myotonics

Discussion in 'Meat Market' started by alyssa_romine, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    Myotonics are meat goats and have many different names. They are commonly Fainting goats, stiff leg, wooden leg, and fainters. They are known for their condition of Myotonia which is a stiffening of muscles. They may fall down when they get stiff or they may brace themselves and not fall at all. Their condition doesn't harm them at all and lasts up to about 30 seconds.

    Feel free to email me about them.
     
  2. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) New Member

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    Waco, KY
    I would love to have a farm full of fainters - all colors. But shh......Brad would kill me.
     

  3. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    They are awesome that's for sure. I like to watch them run around and get stiff...it is very funny because my doeling is the most myotonic and she got bumped into and fell over...poor girl couldn't get up.
     
  4. Duchesse

    Duchesse New Member

    78
    Oct 31, 2007
    I'm interested in all miniature goats and the myotonic goat is classified as a mini breed.

    Although the myotonic is considered a meat breed they cannot meet the demands of the commercial meat market. Weights at maturity can vary from 60lbs to 175lb, the latter being the "improved" animals produced by breeders especially in Texas and Tenessee. Myotonic x boer = "The Texmaster." The myotonic is also said to take 3-4 years to mature. They are too small, slow maturing and with the numbers ranging between 3000-5000 in the U.S. they are still considered rare. They seem to be good pets, are entertaining and may be good as a family homestead meat producer but that is the extent of their contribution to the goat market.
     
  5. all1965

    all1965 New Member

    381
    Oct 6, 2007
    AR
    Within the breed to be considered a mini they have to be under 23" for does and 24" for bucks. (I think i would have to look again to make sure)
    most of mine are either mini or small
    I don't like big goats and these are easy to handle, keep fenced in, and great fun.
     
  6. Duchesse

    Duchesse New Member

    78
    Oct 31, 2007
    I don't like big goats either. That is why I'm interested in all mini breeds. Pgymy, Nigerian Dwarf, Myotonics, Pygora (shearing required twice a year) Mini Nubians, Kinders. My motto is "The smaller the better." I think they are especially cute when small. I will be looking for a myotonic and a Nigi for my dwarf goat collection but I'm partial to the pygmy. I like color as well. I've heard that Myotonics can mature at as little as 60lbs.
     
  7. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    I believe you are correct. I have a doe now that probably weighs right at 60 lbs. And she is pretty small. She isn't a mini but she isn't very big.
     
  8. DaveyFarm

    DaveyFarm New Member

    11
    Nov 28, 2007
    Hamburg, PA
    I have a small herd of fainters. I must admit that 10 years before I actually had one I wanted one because they fell over...and were different.

    Since we started with them about 2 years ago I've fallen in love with them. The novelty of fainting would have worn off long ago. While I love them all, the one who has absolutely kept me enjoying the goats is my buck. He's intelligent, kind, and gorgeous. He's not pushy and demanding....like my females.

    I's like to think my goats fall somewhere inbetween "meat" type, and pet type. I've heard that the Fainting goat was used to be crossed with the Boer to make a goat that was easier to handle. Is this true? I know my buck is sweet as can be(we breed off of a lead rope). Are Boer bucks much more agressive? Females harder to get a handle on?
     
  9. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    Myotonic crossed with boer makes a Texmaster...but it is a certain percentage and is a secret.
     
  10. DaveyFarm

    DaveyFarm New Member

    11
    Nov 28, 2007
    Hamburg, PA
    That's what I've read. I'm not interested in the percentages, or the secrets. I'm happy with my "kids".

    I was just wondering, as my only goat experinces have been with my own....

    Are Boers that much more aggressive(generally speaking)?
     
  11. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    No I don't think boers are more aggressive, our boers are very calm. Even our big boer buck, he's the biggest baby on the farm.
     
  12. Shelly

    Shelly New Member

    386
    Oct 5, 2007
    California
    My experience with boers and fainter together was 2 boer wether and 1 fainter wether. The boers will came up to the fence to eat or see what you had. The fainter would alway stay back. The boers where more aggressive but in a friendly way they just wanted attention. The funny thing at fair was when we let them run around in the ring or would walk them for exercise the boers would each get on one side so that if the Forest(the fainter) would faint they would hold him up. Fainter are much quieter then boers. Every boer we had will scream for attention and food just big babies. Shelly
     
  13. DaveyFarm

    DaveyFarm New Member

    11
    Nov 28, 2007
    Hamburg, PA
    Shelly,

    I thought Boers were pretty mild too. There is a Boer farm down the road, and they are seem easy going...but I guess you can never tell, and each goat is different. It makes me wonder why then do they cross the 2? If the Boers mature faster etc.

    My female fainters are obnoxious. They have a 2 acre field with grass, brush, weeds, prickers etc, but if it's after 3PM and they see a human.. it's on! They don't stop screaming until I let them in. Only in the cold weather, with small babies they come in the barn(they have sheds of different types to pick from). They have me trained just to their liking.
     
  14. all1965

    all1965 New Member

    381
    Oct 6, 2007
    AR
    They cross the two because the Fainters Myotonia helps increase muscleing and I think Fainters have a lower bone to meat ratio as well. Not 100% sure on that either.

    I don't have any other breed. I had pygmys for 2-3 months before I got the Fainters. I like my Fainters better. They are easy to keep in, easier to catch, and come in a variety of colors.
     
  15. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    all1965...you are correct on the myotonia helping with the muscling. Crossing a myotonic buck to any breed doe will give you a higher meat to bone ratio...that is the great thing about myotonics bucks for commercial herds that want a lot of meat and less bone.
     
  16. Shelly

    Shelly New Member

    386
    Oct 5, 2007
    California
    Sorry I didn't word that right. My boers have alway been like an really friendly out going kid and the fainter is more of a sweet shy kid. Never bad just different personality. I've only had one fainter and visit the breeder a few times but her place is much quieter then mine with the loud mouth sheep and boers. I'm sure other people of had different inexperience with each breed. Like everyone said the cross is for more meat/muscle. In the market class you want a square wide muscled goat. Don't know if you seen picture of the cross here a website. http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/texmastergoats.html
    Shelly
     
  17. DaveyFarm

    DaveyFarm New Member

    11
    Nov 28, 2007
    Hamburg, PA
    That is a beautiful goat. Thanks for the picture, I've not seen one before.
     
  18. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    there is a big artical in hobby farms about myotonics the mini myotonics the silky tenn. fainting goat and the tex masters in the nov/dec. issue.
    I found it really interesting.
    beth
     
  19. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I see this is a year old ..but.. I wanted to respond.. :greengrin:
    No..I have FB boers and they are gentle... even my bucks.....
    but I do have to say... that in every breed you "may" find one that is mean or wild.... in my experience... I have had only 1 ...aggressive buck and he hit the road really fast...I have never experienced a boer doe with aggression... towards me in the boer world.....they are sweet..I love them... :love: :wink:
     
  20. barnyard

    barnyard New Member

    15
    Feb 10, 2009
    Canton, Texas
    I agree with Toth boer goats, I love my boers, they are very sweet and mild. A good thing, since a buck can be 350 lbs or more. We have raised these for several years and have 2 boer to kid this month and one fainting goat bred to a boer about to kid. I am very interested to see what these kids (hopefully twins) look like. :love: