Need help with corrective hoof trimming

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by rosawoodsii, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. rosawoodsii

    rosawoodsii New Member

    58
    Feb 20, 2013
    Maine
    I have a doe that has funky hooves. Unfortunately, she was the one that suffered from my learning curve. I've been trying for the past year to make her more upright and take off extra toe, but not making much headway. These photos are of her hind hooves, which are by far worse than the front. I'm baffled how to trim her and fix this, and I'd be grateful for any help.

    If I trim off too much at a time, I hit the quick. At first I was concentrating on toes only, as her pasterns are so angled, but now I think I have way too much heel. I was trying to trim her every two weeks, but that didn't seem to be working, so I'm letting her go longer. It's been about 6 weeks and I think that might be too long.

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    Rear view

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    Front view of hind hooves

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    Left hind straight on rear view


    [​IMG]
    Left hind underside

    [​IMG]
    Right hind straight on rear view

    [​IMG]
    Right hind underside

    [​IMG]
    Outside right, inside left

    [​IMG]
    Side view right hind hoof

    [​IMG]
    Outside left, inside right
     
  2. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    She has way too much toe and needs flattened out. Her hairline should be parallel to the ground. Your not going to fix her pasterns with trimming. She needs a Selinum shot to fix that.
     

  3. Tenacross

    Tenacross Well-Known Member

    May 26, 2011
    Enumclaw, Wa.
    There is some toe to take off there, but I think the problem is way too much heel. Pictures 3 and 5 (going down) both show the problem. Just about everything that doesn't have hair touching it should be taken off. That's a slight exaggeration, but not by much. If you were to only take off toe on that goat right now, I bet when you are done her toes, even though you just trimmed them, would point into the air and not touch the stand. Everybody thinks in order to get a hoof to look like that diagram of a proper goat hoof that you see. The one where the hoof is pretty much straight up and down, as opposed to a horse etc., think you have to take only toe or you will look like the horse diagram. I used to think that too, but when I was done, the toe would not touch the stand. The heel needs to be taken down clear to the sole. From there, anything that is not "flat", especially the toe, need to be trimmed down. I get pretty aggressive with the toe area with my show goats, but if I don't take that heel down flat, the goat will still rock back and look like they aren't right. And they aren't. I think where people go wrong is they fail to take into consideration the natural angle of the pastern. That straight (almost) up and down natural hoof you see in the diagram parallels the pastern if done right. You have to take heel to do that. What really got me on the right track was using the grinder. If you approach trimming as making things "flat and level" and not letting the diagram mess with your mind, you will improve your trimming. At least at my farm. ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  4. mjs500doo

    mjs500doo Member

    Nov 24, 2012
    Boyd, Wisconsin
    I agree too much toe. Any idea on her bloodline? Are they weak through the Pastern? Try Bo-Se first. Is she Saanen? I have found Saanen to be precarious for this issue.


    Sent from my iPhone using Goat Forum
     
  5. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Tell you what, I've got a Saanen that I'm going to help out with over the next couple weeks. I'll take pics of how I fix him. Saanens are a world of their own with naturally bad hoofs. His look much like your girls right now.
     
  6. Darlaj

    Darlaj New Member

    963
    Dec 10, 2013
    Goathiker - I am looking forward to this!
     
  7. rosawoodsii

    rosawoodsii New Member

    58
    Feb 20, 2013
    Maine
    She is a Saanen (pretty obvious from the color :) ). Tenacross, you are absolutely right, when I trimmed only her toes, she didn't have a flat hoof and looked like she was on rockers. A couple of months ago, I started trimming a lot more heel. because the hooves actually look rolled. I believe her pastern angle is related to the poor trims she's had. When I came to goats, I was trimming like I did my horses--big mistake. I need to trim her very soon, but I'm concerned with the rolled hoof. Her hooves look to me like there's too much on the outside and too little on the inside--but I'm not sure if that's an optical illusion.

    Goathiker, I wish you lived close by! I'll be looking for your photos. I need all the help I can get with this. If I may ask, please take before and after photos, showing each step if you can. I realize this is a lot to ask, but there's absolutely no one around here who knows how to trim goat hooves--including my horse farrier, who raises sheep.

    Saanens definitely have hoof issues, but you know, we've bred it into them. The early imports didn't have the foot problems they have now. Possibly too much inbreeding, and too much culling of Sable Saanen lines, narrowing the genetic pool.
     
  8. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    I'll do my best. I'll be on my own, so, it will be snip this and take a pic, snip that and take a pic. It will be Monday or Tuesday.
     
  9. mjs500doo

    mjs500doo Member

    Nov 24, 2012
    Boyd, Wisconsin
    We've actually bred feet and legs out of them. Kind of like the Holstein breed. We worry so much about the craze of milk production sometimes other things slip. Now that the community is wiser and breeding more holistically, we see a stronger animal, tightly put together, with longevity to boot.


    Animals make such personable friends, they pass no criticisms, offer their ears through happiness and sorrows, and yet possess such undying devotion, even whilst they know all our secrets.
     
  10. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    That's very true Megan, I have a 13 year old Saanen and a 2 year old Saanen. The difference in the feet and hind leg assembly is amazing. The 2 year old is so much stronger and better put together.
     
  11. Casa_la_Palma

    Casa_la_Palma Member

    251
    Oct 15, 2013
    I'm going to follow this thread. Thanks! Goathiker I too am looking forward to your pictures.... A grinder was mentioned. I use a grinder on my horses hoofs. What kind of grinder/disk is used on a goat?
     
  12. Tenacross

    Tenacross Well-Known Member

    May 26, 2011
    Enumclaw, Wa.
  13. Casa_la_Palma

    Casa_la_Palma Member

    251
    Oct 15, 2013
    Thank You Tenacross! My horse trimming supplies will work then :)
     
  14. NyGoatMom

    NyGoatMom Shady Acre Homestead Supporting Member

    Looking forward to seeing progressive pics...I agree...try to get the whole bottom flat. I use a rasp when I am done clipping...
     
  15. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    Ok Jill(Goathiker) hurt her wrist and hasn't been able to get pictures so I told her I would get pictures for her :)

    So first here is an untrimmed hoof :)
     

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  16. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    First I trim the outside wall of the hoof
     

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  17. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    Then the inside wall
     

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  18. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    Then the heel :)
     

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  19. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    And the toe. So one side is completely done here.
     

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  20. J.O.Y. Farm

    J.O.Y. Farm ~Crazy Goat Lady~

    Jan 10, 2012
    New Hampshire
    And rinse lather and repeat :)
    Outside wall again.
     

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