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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yesterday we noticed that one of our does had a teat that was larger than the other. She was acting normal and eating fine and was extremely hard to catch as always. Upon feeling her, she has one teat that is swollen and hard/lumpy. I didn't notice any heat to it. It looks like maybe it has something dark colored at the tip? Our vet is out until Tuesday. Today she is still acting normal. Anyone know what this could be? She is a Spanish/Boer cross and about three years old. She hasn't had a kid on her since last year and she was just bred maybe two weeks ago. Could she get mastitis while not in milk? I'm wondering if we should give her an antibiotic until we can get her to a vet. If so, what kind? Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay. The vet is not in until Tuesday but we will try to massage and milk it out until he's back. We are thinking of giving her a dose of Bio-Mycin since a vet trip is two days out. I can't find what this could be besides some type of injury causing an infection.
 

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If this is mastitis, or an injury causing an infection, or..... Giving an antibiotic, Bio-Mycin, will alter the test results of the milk to determine which treatment would be needed. Giving an antibiotic means to continue giving it for the full course. If Bio-Mycin isn't the correct antibiotic (gram negative versus gram positive germs) nothing would be gained except possibly building a resistance for that particular antibiotic and delaying the testing needed to identify the germ until it is out of the system.

Be sure to wash your hands and the teat well before milking and having a teat dip for after the milking is finished is recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you! Im afraid around here the vets usually make an educated guess on which antibiotic. In fact most goat farms here actually treat things without vets because goats are given the same treatment as they would for cattle at the vet. This seems such an odd case that we will ask for a sample to be sent off to see what we have.
 
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