Need lots of advice on this one.......

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by andiplus5, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. andiplus5

    andiplus5 New Member

    45
    Mar 8, 2008
    central Iowa
    Ok, I have an evil goat. She has 1 month old twins. She is turning her twins evil. I do not have any desire to milk this evil thing. She has been traded to someone who won't be here until April 5th or later to pick her up. The lady knows all about her. I don't hold anything back when selling or trading. They can make up their own mind with all the facts. Now, I need to get her away from the rest of the herd. Her doeling is still with me, but is sold. The buckling is ours, we're keeping him. So, what do I do to keep her still in milk? I am going to put her in a stall by herself. The doeling needs to be calmed down because she is as wild as momma. So she will be bottle fed. Do I keep the buckling with the evil mom until she leaves here so she will stay in milk? How hard will it be to calm him down once she's gone? Any advice on her would be helpful. I need to get her out of there today.
    I have another momma goat that is going to have to be sold. She is getting as bad as the first one and hates all my new goats. She also has twins. How do I dry her off the babies without milking her? Do I just take them away from her or do I only put them with her for an hour or two a day? Any advice on her would be great too.
    I just need to know what to do with these two and their babies. Thanks so much!
    Andi :help:
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    does the new owner want to milk her? is that why she needs to stay in milk?

    THen yes you are going to need to keep a kid on the doe or milk her.


    As to the other doe - a little confused on the details. What breed of goat is she?
     

  3. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Well first of all, what do you mean that she is mean? IS she mean to you or just the other goats? I have several does that are the QUEENS of the herd. They let all the other goats know they are the boss. No matter what you will have a goat that is the queen and they will boss everyone else around. Also, the babies WILL more then likely take on the trates of the mom, so you have to watch your buck.
    I just let them deal with the troubles when they are in the pastures, but if I have them locked in the barn then I do lock up the meanest ones, because I do not want any babies or anyone getting hurt. My herd queen butted one of my does before she delivered (about 3 weeks) and I believe that is why she had a still born baby.
     
  4. andiplus5

    andiplus5 New Member

    45
    Mar 8, 2008
    central Iowa
    ok, I think I have it figured out now. I know that I am not able to fully describe the trouble on just a post or two, but we are talking about more than just herd queen issues. I have already tamed down 3 other goats that came from the same place as this goat. She won't be tamed and she won't be nice and now she has to go. But I have made room for her in a stall by herself with just her buckling. I know this will not calm her because I have tried it but it will certainly calm the rest of my herd. There is something wrong with this goat and I have tried everything known to man, but I will not have a herd of wild, mean goats. There is no point in it. I almost dread going out there now because of her. But with her gone, the other goats will go back to normal and I can enjoy them again. Thanks anyway.
    Andi
     
  5. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Andi. How soon will she be gone? (for your sake). Good Luck.
     
  6. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    The reason I asked for more details is you were asking for help and a lot of the decisions on what to do with a doe in milk that you need to dry off stem from what breed of goat she is. I just don't have the time in the day to type out how to dry off a goat 4 different ways depending on the breed, narrowing it down to what breed just helps me and you out with the solution.

    sometimes a goat just doesn't like you, and when the fealings are mutual - yup it is best to move on.
     
  7. andiplus5

    andiplus5 New Member

    45
    Mar 8, 2008
    central Iowa
    Stacey,
    To be perfectly honest I don't know what she is. She came out of a pygmy so it's safe to assume she's half pygmy. But she is red kinda speckled. Who knows what daddy was. He was milk goat I know that. she came out of either the nubian, alpine, or saanen buck that the previous owners had. And even then, they were all crosses. Who knows. BTW-- I didn't know there were different ways to dry off different breeds. Interesting!
    Andi
     
  8. andiplus5

    andiplus5 New Member

    45
    Mar 8, 2008
    central Iowa
    Lori,
    She will be gone after april 5th. Hopefully!
    Andi
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I have a little more time and my computer is being nice for a change! :D

    part pygmy - thats in her favor to be dried off faster.

    With pygmies I just leave them to dry off on their own - checking once every other day to make sure they aren't to full that it leads to mastitis.

    Dairy - you need to slowly stop the milking. Large standared dairy goats produce a large amount of milk and are in danger of getting mastitis if you try to dry them off "cold turkey" so you need to go from say twice a day milking to once a day milking and never stripping her out but leaving some milk in her udder so her body gets the idea that she doesn't need to produce as much. And then gradually work your way to milking every other day till you cna just check every other day or so and only relieve pressure as needed. Depending on the amount of milk that the doe produces determins the length of time this will take as well as her point in laction. at peak lactation it will take longer then say 9-10 months after kidding.

    boers you can dry them off more like a pygmy as they don't usually produce as much milk. But that is to be determined individually as some boer does are high yeild milkers and you don't want to loose her milking ability to mastitis either.

    I hope that clarrifies it more. And I appoligize for being a bit rude in my post above. I was frustrated with something else and let it come through with my post to you. :oops:
     
  10. rgbdab

    rgbdab New Member

    252
    Nov 26, 2007
    TEXAS
    I think that leaving the buckling with her in a seperate area is a great idea. He will soon find out he's not so tough when she isn't there. Best of luck! D