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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing all my research before I get a goat or two. I would really like one as a pet/companion and to eat the weeds and poison ivy around my place. I'm also strapped for cash so a luxury pen is beyond my reach right now.

Any thoughts or tips?
 

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Steel posts and a few cattle panels make good pens, and won't break the bank. For smaller goats like Dwarf Nigerians, Pygmy's, or the mini breeds, a large Igloo type dog house would work as shelter for one or two. If you have a company in your area that does field fertilizing, check with them about a used fertilizer tank that has a hole in it. The tank can be refurbished to make a shelter for a standard sized goat or two. Hoop houses - a cattle panel bowed and attached to the ground via a wooden frame, steel posts, etc. - then covered with a tarp makes a good shelter, too. I've also used old gates and metal panels wired together and covered with a tarp for shelter. If you know someone who has a small trailer they aren't using and you could borrow, that could be made into shelter. I hope this helps, and good luck with your new goats! :)
 

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I have seen some real nice enclosures made from pallets/skids. You can usually find them for free.
In my opinion it is better to have something you can go into with the goats rather than just a dog house.
Especially in the winter when you want to spend time with them. Also a barn/shed would be better for food and water and hay storage.
We were lucky to have a post building on our property that we could fix up. We just used OSB for siding to keep the cost down and just put 3 coats of paint on it to keep it from rotting.

For our Nigerians we used rolls of 5' welded utility fence from the home improvement store. It was inexpensive as far as fencing goes. Like $40ish for a 50 foot roll. We used t-posts mostly with wooden posts at each corner. It has been working great so far. The wooden posts really make it sturdy. Enough for our girls anyway.

We got ours for pets too. Now we decided we will try breeding one each year for milk for us. We thought it might be fun to make cheese, soap etc too.

Nigerians were the best pet choice for us. We wanted a small goat that wouldn't be too intimidating to our kids. At first we thought Pigmy but after looking for awhile we really liked the colors of the Nigerians more.

Good luck with your new adventure!
 

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2 goats will be happier than one. They need companionship.

Pallets work for fencing but cattle panels will contain them really well and last longer.

Go to CraigsList. You might be able to find a free or almost free shed there that would be ideal. You might even find fencing.
 

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I have one nigerian and one Pygmy. I have a 3ft high wire fencing with green metal posts every 8 ft or so pulled as tight I could, and I'm a woman so if I can do it lol! I uses one fiberglass post from the horses electric fence weaving through the wire fence at any points that the top is wavy. Mine are on hills so the fence will never be super tight and sturdy but it works perfectly. Little igloo dog house for the two to sleep
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the ideas! I think I can get some fencing and enough pallets off my Amish neighbors to build a shed and reasonable enclosure.
I'm hoping to start out with two Pygmys then maybe dairy or meat goats in the future.
 

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I am getting goats tomorrow and was not sure about structure and fencing. I bought a couple of electric netting fence and solar charger and built a goat shed on a sled to drag around the pasture. We will somehow well it works. The fenced area gives about 80 feet per side and is full of sumac and poison ivy along with sweet clover, etc....

If experiment works I will start on permanent fencing and use netting to sub divide.
 

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Omg be careful with poison ivy!!! My two boys love it and I love them and I picked my boy up ad was holding him and he gave it to me!!! If you want to hold and pet them do not let them in the poison ivy the oils are invisible and bond to your skin cells within 2 hours of contact while you didn't even know you touched it!

image-2103084473.jpg

2 weeks ago ugh!! I'm still healing have it on my legs too
 

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Congratulations! Welcome to the wonderful, exasperating, annoying, hilarious, frustrating world of goats. :)
 

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Omg be careful with poison ivy!!! My two boys love it and I love them and I picked my boy up ad was holding him and he gave it to me!!! If you want to hold and pet them do not let them in the poison ivy the oils are invisible and bond to your skin cells within 2 hours of contact while you didn't even know you touched it!

2 weeks ago ugh!! I'm still healing have it on my legs too
Duh! I never thought of that. I got it too about a month ago and couldn't figure out how in the world I got. Now I know. :)
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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It takes a bit of looking but look for companies that supply crop growers with the big poly tanks of fertilizers. They often times ever year get lots that have holes in them or the valves break. They cant fix em so they just bust em up and throw em in the trash. A 1000 gallon poly take with large sections of the bottom cut out and a hole for a door way make outstanding fast and free goatie homes. Then pen around em with combo panels and tee posts.
 
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