Newbie Kidding Thread 2020-2021

Discussion in 'Waiting Room' started by YouGoatMe, Nov 1, 2020.

  1. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    Wow, that is a cute baby! Congratulations! I can see why you want to keep him. His markings look like one of my does. He's only going to get more and more handsome as he grows. :inlove:
     
  2. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Aaaaawwwww! :inlove::kid::inlove:
     
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  3. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    He is ADORABLE...I see a case of Goat Math starting..lets an.old forum..that is sooo funny.
     
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  4. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    337
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    He’s gorgeous!! Those eyes! And those ears!! I love Mini Nubians.
     
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  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Glad she passed the afterbirth. :)
     
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  6. YouGoatMe

    YouGoatMe Well-Known Member

    259
    May 31, 2020
    Texas
    Both babies and mamas are still doing fantastic! I noticed Soleil's udder was lopsided and very full on one side. I couldn't get baby to latch on to it, so I milked her out for a few minutes and very quickly got 14 oz. I didn't empty her, but it felt much less tight after. Does the milk still have colostrum? I put it in 3 oz. bags and stuck it in the freezer just in case.
     
  7. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Glad to hear they are all doing so well! :clapping:
    Good job noticing the lopsided udder and milking her!
    Yes, the milk still has colostrum. Very good idea to save it for an emergency! Good thinking! It helps to label it with date and “day 2”, but you probably did that already. :)
     
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  8. YouGoatMe

    YouGoatMe Well-Known Member

    259
    May 31, 2020
    Texas
    Thank you!! Good to know. I didn't add day two, just the date. But I still make a note of it.
     
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  9. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    20
    Nov 2, 2020
    California
     
  10. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    20
    Nov 2, 2020
    California
    I have had new mothers have a kid, walk away and forget about the first one after the 2nd or third one comes.
    Had one new doe have her first kid in big boulders where most of them had their kids. Problem was it was in the middle of the night during a cold rainstorm. She headed for cover, left the kid, who died from exposure, then had the second one under cover.
    I had one doe who had 3 kids, as time went on, she ignored one of them who we fed by bottle.
    Have pulled several kids, some reverse presntation, a couple huge kids, too big for the doe to pass.
     
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  11. jmsdvm

    jmsdvm New Member

    13
    Apr 1, 2014
    Horns, especially on Angora are critically important as temperature regulating devices! They act as radiators for body heat! None of our goats are ever disbudded and the ones that lose horns by accident definitely miss them. I find that horned goats are no more aggressive; in fact, just a threat from a horned goat is enough to end an argument, often much faster than having disbudded goats go at it till one has a headache. Just don't allow them to push at you, *ever*. Of course, our Angora are very sweet-tempered, even the bucks (they are told early on that they will end up in freezer camp if they aren't polite.)
     
  12. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    20
    Nov 2, 2020
    California
    I have seen no data proving that horns have a temp regulating function. But i have seen a yearling Alpine doe with horns threaten my 200+ lb buck. And have heard of udders ripped, eyes poked, and yesterday had to pull my neighbors Nigerian doe out of our fence. They were not home: luckily our 100% weather has passed.
    If you can not disbud, find a vet who can.
     
  13. YouGoatMe

    YouGoatMe Well-Known Member

    259
    May 31, 2020
    Texas
    The majority of our older goats have their horns so I have decided to let these keep theirs also. The two oldest does we have were both disbudded and have scurs that grow every now and then. I do find it interesting that our does without horns are the leaders of the herd. First and second in command! I respect different opinions on disbudding or not though, and am always trying to learn more.
     
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  14. Caileigh Jane Smith

    Caileigh Jane Smith Well-Known Member

    527
    Dec 1, 2019
    Missouri, USA
    Thanks for sharing your babies! They are so cute! I'm definitely getting antsy for some more goat kids of my own, and I haven't even bred my does yet!
     
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  15. YouGoatMe

    YouGoatMe Well-Known Member

    259
    May 31, 2020
    Texas
    Here's a few pictures from our outside adventures today. They are so much fun!! We are still mainly penning moms and babies in their own stalls. How long do we need to keep them like that? At what point do they join the general population and how do I not worry that one of the other goats is going to be mean??

    I do plan on milking Soleil after 2 or 3 weeks. My plan with her was to separate her and baby overnight, milk in the morning and then reunite them during the day. Please let me know if that isn't a good plan! 124544526_726601651614114_9204610177356496648_n.jpg 124930668_665965680768479_1699164342420604620_n.jpg 125125530_452603412368378_6867892481171963228_n.jpg 124186081_2717856678468648_1177344619994387211_n.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2020
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  16. Caileigh Jane Smith

    Caileigh Jane Smith Well-Known Member

    527
    Dec 1, 2019
    Missouri, USA
    Oh my! They are so cute! Thank you for sharing. The main thing to watch when you integrate them back in with the herd, is to make sure that the other goats are not going to be aggressive to the babies, and also, that the babies are active enough to be able to get out of the way of the older goats. You will want to be sure that the moms and babies have bonded well enough that the babies will be able to continue nursing once their moms have integrated back in with the other goats.

    This was my first year with milking, so others with more experience will have even more input for you. Separating at night and milking in the morning was what I did with my does, and it worked well. The only issue would be to watch that the babies are not being too aggressive with their mother's udder when you first put them back together after you milk.
     
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  17. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Beautiful babies! Thanks for the pictures!
    :inlove::inlove:
     
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  18. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    337
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    We prefer to let our goats keep their horns as well, although that does have its downsides of course. I think whether you disbud or keep your goats horned, there will be both pros and cons, and you just have to decide what you’d rather do. :)

    I also just wanted to say that I, too, separated my doe and kids overnight for milk sharing, and it worked well for me. I’ve heard that a lot of people use that method with good results.

    Best of luck!! Also, I might be slightly in love with your little Mini Nubian buck. :D
     
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  19. YouGoatMe

    YouGoatMe Well-Known Member

    259
    May 31, 2020
    Texas
    I'm totally in love with him! I think he's in love with me too though....he started humping my boot earlier today. Too much love for me, lol!! We will definitely be using him for breeding our other Nubian and Boer though so I get to keep him and I'm sooo happy!!
     
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