them up) there were a ton of babies in one pen. They were so funny. The way they jumped, and bounced, spun, and bounded around made me think of my kids laughing at fizzies. And I said, “Oh, they’re fizzy goats.” And the nickname just sort of stuck.
 

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[mention]Chanceosunshine [/mention] It’s sort of a silly story. When my kids were little, they called any carbonated drink a fizzy drink. And more than drinking it, they loved to watch the “fizzies” jump, and pop, and dance around erratically. So the first time I went to the breeders farm to get some pointers and see my goats (well before I was actually picking them up) there were a ton of babies in one pen. They were so funny. The way they jumped, and bounced, spun, and bounded around made me think of my kids laughing at fizzies. And I said, “Oh, they’re fizzy goats.” And the nickname just sort of stuck.
That's a great story!! Thank you for sharing. I have a strange mind and it was making me nuts to not understand. That makes perfect sense!
 

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Discussion Starter · #464 ·
The crew enjoying a break in the rain today.

Funny story about the pic, I took it on my way back from checking the mail. So my hands were full and I kept taking a few steps forward, making sure I could see all the goats and forgot Archer (my LGD) was lying on the ground right in my path. Right after I took the pic, I tripped over him sending my mail and phone flying to the mud so I could catch myself and not smush the dog. So I came back with hands caked in mud, dirty, wet mail, and a picture where you can sort of see all the goats.
Plant Vertebrate Tree Mammal Grass
 

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I would have totally done something like that!! And I would still be laughing about it!
Your story reminded me of when I was working in the garage and I stepped on a hoe. Up came the handle off the floor and smacked me right in the face. All I could think was, “This only happens in cartoons!!”
Those are the kinds of things that I immediately take a look around to see if anyone else saw how stupid I am. (Not that YOU were stupid, but I would have felt stupid.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #468 ·
[mention]NigerianNewbie [/mention] They do like all the undergrowth and saplings. It’s funny, when I first got them, they only liked pasture grass. They weren’t real sure about the wooded areas. They were a little afraid to walk into it. Now I can’t get them to eat the pasture grass.

[mention]MadHouse [/mention]Nope, they didn’t laugh or run to check on me. They did look at me with mild curiosity, but absolutely no concern. Even the dog I almost fell on was mildly curious but unconcerned.

[mention]Chanceosunshine [/mention] I’ve done that exact same thing with a rake. And yes, when I had my moment of grace today, I looked around to make sure no one noticed, though that must be habit because I live in the middle of nowhere.
 

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They do like all the undergrowth and saplings. It’s funny, when I first got them, they only liked pasture grass. They weren’t real sure about the wooded areas. They were a little afraid to walk into it. Now I can’t get them to eat the pasture grass.
The weanlings here started out "pasture raised" and had to adapt to being "brush eaters". There was a learning curve until their little light bulbs went off about browsing being more tasty than grazing.

This year I am/will be sectioning off different areas of grass for them, and so far, they are clueless or maybe not hungry enough, to realize food could be found right under their own hooves. These past 4 (four) years a fallow field of saplings, vines, and blackberry has been transformed to more of an open meadow.

There are other areas I could/will rotate them into just to clear the understory, though it will only last about 10 weeks. And some way, these guys need to learn about grass that can be eaten fresh and moist instead of dehydrated and dry.

I will be out there on my hands and knees, bending over while pretending to eat grass while offering which ever was close enough the fist full I'd tear out for them. Worked beautifully when they were young and would taste the sapling I bent over for them while breaking off a leaf for myself to "munch" on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #472 ·
[mention]NigerianNewbie [/mention] I really wish I had pictures of you teaching your goats to goat. Now that’s dedication. I am thinking I’m going to have to start sectioning off parts of the property and do some rotational grazing too. My biggest hurdle is I can’t get a handle on how big I should make each section. I know who long they stay in there depends on how fast they eat the grass/forage. But fencing isn’t cheap and I feel like I’d just be guessing and that’s a pricey guess if I’m wrong.

[mention]KY Goat Girl [/mention] They do give us hilarious looks when we’re falling all over ourselves.
 

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But fencing isn’t cheap and I feel like I’d just be guessing and that’s a pricey guess if I’m wrong.
You're telling it like it is on the fencing. I've been adding to the hoarding phase of cattle panels for years. In the once overgrown field there has always had permanent heavy duty T post left in place and the panels are moved from one section to the other. In the wooded areas, I just use the light duty T post, tree trunks when available, attached together with the handy dandy farm rope from the hay. I pull the post, move the panels and start a new area about every 1 1/2 to 2 weeks. (8' panels, 16' panels are too cumbersome for me to carry and/or load on the truck) Lots of people use electric netting with great success. There is to much wilderness to be trimmed away for netting here. Well, unless it's put on basically the lawn full of green stuff they don't know about eating yet. o_O
 

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Discussion Starter · #474 ·
[mention]NigerianNewbie [/mention] I love using cattle panels for movable fencing. That’s my goal, to stock pile enough to be able move the panels and rotate that way. My garden, turkey pens, and buck pens took the little stick pile I did have. I might try the 8 footers. Some areas are too uneven for the 16s, but the shorter ones might work. We have to cut them to fit the sharp declines and inclines. But I don’t want to put up anything permanent until I’ve got it sorted out. And I haven’t had the best luck with electric fence so far. I know others swear by it but ours has been a hassle and disappointing. Plus, the weeds and vines try to swallow it within days of weed whacking around it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #479 ·
The goats are a little annoyed that the turkeys are once again free to roam (the ones not raising poults anyway). Well, Champ is fine with them because they were his quarantine buddies. And he was nibbling on my hat while I was wearing it and my rule is if you nibble it, you wear it. And he seemed to like that rule.

The dogs love the toms being out and about again. Archer had to get over trying to stop them from fighting and just let them battle it out (they did and are now friends again). The toms sound the alarm for everything, so I think the dogs feel like they have little security guards helping them out.
 
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