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I just got a 1 week old buckling, he's everything I've been wishing for since I got my first two goats 2 years ago. His grand sire was around 300 pounds and his sire is around 200 pounds. What feeds should I feed him to help him reach his maximum genetic potential in size?

Calf Manna is my first idea at 25% protein, but how much should I feed him a day? I'm getting ready to start introducing hay and feeds for him to nibble and explore.

Thanks for the ideas!
 

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Hi Jayme,
There are a ton of good threads regarding nutrition for bucks and wethers of all ages in the "feeding older goats" section. To find the list of topics, Go to the "Board Indes" and scroll down until you see that catagory.

I encourage your to read up on the importance of maintaining the proper protien levels and Calcium to Phosphorous levels if you want to see your buck reach his potential. Calf Manna is designed for bovines (obviously). Goats have different needs than calves and male goats require even more vigilance when it comes to proper diet due to problems such as Urinary Calculi.

Check out the other topics and you will have lots of questions answered for you. GOOD LUCK!
 

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as long as you don't starve your goats they will reach there genetic potential. the question is how fast do you want them to get there? and what are the risks to your goats? with horses there is some indications that by pushing them to grow there legs have deformities that show up later.
Just remember that you need to feed good foods.
goats can only eat about 5 lbs of food a day. goats also love celery but to meet the nutrition levels your goats need they would need to eat 35 lbs of celery a day. they just can not eat enough celery to grow properly
a growing goat needs more protein than a goat on a mantance diet.
so a growing goat should have alfalfa hay with protein levels of 16 to 20%
once they are finished growing a maintenance feed of hay with 12% protein is plenty
don't wast your money on pellets they are not that good for your goat.
let your goat reach his genetic potential slowly and safely.
 

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Hi fivemoremiles.

Would you mind explaining your previous statement:

don't wast your money on pellets they are not that good for your goat.
We initially fed our young goats alfalfa hay from bales, but after seeing how much they wasted we switched over to pellets. Now there is virtually no waste.

Our goats seem healthy and are growing well. We haven't noticed any adverse affects as a result of switching over to pellets vs. bales, so I'm wondering why you say pellets are not good for goats.
 

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I feed my ewes and does during there last 30 days of gestation and the first 30 days of milking. one lbs a day 0f 20% protein hay pellets. .
I buy my Pellets in one tone totes for $385.00 a ton. the cheapest i can get from the mill is $345 a ton.
I buy dairy quality hay for $155.00 a ton

There has to be a lot of wast to justify that price difference.

High protein supplements like Calf manna are expensive and the rapid growth they produce some times do not allow the bones to form correctly.
It is kind of like a fast growing tree is weeker than a maple or oak that grows slower.
rapid growth is not always better and is always more expensive.
 

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I agree.

Fast growth is aimed for the meat goat industry where goat kids have to reach the desired weight in short time. The goal isn't to get a goat that will stay healthy for 12-14 years.

Pellets are a "nice" way to hide waste in. How could you tell what really was used when making them?
 
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