My new girl :( Mastitis or no? Bad Udders or NO? **Pictures**

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Crista, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    I had advertised that I needed a Doe in milk for my current puppies.
    I have a litter of 11 beautiful Border Collies on the ground! Yippie! Here is a picture of one of the beautiful boys! He is darling. Took this today!
    46362741_2531447220206600_6803093210336854016_n.jpg
    A good friend said that he had a Doe which had given birth to two kids. Both Kids died :(
    He said the Doe had a lot of milk. I traded him a stock tank for this goat as he had what I needed and I had what he needed!
    I am told she is a Nigerian. But I don't know my breeds too well. What do you think?

    I get her home and her udders (The tips) do have milk. Not much. I was able to get about 2 cups from the tips of both udders combined.

    The udders (Upper) is hard as a rock :( I feared Mastitis!
    goat1.jpg
    This girl had not been handled for milking before and was just pasture kept so it has been a struggle. Twice a day I have spent an hour massaging her udders.
    I am torn. I don't know if this is mastitis? As she does not seem to be in pain and I see no RED spots. I have done this for two days and my milk production is starting to get better. NOT Amazing! But better. For as large as her Udders are you would think I could get more MILK. NOPE!

    So... Mastitis or No? That is my 1st Question.

    Then, I am worried about the overall udder shape/ size!
    goat2.jpg

    None of my goats have udders like this. When I got her they actually touched the ground. This is day and now they are about 3 in. from the ground. But still very low. This is why I was told her kids died. They could not nurse and were trying to nurse high. They did take them into the house to bottle feed but the cold and lack of nutrition after birth did them in. The family did try and save them. They were born overnight and it was in the teens, just so darn cold that night :(

    Has anyone seen Udders quite like this. My other goats are Nubian Cross, Mini Nubian, Mini Nubian Cross, Lamancha and Lamancha Cross... A bunch of MUTTS! None of them with Udders like this LOW HANGING, to the ground :(

    Looking for advice and knowledge please!
     
  2. groovyoldlady

    groovyoldlady Goat Crazy!

    Jul 21, 2011
    Central Maine
    That poor girl! She does look like either Nigerian or Nigerian mix. I have never seen an udder like that. Have you done a mastitis test? What's her temp? What's the texture of her udder like?

    Personally, if I had a goat with an udder like that I would make sure (via test) she does not have mastitis or treat her if she does. Then I would dry her off and never, ever breed her again.

    I'm sure she'll make a lovely pet with consistent love and handling, but she is not ever going to make a good mom or a good milker with that udder.
     
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  3. Goat_Scout

    Goat_Scout Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2017
    Louisiana
    How long ago did she kid? My guess would be that after she kidded and lost her babies, her previous owners didn’t milk her out every day (if at all), which is a must if a newly freshened doe doesn’t have kids on her that are drinking all/most of her milk. Especially heavy producers, they really need to be milked out or they can get mastitis.

    Definitely test her for mastitis if her udder is hard. Milk her at least 2x a day, and I would get some kind of udder balm to massage it with.

    I would milk her as long as you can if possible, the dry her up and just keep/sell her as a pet. That udder is one of the worst I have ever seen. :( Poor girl!

    Your BC puppy is adorable though! Congratulations on the litter!
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
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  4. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    Hi guys, I am so so so very new at this and I don't know how to test for mastitis. Can you give me some pointers on this. I was just told "Doe in milk". I was not prepared for this :( My heart is a little broken for this girl. :(
     
  5. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    She kidded on the 11th I think, the man did say he was milking her to give it to the baby goats but I worry not how she should have been. I have never in my life seen udders like this. I know it was recent, she still has some bloody discharge too.
     
  6. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas

    I am new to this Goat stuff. Mine I have never really had problems with. How do you test for Mastitis? I am so sorry, I will do this but I don't know how.
     
  7. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas

    I will take her temp when I get home from work at 1 a.m.
    What will a normal temp be for a goat?
    I will update my findings.

    How do I test for Mastitis? This was a sight unseen thing. I am upset about it, but glad I have her too. She would have stayed in pasture in so much pain if I had not gotten her. So I am glad to have her.

    Do you think she could ever make a good milk goat? Ever? If I bottle fed her babies and just used her for milking down the road, or is this really a lost cause. :( :( I am so so bummed.
     
  8. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    Yes I have had a few does like this. One was my LaManchas milk goat. She was very prone to mastitis once she got to this point because she would step on her teats when trying to get up or on any rock or limb. It is not something that is totally desired and actually a cull factor. But she is in milk and you need the milk.
    I will let someone else answer on the testing but she either has mastitis or she is very congested which can lead to mastitis. Keep working on her while waiting for a answer on that test and ordering it. Vitamin C is awesome for mastitis and sure wouldn’t hurt if that is not the case. I like to put Vick’s vapor on the udder. It warms up and helps break things up. Try and keep her in a area that she can’t get cut from anything. If you have a pasture with brush it wouldn’t hurt to dry lot her.
    By the way your puppies are stinking cute! Our border collie McNab is getting ready to welp and after seeing that face I can’t wait :hearts:
     
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  9. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    Thank you, I do have some Vitamin-C at home. I can get her that tonight! I don't have Vicks. I do have peppermint oil? I can pick up some Vicks tomorrow A.M.
    I actually moved her into one of the barn stalls. She cannot get cut there, I worried about that a lot. I am so so so glad you responded. Knowing someone else has ran into this eases my mind a lot. I have been worried sick!

