New to this

Discussion in 'Horses' started by Goatzrule, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    Hello all. I just recently bought my first horse. I have ridden for years but have never owned a horse of my own. To top it off I bought myself a Tennessee Walker, I have never ridden a gaited horse before. I know I sound so unprepared but I am so excited. We will be doing trails and minimal ring work. Anyone with experience with gaited horses or anyone have beginner tips?
    TIA
     
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  2. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    [​IMG]The lady keeping her for me until I can go pick her up sent me this sweet picture
     

  3. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    Honestly..I would find a trainer and have them show me the way to use your legs & hands properly for a Twalker. I've ridden for years..from barrels to dressage. So start with.a trainer, there's alot to learn to enjoy her quality gait.
     
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  4. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Yup a world of difference, and many gaited horses you have to keep them in their gait or they will pace. So, try to work with the seller and ask for pointers on your hands, seat and legs.
     
  5. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    Okay thank you for the pointers. I will try to find a trainer to work with. I was hoping it wouldn't be too different.
     
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  6. Oliveoil

    Oliveoil Well-Known Member

    243
    Sep 3, 2019
    Wisconsin
    So exciting! Just please, please make sure you are keeping her out on pasture. Horses aren't meant to be kept in stalls and it can really cause lots of issues for them.
     
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  7. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

  8. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    Oooooh she's beautiful! I will never get over my desire for a horse. What's her name?
     
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  9. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    Gaited horses will be different than anything you've ever ridden. They need to be ridden correctly, either to train them to gait well or to train some of the gait.

    Gaited horses may have the feeling that they are hot or on edge, but that can come from their body and head carriage, they are very alert movers.

    It's really important that you find someone who can walk you through the breed.

    Now apart from riding, horses are all the same on the ground. Make sure she's got a good diet, has proper hoof care, dentistry, a vet check all around if you didn't do this pre-purchase.
     
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  10. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    A trainer is especially important if you want to canter, you will not be used to a gaited horse's canter, and you really have to work to get it right.
     
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  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with getting a trainer who can help you.
     
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  12. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    I have been looking for a trainer for a little bit but have had no luck so far. She doesn't come home for another couple weeks so I still have some time. I guess its my mess up when I thought there wouldn't be much difference between a gaited and non gaited,
     
  13. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    I named her Sadie. I got her from an auction house. I know you guys are probably thinking that it was dumb of me to get a horse I have no knowledge of riding. I have ridden barrels and eventing but had no clue that gaited horses had such a difference. I have been searching youtube a lot but I know that wont replace actual lessons.
     
  14. Tanya

    Tanya Well-Known Member

    Most beginner equine owners do not understand the difference between a gaited horse and a non-gaited horse. This information is important when deciding on what horse to buy and what you want to do with your horse.

    A gaited horse Stock horses which are quarter horses, appalloosas, paints, and thoroughbreads are not gaited. Then we have horses like Tennesee walking horses, fox trotters, and saddle horses that are gaited. Even though a horse is supposed to be gaited however, that does not mean that it actually is. Some gaited horses are not naturally gaited and so they have to be trained. When a gaited horse has to be trained most of the time their gait is not as smooth. All horses can cantor(lope) but it takes some gaited horses longer to learn the footfall. However, stock horses are used for the faster and more agile events, while most gaited horses are used for pleasure riding and driving. Gaited horses are generally smoother to ride than a non-gaited horse due to their footfall or the way they place their legs. According to a gaited horse website: “Horses perform the trot as a diagonal gait, moving a front foot and the opposite rear foot simultaneously. This action produces a jarring motion that is found in all non-gaited breeds. A horse that is trotting has two feet on the ground at a time, but is not supported at all almost one third of the time. The jar felt when riding a trotting horse is caused by the free fall of the horse and the rise needed to carry the horse from one step of the trot to the next step. A gaited horse does not have free fall or the jar caused by the trot, because the gaited horse has a broken gait that allows at least one foot on the ground at any given time. This creates the smooth ride of a gaited horse because the horse is always supported and never in free fall.”http://www.mofoxtrot.com/trot_gait.htm.

    [​IMG]
    A gaited walking horse being trained by Mike Reel.

    The videos below show the difference of the ride and the way the different types carry themselves. Look for the riders seat and the movement in the gaited horse’s head and legs compared to the stock horse’s head and legs.

    The following video is about gaited horses:



    The following video is about non-gaited horses:

     
  15. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    Thats really helpful. I did find that same video and it definitely is really interesting how they work. Thats really interesting. I haven't yet seen how she walks since she is still in quarantine so I dont know if she is actually gaited. I am assuming since she is a TWH she is but who knows? There is an arena a short drive from my house that is allowing me to use their arena. I did find a TWH barn an hour away that i am reaching out to, hopefully they are accepting students.
     
