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My husband recently inherited his parents small farm in rural Mason County Kentucky. Part of his inheritance was several extremely skittish horses. The only horses my husband knows anything about are between his legs when he rides his Harley as his parents bought the farm for their retirement long after my husband had moved out on his own. We are pretty much flying by the seat of our parents as my husband is tends to trust no one and prefers to handle things his way or no way.
I showed him an article I had found about goats being used in the stables at the derby to calm horses down.The big bad biker came out and told me he would be laughed out of the state by his "brothers" if he owned goats I asked him if his "brothers" were planning on staying in the stables to calm the horses, and he told me I could " look " into it, but he wasn't owning any goats and he would tell everyone he bought them for me to make me happy. A win is a win in my book, no matter how I got there. Is it true? Can a goat calm down a horse? And what kind of goat am I looking for? Does the goat stay with the horse 24/7 or have its own pen? Will I need a goat for each horse? And exactly what do I need to raise goats. I think they are adorable, and I've read up on homesteading, but I don't want to commit to this unless I know it is doable and that I can care for the goats appropriately. I'm a sucker for a cute face, and am afraid they will be way to easy for me to fall in love with. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated as well as reputable breeders I can contact. Sleeping in the stables with the horses each night doesn't actually allow me much time to sleep, which is my reason for the late post.
 

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Welcome to TGS! I can't answer your question because I don't own horses but there are lots of people on here who own both.
Thank you for your response. I have been looking through all the pictures and I am in love! I just may have to become a goat farmer whether they can help the horses or not! I never realized how expressive and cute goats can be!!
 

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Goats are sometimes used to be a companion for a horse that needs company. Sometimes they do help the anxious horses to calm down and quit doing thing such as weaving, pacing or calling out. I have to say horses are very good at reading people’s emotions. Are they being cared for the same way as his parents cared for them? Has their been a change of staff at the barn? Turn out routines? Feed scheduled?

I know this is a goat forum but...

Message me if you want to talk horse, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Goats are sometimes used to be a companion for a horse that needs company. Sometimes they do help the anxious horses to calm down and quit doing thing such as weaving, pacing or calling out. I have to say horses are very good at reading people's emotions. Are they being cared for the same way as his parents cared for them? Has their been a change of staff at the barn? Turn out routines? Feed scheduled?

I know this is a goat forum but...

Message me if you want to talk horse, lol.
The only change of staff at the barn is us, well mostly me. His parents were in a car wreck, survived the crash but only lived about 4 months after the crash. While my husband was at the hospital, nursing homes and hospice with them, I took over the care of the horses. Same turn out and feed schedule they have always had. I can ride each of the horses, it's night and stable time that makes them jittery. Its almost like they hope all day their Mom and Dad will be coming home and each evening they realize they aren't and are stuck with us. The bike really riles up 2 of them, I think they may have heard a Harley motor 4 or 5 times in their lives and that would have been us coming to visit in the summer. I figured out how to fix that problem real quick and ordered a large Amish shed to store the bikes in until I can get a garage built next to the house.Whoever's stall I end up in, when I pass out from exhaustion is fine when I get nudged by muzzle in the morning, but there is one of me and 7 of them. My hubby is sleeping in the house as he is finishing up a work project before taking a leave of absence.
 

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I am new to this forum and don’t really know all the rules. I will try and send you a private message and share some horse advice. Just ignore it if it’s not allowed, or if you don’t want to have a private conversation. Hope things settle at your attorney for you soon.
 

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Welcome to the forum!
I can't help your situation, sorry.
 
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Thank you for being so attentive to them. They may take a bit to warm up to you and your husband and feel secure. Don’t know what your setup is. Maybe get a couple of goats that walk the isle of the barn at night?
Lyons is a great place to start. There is a website called GiddyUpFlix.com. You can rent training videos. Check it out!
Are you feeding the same hay? Are they on turnout during the day?
 

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Fair-Haven
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Sometimes having goats with horses works well, and sometimes it doesn't. Some horse love their goats. Some horses HATE goats and will chase them down, fling them and other things I have seen. I recommend trying to build a relationship with the horses if you plan to keep them. Many animals can be quite suspicious of people they are new to, they need to learn to trust you.
 

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I'm watching you
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Something it took me some time to learn over the years. Start with John Lyons, read him first. He will absolutely change the way you communicate with the horses. Move away ONLY if you out grow him. Training techniques don't mix well done in tandem.
I raised a beautiful palamino saddlebred with John Lyons books. From yearling to three year old. When I got on her that first time, I literally went for a trail ride.
 

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I'm watching you
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Now these horses are waiting for something you're not giving them.
In a normal stable the stalls are cleaned daily, the horses brought in, groomed individually with much talking, hooves cleaned, and then grain ration.
Now, grain, how much are they getting and what is it?
How much real exercise is each animal getting daily?
 

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Along with John Lyons, there is a truly excellent book called
Horse Follow Closely
by Ga-Wa-Ni Pony Boy.
It talks about how much you can learn simply by watching your horses and what that tells you. Things grew into into quite a bit of hype after that book, but I can recommend Horse Follow Closely. I love anything by Pat Parrelli, too.
Some horses hate goats, so I'd go slow there.
Welcome to TGS, and incidentally, Welcome to Kentucky.
 

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My husband recently inherited his parents small farm in rural Mason County Kentucky. Part of his inheritance was several extremely skittish horses. The only horses my husband knows anything about are between his legs when he rides his Harley as his parents bought the farm for their retirement long after my husband had moved out on his own. We are pretty much flying by the seat of our parents as my husband is tends to trust no one and prefers to handle things his way or no way.
I showed him an article I had found about goats being used in the stables at the derby to calm horses down.The big bad biker came out and told me he would be laughed out of the state by his "brothers" if he owned goats I asked him if his "brothers" were planning on staying in the stables to calm the horses, and he told me I could " look " into it, but he wasn't owning any goats and he would tell everyone he bought them for me to make me happy. A win is a win in my book, no matter how I got there. Is it true? Can a goat calm down a horse? And what kind of goat am I looking for? Does the goat stay with the horse 24/7 or have its own pen? Will I need a goat for each horse? And exactly what do I need to raise goats. I think they are adorable, and I've read up on homesteading, but I don't want to commit to this unless I know it is doable and that I can care for the goats appropriately. I'm a sucker for a cute face, and am afraid they will be way to easy for me to fall in love with. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated as well as reputable breeders I can contact. Sleeping in the stables with the horses each night doesn't actually allow me much time to sleep, which is my reason for the late post.
 

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Jill, 'several horses'? A hoofed companion usually only works if you have one [1] horse as they are herd animals and people use a goat because it's cheaper than another horse. With any group of animals of the same kind, there will be one dominate to the others. This especially true of horses. In your case, you probably have a dominant mare. In the case of skittishness, it is probably because in your evening routine it's different, she has not been allowed to go first into the barn/stall. Which makes her and the others skittish. An easy way to tell who is the boss is to watch and see who hits the water first after the morning feeding/let out. She may be also what they call "Buddy Sour" When riding her she will become anxious and not want to leave her herd. Not necessarily to buck but being hard headed. You can overcome this behaviour by taking her mind off the herd by riding her around in circles before going through the gate. Then afterward when being unsaddled become anxious again and wanting to get back to her herd. The other horses will not generally exhibit this behavior. Just my opinion and others mileage may
vary.
 
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