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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was to my previous knowledge that ivermectin injectable was 1cc per 40lbs, or given orally, 1cc per 33lbs.

I have heard a few people now say it is 1cc per 30lbs oral.

Very confused now!
 

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In my area, 1mL per 30lbs orally is used with no ill effects. Most folks are estimating the weights anyhow so that difference in dosage likely is absorbed in poor weight estimating and poor math! haha

Ivermectin has a HUGE margin of safety so rounding up is always a good idea in weight estimate and dosing.
 

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I agree..actual dose is 1cc per 33 pounds but rounding seems appropriate at that difference especially since many estimate weight. This difference should not cause harm. I will still suggest the 1 per 33# but like salty mentioned. Ivimec has a very wide margin of safety.
One rule of thumb i tell people when estimating weight is to add 10 pounds on a grown standard goat. Add 5 pounds on adult nigerian. (Unless they are using meds that are weight sensitive, then weigh your goat) as stated, better to over give than undergive dewormers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Orally 1 cc per 33 lbs, but 1 cc per 30 lbs is OK too.
Do not give anemic goats Ivomec orally.

Injected Ivomec is 1 cc per 40 lbs for mites and for anemic goats.
Doesn't that warning go for all oral wormers when anemic?

Not just ivermectin?
 

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All injectable or pour-ons should not be given orally in anemic goats. If its made for oral..its ok..like valbazen.

I would not give pour ons orally ever!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All injectable or pour-ons should not be given orally in anemic goats. If its made for oral..its ok..like valbazen.

I would not give pour ons orally ever!
So there is not a worry about a bleed out if giving an oral wormer like ivomec sheep drench, valbazen, prohibit, cydectin drench, quest, and all the above to a severely anemic goat?

Only if it's an injectable?

Why is that?
 

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Correct. Its the mode of action in which it is designed to work.
Injectable dewormers like ivomec are designed to be injected and stay in the system longer, killing worms slowly. Given orally in goes in kills a bunch and leaves the system. If the goat is heavy loaded, this faster kill could be more than the goat can handle and cause dead worm toxicity or bleed out.
Pour ons are found to also give a quick kill. The added danger in these would be the chemicals they use to help it stick to the thick cow hyde among other things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Correct. Its the mode of action in which it is designed to work.
Injectable dewormers like ivomec are designed to be injected and stay in the system longer, killing worms slowly. Given orally in goes in kills a bunch and leaves the system. If the goat is heavy loaded, this faster kill could be more than the goat can handle and cause dead worm toxicity or bleed out.
Pour ons are found to also give a quick kill. The added danger in these would be the chemicals they use to help it stick to the thick cow hyde among other things.[/QUOTE
But oral wormers that are supposed to be oral do not kill as fast - correct?
 

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Correct. it's a slower kill from what I understand.
 

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Yah, can be confusing. I think because it's made to be oral, there are ingredients that slow things down. There are some oral dewormers that are stronger, like Quest. It has the strongest moxidectin in it of 20 mg/kg
This is one dewormer I would not give off the bat if there is heavy load. As a booster I would.
 
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