  16. Madgoat

    Madgoat Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Congratulations, I am wishing you many Happy Trails with your new 4 legged best friend. I will address your question, but first I would like to respond regarding “where” you purchased her. Auctions are not typically a good place to purchase a horse, especially if you are a novice. But, sometimes you can come across a jewel and I hope your girl is just that. Are you getting her papers? If so, research her history and contact previous owners. If not, I would have a vet do a wellness check as soon as possible. You mentioned a TWH farm near you, I suggest you make contact with the owner/trainer and ask if they will evaluate her as soon as you get her home. Like someone else mentioned, not ALL gained horses, gait. I have owned Arabs, Thoroughbreds (surprisingly smooth gaited), Quarter Horses, TWH, and I am now owned by a double registered Spotted Saddle Horse x Fox Trotter mare, who doesn’t gait a lick! My husband’s Fox Trotter is the most naturally gaited horse I’ve ever ridden, so it’s a crap shoot at best.
    Riding a gaited horse is different, they need more “contact” than your western style horse, you will need to learn the “beat” that indicates they are in the correct gait. A lot of TWH’s “pace” which means that the front and back legs move together. A lot of trainers never allow their gated horse to canter. They believe the horse won’t gait as easily. You may have to retrain your mare. Find someone with a dressage trained horse that can canter very collected or a western pleasure horse with a nice 4 beat gait. You should get a real nice rocking horse movement.
    Anyway, I could go on, but I suggest while your are waiting you find a qualified instructor who can not only teach you to ride properly, but can also teach you how to properly care for a horse. So many people get a horse, throw them in a field and think that’s all there is to it. Believe me, a horse is an accident waiting to happen! Do NOT use barbed wire, period! A stall is a good thing but, they need at least 1/2 day out to pasture, i have attached paddocks to my stalls so they can stretch their legs, the fact they poop and pee out in them is a bonus! Good Luck and feel free to reach out to me anytime if you need help. I was lucky to have a strong group of experienced horse owners when I got my first horse and try to play it forward.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
  17. Darby77

    Darby77 Active Member

    339
    Apr 23, 2016
    I don't know anything about gaited horses, but wanted to say congratulations and don't feel dumb. Think of it as an adventure and a chance to learn. You are starting off right asking for help. Goodluck!! She is lovely!
     
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  18. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    @Madgoat I guess I should mention that I do have a ton of horse experience. I have been a groom at an advanced eventing barn for two years. Worked at an Arabian breeding stable and have done ranch work. My family has owned horses for a while too, this just will be the first horse that has belonged to me.
    The auction I got her from is a private auction where they have a soundness and health guarantee or you can bring them back. Their vets are great. Its not like New Holland where they let anything through as long as its walking. The person I hired to bid for me is experienced in what she does with picking horses and was able to try her out beforehand.

    My biggest thing is that everyone I talk to tells me something different some says stick with the gaits she has and don't worry about teaching her anything else and others say ill need to do a lot of work to teach her what shes supposed to do. Every barn I have talked to about working with the both of us has only been interested in bringing her in for training, isn't interested in doing an evaluation to see if she needs training and wont consider the fact I am only interested in casual riding.
     
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  19. Morning Star Farm

    Morning Star Farm Well-Known Member

    375
    Sep 26, 2018
    @Goatzrule I think your best option would be to just find someone very familiar with Tennessee Walkers to ride her for you and go from there. Not necessarily a trainer, just an experienced friendly person who can help. I've ridden several gaited horses and they are very different from non gaited, in a fun way! But I never got to feel their special gaits. With one, a Peruvian Paso, I asked the lady what she would do if I asked her and she said she would probably try an offbeat trot because I didn't know the exact way to cue her. The naturally gaited horses are the easiest. I used to ride a Rocky Mountain Pony who was a dream. His trot was so smooth and effortless and it didn't take anything special to ask him for it. With a gaited horse who has been trained to gait, you are going to have to find out what they understand. When friends of mine bought Tennessee walkers, the seller was a trainer and showed them how to ride the horses and let them get the feel of it several times before they brought them home. There are some trainers out there who are willing to work with you and the horse, but they can be hard to find. Unfortunately, for some it is all about the $ and shows. There is nothing wrong with getting a horse from a reputable auction either. The horse world can be a bit quick to judge at times especially if you get into serious competition. But on a casual level, you have a better chance of finding some wonderful people to help you. Maybe you can try contacting the walker horse Association and seeing if there are any clubs or lesson trainers in your area?
     
  20. Madgoat

    Madgoat Well-Known Member Supporting Member

     
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