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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
NOT set up. She's the best conformation doe out of this lady's herd. Reason I'm interested is because of milk production and udders. They're incredible. Excellent texture, carried high and wide, good teats.

Going to go pick her up soon.

Pros:
Tall
Dairy
Lean
Nice brisket
Great set of feet and legs
Upstanding
Long rump
Excellent barrel

Cons:
Weak through her chine
Rump angle a little steep
2 1/2 and never kidded in

What's your opinion??
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She looks like a nice girl and you have plenty of experience to know all the tricks to get her bred.
Thank you. I'm not worried about her settling, I'm actually pleased on how HUGE she is because she's never been bred. Only thing is, I would've liked to see an udder on this girl. I have high hopes! The price is right!
 

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Care giver of 4 milkers, one doeling, and One beau
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my opinion is that you should explain you pros to me. I'm trying to learn about what to look for in a doe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ill do a little searching and see if I can find my previous post on what to look for...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Found it. Here ya go!

#4
mjs500doo
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(Start quote)
Originally Posted by rdmtnranch
Yes I agree. It's not so much the parts as the terms they use to describe them. Like for example flat bone. Does that mean they should not stick out and appear smooth? (End quote)


(Me explaining/replying)
Yup, you want a dairy goat to appear feminine but have nice bone. You want large wide flat ribs without coarseness (in this case meaning round, bony appearance). It also helps to think practicality.

For example:

A high milker needs to consume more feed. Knowing this, I would say I would choose a doeling that is deep, wide, and has a large barrel to support her milking needs vs a shallow, narrow, and close chest. The more width and depth on an animal, there's a better chance of a longer, more productive life as there is more room for ample heart, lung expansion, as well as a large rumen capacity and plenty of space of "housing" for the kids to boot. You want tall, lean, angular looking dairy goats. Straight through the top line, nearly level from hooks to pins, a beautiful blending through the chine and into the shoulder and neck. No roughness or courseness. A dairy goat has a regalness, elegance to her. Refined head with no extra flesh on the throat. Clean legs, free from coarseness (bumps, lumps, neat appearance). Smooth, incurving thighs, wide stance from behind with correct Pasterns. This suggests more room for the udder to be properly carried, as well as correct Pasterns says she'll live a longer life with less feet and leg problems (arthritis, excess hoof growth, etc). When looking at a milking doe from behind you want a high, wide attachment. Not a pointy one. Width suggests strength as there is more there to support the udder. Height suggests higher milking capacity, carried healthier than a weak attached doe, which will break away later in life. You want a strong medial attachment, well defined, which suggests proper udder carriage through life. Snugly attached. Strength again. Teats you want centered under each half, hanging plumb, correct to longer length. Small stubs aren't much good as they prevent kids from sucking properly and commercially, hand milking is a chore, milkers do not fit properly, leading to udder damage and teat orifice damage as well. Same issues with milking, suckling with teats too far apart or too close. Improper milking. You want nice texture to udder, free from fleshiness suggesting adequate blood supply. More blood=more milk. The front attachments you want welded on. Smooth, long fore udder attachments. Suggest more capacity, longer udder life. Free from pockets. You want a nice wide, deep chest, with ample room between the legs, more room for the heart and lungs. Longer health.

When I help with youth, I hold a dairy animal in front of them, and teach them practicality. It seems to click better when you give reasons why, and show what you would like to see in an animal vs not.
__________________
"Animals are such agreeable friends-they ask no questions; they pass no critisms."
-George Eliot
 

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Care giver of 4 milkers, one doeling, and One beau
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Thank you so much! Some of that didn't make since but Most of it was very helpful as I'm trying to learn!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you so much! Some of that didn't make since but Most of it was very helpful as I'm trying to learn!
Where in a sentence or what terms did not make sense? I'll further advise...
 
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