    I better get to see some pictures of this Border Collie of yours!!!! I am so so so excited for you, they are such a smart amazing breed of dog!
     
  10. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    The peppermint oil might just work! I’m not familiar with it but as long as it warms up it will be good. A lot of people use warm wash cloths but I find by the time I warm them up and head out they are cool by the time I get there. Maybe a heating pad or something like that would work. I know from experience that being congested can lead to mastitis :( worst experience of my life by the way! There is also something called mastoblast that I used YEARS ago and If I remember right it worked fine. But I honestly think just massaging and warm compression and milking is by far the best thing to do.
    I will for sure share pics of the puppies! These will probably be the last pups we have for awhile because come spring my male has a date with a vet.
    Hopefully someone comes along and tells you about the test. I THINK it is called CMT testing but I’m not 100% sure. And good thinking on the stall! I know my poor gal would constantly end up stepping on her teats and cutting them open. But when I put her in a smaller pen with softer ground/ straw it seemed to help her a lot
     
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  11. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    I have this. It will tell me if bacteria is in there, but not what strain of bacteria.
    https://www.jefferspet.com/products...xL7ni8KEZLOm8L7d6fJi7zYfmeD7ywTBoCg2MQAvD_BwE
    The most important thing is to keep her milked out. Goats only have one udder, with 2 teats At first glance I'd say those teats are blown. You need to be very gentle milking her. Only milk from the tips because there is now mammary tissue down in those teats and squeezing that will hurt and cause harm.

    This was caused by horrible udder genetics, OR mishandling in her past,OR a combination of the 2. Those blown teats will never be right, and if it is genetic, then you don't want her propagating kids. If it is not genetic (and how would you ever know?) then you still have extra time and trouble milking her as opposed to a doe who will give more milk for less trouble. If you sell her as a pet, there is the terrible risk she will still be bred, and more kids will die and that udder will get worse and worse.

    That's what would happen where I live. I don't ever sell a doe with an unworkable udder, because I know people won't listen and they'll breed anyway. My does that are not decent breeding stock I have to butcher, for their own sake. They are then excellent dog food and help with my immense dog food bill. That sounds heartless, I know. But it is better for them than the alternative here. And my dogs have to eat meat in one form or another.

    Keep her milked out. A vet should be able to culture the milk samples and tell you exactly what, if any, bacteria is in the milk. and keep massaging that udder with the peppermint oil but put it in a carrier oil like olive or coconut first. Garlic and vitamin C are both excellent for this and won't cause a problem with feeding the milk to your pups in the same way that going immediately to antibiotics would. Because she may not yet have mastitis.

    Poor thing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2018
  12. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    Thank you so much for your honesty. I wonder if there is a way to have her goat spayed? Then she could live out at the farm. Yes, I do agree. I am so bummed. I will keep her milked out and try and find a Vet in this area who can test this milk. I know no one who deals with goats around here. Not any Vets. I will start searching!
     
  13. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    I forgot to whom I was writing, LOL.
    Yes, it is possible to spay a goat if you find a vet who will do so. It needs to be a vet familiar with goats, because goats don't handle anesthesia very well at all. It kills them quite easily.

    If you plan to have her live out her life there with you, then it is not a problem to just not ever breed her again. I was only speaking about if you moved her on, what would likely happen to her.

    It does not have to be a vet who specializes in goats to test the milk, one that deals with cattle can do so.

    But it is best to have a vet in order to have vet care for your goats, because they will need care from time to time

    Good luck.
     
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  14. groovyoldlady

    groovyoldlady Goat Crazy!

    Jul 21, 2011
    Central Maine
    Normal temp for a goat is about 101.5ºF-103.5ºF.

    I was about to post a link for the CMT when I realized it was the exact same link @mariarose posted! She gave you great advice and info. :bookgoat:

    By the way, your puppy is ADORABLE!
     
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  15. Dayna

    Dayna Well-Known Member

    Aug 16, 2012
    Pahoa Hawaii
    To me it looks like her teats are blown out, and likely a congested udder.

    I've milked goats for other people with blown teats and its hard because the milk pools in them rather than staying up in the udder. I have no idea what the technical term is for that.
     
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  16. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    I’m not sure how your set up is but if you can just keep her away from the buck you don’t need to spay her. I can not stress how right Mariarose is on goats not doing well with anesthesia. I retired the goat I mentioned that is like this girl and I just kept her in my back yard when the bucks were out with the does. She drove me nuts of a day every month but as much as she tried to tell me her life sucked that day it was better then dealing with cuts and mastitis. She was my all time favorite goat and I lost her this year at 13+ years old.
    And because I said I would not trying to highjack your post at all ;) IMG_1542392743.934001.jpg
     
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  17. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Agree with above - DO take a rectal temp - she may also need antibiotics if she has mastitis and/or infection. I hope you can help her, I do think consulting a vet is VERY wise in this case.
     
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  18. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    But don't stop milking her out while looking. At least 2 times per day and more would be better. Her twins would be emptying her regularly throughout the day, had they lived.:(
     
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  19. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    yes, I have noticed that. It is very hard to get milk from her. It's different! This has not been an easy task for sure.
     
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  20. Crista

    Crista New Member

    21
    Dec 27, 2017
    Lindsborg, Kansas
    Yes, I'm still planning on milking her twice a day and boiling the milk for the pups. I just won't give it raw like I normally do because I don't know if she has mastitis. I can tell she has great relief after being milked.
     
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