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Luvs her Goats
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I have a doe who has never been bred or milked. Every year (app. 4 in a row) she grows an udder which eventually disappears no problem. This year, one side of her udder has gotten quite large and is tight and warm to the touch. She is obviously uncomfortable as she keeps trying to rub her udder on things. I never thought anything about it because, as I said, the udder always goes away on its own. As I have 10 wethers and only 2 does and never have kids or have to deal with udders, pregnancies or the problems that go along with them, I'm not too sure what I should do. Any advice or suggestions would be great. I really hate seeing her in any kind of pain.
 

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Luvs her Goats
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. I wasn't sure whether to milk her or not. I have penicillan to treat her with and ran down to vets to get something for pain. I also have Special Formula which is used to treat mastitis in cows, I can use that on her udder. I'll use some warm cloths on her udder and milk her. She's never been milked, so I'm sure it will be an interesting experience for us both. :eek:

I haven't taken her temperature but will do that as soon as I go down to barn to treat her.

I'll let you know how things go. And thanks for the advice. Treating does with udder problems is waaaaaaay out of my experience range. Give me a wether and I can tell you anything, and my 2 does are never bred, so neither them or I are exposed to pregnancy or udder problems. LOL.
 

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Goat Girl
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Wash your hands really good when you go to milk her, wash her udder and wear gloves. Get a very clean vial, or something sterile to put a milk sample in. When you milk her, milk some of it into the container so you have a sample to take to the vet for testing so you know what you are dealing with. This is very important if what you infuse with the first time does not work, then you have a clean sample, before you infused anything to take in and have tested to determine what meds should be used to combat her mastitis. You can freeze the sample and wait to have it tested to see if the Special Formula works first.

The Special Formula needs to be infused into her udder. Have you ever done that before? It is not hard to do, if you haven't. After she is milked out, clean the end of her teat again, line up the cannula on the tube with her orifice, hold it steady and kind of push the cannula up while at the same time, rolling the end of the teat down over it. You only want to insert the cannula a little ways into her teat, not even half an inch. Once you do this, try to keep the teat rolled over the end of the cannula and push the plunger to insert the meds into her teat/udder. If nothing comes out, it is going in. If it comes out or she moves, just repeat and try again. I have done does that are very uncooperative and it can take a while to get it all in there. Once you do, put one finger over the end of her teat to block the orifice and using your thumb and fore-finger run it up the length of her teat starting at the bottom and going to the top to move the meds up into her udder, then massage her udder really well to get the meds worked into the tissue. You will most likely have to milk her out again in 12 to 24 hours and do another infusion.

I hope that makes sense!
 

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Luvs her Goats
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great post, PTGoats45. Unfortunately, I was already at the barn and milked her, so I didn't get a sample. I'm encouraged because there was no blood, clotting, lumps etc. Just normal looking (albeit slightly watery) milk coming out. Her udder is half the size it was and tightness is gone, it's much more pliable and not as red now. Warmth is less as well. She has no temperature. I looked at the end of the Special Formula tube and thought "No way is that going up her teat." But if you say it does, I'll give it a try later when I go to put goats to bed. I did give her penicillan and some anafen for pain. She seems to be so relieved after being milked. I could kick myself for not doing it sooner. I just figured her udder would grow and then disappear like it does every year, so when I looked at her, I saw what I expected to see, not what was really happening. Poor thing needed milking so badly. I'll keep her on penicillan for 5 days and pain killer for a couple of days and milk her as needed. If I see any change in her temperature or signs of infection or she stops eating, drinking etc. I'll get a milk sample and take to vet for testing. She ran outside and started chowing down on grass when after I milked her, and her eyes lost that wide-eyed, wild look that let me know she was suffering. I think she'll be okay.
 

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Luvs her Goats
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, I'll definitely get some of the Special Formula into her tomorrow. I noticed just a short while ago that she is somewhat bloated and seems to be wandering around as if looking for a place to lay down. LOL. I swear, if I didn't know she could not be pregnant, I'd swear she was getting ready to give birth.
 
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