New goat...maybe a fainter?

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by Kelsiekoos, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Kelsiekoos

    Kelsiekoos Guest

    9
    May 24, 2009
    Hello, I'm new to goats and we just got our first the other day. Well, they all seem healthy enough besides worms, we wormed them though, except our doe who is 3 or 4 years old. When we try to get ahold of her she seems to collapse on us. It appears to only be her back legs and her back legs will also give out on her if something spooks her. She was supposed to be a boer cross but now I'm wondering if this is similar to what fainting goats do. Maybe since she is mostly boer she only half faints?!? :shrug: :wink: Anyway any advice would be appreciated, ecspecially if you think it is a disease causing this!! BTW when I got her I checked her eyes, ears, nose, mouth, legs...everything looked good far as I could tell...no sores/ swelling.
     

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  2. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Hmm...that is odd, I don't think theres fainter there, by the looks of her she is a normal sized Boer cross...I'd say there may be something neurelogical up thats causing the rear end paralysis with sudden movement.

    BTW WELCOME! I moved your topic here so that you would get more hits :)
     

  3. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Welcome to the goat spot. :wave:

    Do you or can you get any history on her? Now in that picture, is she getting up from a fall or when she went down?

    The reason I ask is when they "faint, and they really do not do that," they go down all at once. SO they fall to their side. If she is just going down on her back end, I would have to agree with Liz about being a neurological problem.
     
  4. Kelsiekoos

    Kelsiekoos Guest

    9
    May 24, 2009
    Thanks. That's what I was afraid of. I'm wondering though...my husband picked them up so I didn't see what happened but I guess the guy who owned them pulled her into our trailer by her legs. I don't know if this is normal pratice for a goat that doesn't lead or if maybe he hurt her. If it is neurological does anyone know how I go about getting that diagnosed? I was really hoping to breed her but don't want to if it is something genetic.
     
  5. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I personally would not bred her until I new she was fine, and NO you should never pull a goat by the legs.
     
  6. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    it probably is her reaction to being touched because of being rough handled so much before. Goats are smart -- they will do all sorts of things to keep from being led.

    I wouldnt drag her or pull her by her legs. Try encouraging her to walk with something that she enjoys like crackers or any kind of treat.
     
  7. Kelsiekoos

    Kelsiekoos Guest

    9
    May 24, 2009
    Thanks. I don't have any history on her and doubt I could get much on her. When she goes down sometimes it is only her back legs then she stumbles all over trying to right herself. Other times she goes down on her back legs then sort of just flops to her side. In the picture she had actually just squated down but that's how she looks when she goes down. We spent quite a bit of time at the guy's house we bought her from and she never did this there. We don't handle her the way he did. My husband has picked her up to put her in the bed of the truck and other than that we lead her just like you said with a bucket of corn. She will colapse then too like if she lays on her side she knows we can't move her although it really doesn't seem voluntary. Thank you all so much for your help! I'm really hoping nothing serious is wrong with her! She is the best looking out of the few that we bought and by far the friendliest!
     
  8. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    The myotonic gene is a mutant gene actually. All breeds can get it though its a fault in all but the fainting goats.

    But for it to be a myotonic gene thats causing the collapse she would have to be startled in some way which doesnt sound like is the case.

    I remember a member dealing with this before in a real nice buck and they were going to put it down -- only to find out he was just low in selenium and once given a couple shots of BoSe he healed up fine.

    I suggest (for all your goats) you get a good mineral with selenium in it. Needs to be a loose mineral formulated for goats only. Try Purina, Sweet Lix, Southern States, Golden Blend to name a few that I know about that are good.

    If you can get some selenium vit E gel that would also help. Much less chance of ODing her on it if you give the gel instead of the BoSe (which is Rx ).
     
  9. Kelsiekoos

    Kelsiekoos Guest

    9
    May 24, 2009
    Thanks I'll have to get some of those shots tomorrow and see how she does after that. We haven't gotten the minerals yet either although they have only been here a couple day so I'll get those tomorrow too. She does appear to collapse most of the time when she is spooked or when we try to grab her though.
    Thanks again for your help!
     
  10. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    you wont be able to get the BoSe like I said thats an Rx but the minerals I suggest.

    If she does collapse when startled she may have a form of the myotonic gene
     
  11. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    i agree that it sounds like some sort os neurologicsl or mineral problem. It may have been caused by the man pulling the doe by her back legs. Like Stacey said you are going to have to get Bo-Se from a vet. and most vets want to see the doe in question before they administer it. I would also get her on some good loose mineral.
    beth