Newbie First Freshener Question

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by Littlealps, Jan 25, 2019.

  1. Littlealps

    Littlealps New Member

    4
    Jan 25, 2019
    Oregon
    Hi all! I have a yearling alpine that was bred when I purchased her. She's due in a few weeks, has never had vaccinations or any wormer other than herbal. She was in okay condition at first but I've noticed her getting a little thin. I just finished another round of herbal wormer, it's been only 4 weeks between. Famacha score is not great. She gets free choice grass, one flake alfalfa, 1/2 lb alfalfa pellets, 3/4 cup of BOSS, and a handful of dried raspberry leaves. Also free choice minerals with copper that she doesn't seem to like. I don't want the kids to get too big so have been trying to not over feed. My question is would it make good sense to go ahead and give her safeguard now? Or wait till after kidding? Does the feed sound like enough? She's also shedding a bit despite freezing temps.
    Thanks!
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    I'd have a fecal done to include coccidia.
     
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  3. SandyNubians

    SandyNubians Well-Known Member

    Feb 18, 2017
    Idaho
    I agree. Get a fecal first and see what you are dealing with. With that, I would also check her for lice as well I had a bred girl get thin, fecal was fine and I was confused. Then I realized she had sucking lice.
     
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  4. Goat Whisperer

    Goat Whisperer Well-Known Member

    557
    Dec 3, 2018
    I also agree :) A fecal will (hopefully) give you some answers.

    Any stress can cause a parasite bloom, so it’s pretty normal for a bloom to happen after a move. When we sell a goat, we always check the fecal and show the soon-to-be owners the results. Even if the goat has a low parasite load, we will sometimes deworm more as a prevention since they are about to go through a major stress. The hormones of late gestation can also cause a bloom. I’m all for herbals, but you may need to consider a chemical dewormer once you get the fecal results back.

    I would also consider giving an actual feed. The alfalfa is great, but may not meet her needs in late pregnancy. She is only a yearling, she is still growing herself and now feeding a kid or kids. I know all our standard dairy does HAVE to have feed, even though they have quality hay and minerals.

    With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” with goats and I always recommend finding and establishing a relationship with a vet. I hope you’ll keep us updated on your new girl and let us know when she kids!
     
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  5. Dwarf Dad

    Dwarf Dad Well-Known Member

    Welcome to the forum! I don't want to upset you, but that much BOSS could be keeping your doe from absorbing nutrients in her other feed. The oil builds up in their intestines. I usually see others, and also do, feed a couple of tablespoons per day.
     
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  6. Littlealps

    Littlealps New Member

    4
    Jan 25, 2019
    Oregon
    I appreciate the feedback, I will lower the amount. Thanks!
     
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  7. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    Welcome from me, too! :) Those raspberry leaves sound just DELICIOUS! :) Mine loved to eat leaves of many kinds, especially direct from the trees! ;)

    Most goats are, after all, mainly twig and leave eaters, they like grain, but a great amount is not so good for their guts.

    When getting a goat "married" too young, I used to follow the advice from our "king of goat veterinary medicine", Karl-Erik Hammarberg: Feed as much as you can during first half of pregnancy, to make the young mother grow as much as possible herself. During the last half of the pregnancy, the kid(s) grow at most, and the young mother cannot grow herself. So then cut down the fodder (this is very unpopular! ;) ) to prevent the kids from growing too much. The trick is to get a round piece of bone (scull) through a ring of bone (pelvis?).

    This "emergency" advice is valid if the mother is very young. Yours is probably normal size.

    Concerning minerals, one single goat will not need so much that is shows in the bucket. But, of course, you could try an additional kind of salt and/or mineral. If you have a small herd, it might pay to ask neighbours with cows or sheep to buy small pieces of their minerals.

    For my part, I used to have a fecal sample analyzed before deworming, to prevent resistent tribes.

    Good luck now, dear fellow goat midwife, and, again, WELCOME!
     
  8. Littlealps

    Littlealps New Member

    4
    Jan 25, 2019
    Oregon
    Thanks for the idea, I'd not thought that would be a problem with a foot of snow on the ground.
    I checked this morning for lice and found some, so treated with food grade DE and then misted with vinegar, tea tree, peppermint, and clove oil. I'll try and find a magnifying glass and determine what kind of lice they are. Also treated their bedding that got changed the other day.
     
  9. Littlealps

    Littlealps New Member

    4
    Jan 25, 2019
    Oregon
    Very helpful advice! My minerals are the best I could find, I got them from a goat dairy that adds extra copper and selenium (our area is deficient). This doe is a bit on the small side for an alpine. My other doe (I have two) was two months older when bred and she's noticeably larger but it could also be genetics as her mamma was big. I've had them since September and am learning all kinds of things as fast as I can! :)
     
  10. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    Lack of selenium can be dangerous. Intoxication also possible. Genetics or nutrition or mere age, the important thing is that the kid can pass out.

    Welcome again to the Knowledge Exchange Goat Spot! :)
     
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  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  12. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    How is your pregnant doe now?

    I would begin feeding her some grain/goat pellets to get her stomach used to them as she will need the additional calories, fat, and protein for lactation.
     
  13. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California