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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So... My needing an actual milk shed is a good ways off, but I have been thinking about options. I have looked at Quonset huts or however you spell that, I have looked at pre built wooden sheds, I have considered modifying the barn I have but I am not loving that idea because it is/was my horse barn and I feel like they need it back, :horse: (Don't worry they have two other barns they can get in for shelter but this is the only one with actual stalls.)
So I have the idea of building one out of concrete blocks... it seems doable, affordable, durable, and very insulated to me, has anyone done this? If so what are the drawbacks, what do you love about it and what do you hate, did you do it yourself or have someone build it?
 

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Shady Acre Homestead
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For now I have wood post corners and some 2 x 4's for roof "trusses"....except, i was broke and couldn't do the roof...LOL....so we cut up an old pool bottom and attached that with nails and sandwiched tho pool bottom edges with 2 x 4's... as a "tarp type roof" ..VOILA! No rain on me when milkin' :cool:

Cost me zero as we had everything laying around...

I'll try to get pics tomorrow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can get the concrete blocks for 75 cents each. I know I would have to have a roof and a floor of some sort, at least I would like a floor, I am not going to be selling milk, so actually I could milk in my driveway if I wanted. LOL Honestly I would like water and electric hooked up to it but that probably won't happen. Dad "sort of" hooked up electric to my horse barn, it is the kinda thing where you can switch some things and get electric out there if you really need it, but I generally don't mess with it. He put real glass paned windows up high in my horse tack/feed room so it is pretty well naturally lit in there.
I don't know I just thought about it and thought, it gets so hot here concrete blocks seem like they'd be cool in the summer, but I guess that kinda depends on the type of roof you throw on it too. It gets SO hot in my horse barn... sheesh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My aunt just had a shed built, the day I mean the actual DAY the guy come out to build it I found her one on craigslist for 200. She had been talking about wanting one for months. so I called her to offer to haul it for her if she wanted it, she sad dang, they guy came out this morning to build me one and is just finishing up.
I should have just went and picked it up for myself but it is really smaller than what I want.
 

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I see a couple of potential problems with a concrete block milking parlor. The first is that concrete transfers - and holds - both heat and cold. I notice you live in Arkansas so the cold would probably not be a problem, but the heat could be. The 2nd problem is that, due to the tendency of holding heat and cold, concrete blocks tend to mold - especially in humid climates. I discovered that while living in an apartment in Georgia that had been converted from old army barracks built of concrete blocks. If Arkansas tends to be on the humid side, that would only compound the problem. I don't know if a layer of Tyvek would solve the problem of holding heat/cold and provide enough "insulation" to prevent mold or not. It might be worth checking into.

PS It's not a gooney idea. With a little research into potential problem areas, it could very well be the ideal solution! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah it can be humid here. Depending on the season and well really just whatever there weather feels like doing. I see a lot of instituitional buildings around here build of concrete blocks I figure because they are affordable to build. They always feel cool in the summer but maybe it is like you said once you get them cool they stay that way, so that may be due to their cooling systems.
It gets hot here in the summers. This summer has been a cooler and wetter one than normal but it is common for us to be above 100 for lots of summer days, and even over 110 for a couple weeks each summer usually. Today is was 99. Our winters are generally mild though. We usually still have grass all winter. It gets below freezing some but nothing like you face.
 

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Oh yuck! :eek: How do you deal with it? It was 97 here today with relative humidity of something like 27% and I thought I was going to melt! I actually snuck into the house and hid from 2-5 because it was so hot - got the dishes done, though! Heat didn't used to bother me that much, but I am way past the days of being able to handle even 100 degree days - let alone 110! I really envy you the grass year round, but if it means putting up with temps like that I think I will pass. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well it isn't like summer and spring grass but it is there. I'll put it this way, my horses had rather graze in the winter than eat the hay we provide. And I put out good quality hay. They had just rather eat grass than hay. I used to love summer, but I got too hot twice in my life, once working for dad and another time trying out a potential horse I wanted to buy and since then I can't take the heat like I used to. So I don't go out in the heat of the day unless I have to, chores are mornings and late evenings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Most of the older dairies used concrete blocks, painted to close up all the pores in the blocks. Its a great idea.
Thanks, what do you think is the best type paint to use. I was thinking of painting too with something that would wipe down easily when needed. I didn't know if regular exterior house paint would work or whether there was something even better out there.
 

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Well I used the overhang on the side of my barn and enclosed it for the goats. It worked out well and I milk in my barn isle which has cement floor. Tack room has little fridge for milk and use horse wash stall for cleaning stuff up.
 
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