Need to breed "mutt" dairy does

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by cercyonis, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. cercyonis

    cercyonis New Member

    14
    Dec 8, 2010
    Texas
    Hello all,

    I'm new to this forum and new to goats as well. I'm enjoying my two Nubian-mix does very much. One is only nine months old (she's also half Alpine), and the other is nearly two (she's half "Cashmere") and supposed to be pregnant. (I'm really thinking she's not, which bugs me because I paid a little extra for the unborn.) But anyway, I need advice about how to manage them in the future, because I bought them to provide my toddler son and me with milk. Obviously, for milk, we need kids first. I need help deciding what breed of buck to use on my does in order to make kids that will sell. Here in central Texas, a lot of Boers and Nigerian Dwarf goats seem to be available. I haven't found any dairy bucks nearby other than Nigerian Dwarfs. I'm wondering if I should go with the meat angle, and breed my does to a Boer... or go with the "small" dairy angle, breeding them to a ND... OR, go with the full-size dairy angle, and try to find a Nubian!? All I know is that I can't have a bunch of mouths to feed long-term, and need to sell the kids ASAP after they are weaned. I already have seven horses, and no one seems to want to buy a horse in this economy. If you've read all this, thank you very much, and I hope to glean from some of the great knowledge I've seen on this board! :)

    ~Jennifer
     
  2. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Welcome!!

    If the smaller dairy goats sell better, you could cross with the ND buck...theres also the plus to being able to sell as pets due to the smaller size. If you go the meat route, I have heard that crossing a full meat breed like the Boer with a dairy breed makes for better flavored meat...that could be a selling point too. Trying to keep the kids all fullsize dairy, going with a nubian buck, you would also need to try and keep udders on any daughters decent with good structure so that they are able to be milked...some goats regardless of genetics or breed have udders that are too low, teats too small or just not good candidates for the family milker. It's all trial and error, you could try out different bucks to see how the kids turn out from year to year or since you have 2 does now, breed one to a Boer and one to a ND.
     

  3. cercyonis

    cercyonis New Member

    14
    Dec 8, 2010
    Texas
    Thanks for the advice. I guess the next fun thing will be trying to find a buck that is CL/CAE negative. I just had my girls tested, and they are clean, yay!