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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This happened a month or so ago.
And I wanted some imput on it.

I was out walking the goats on our regular route.
So the goats know where they are and where home is.

Well we seen a deer. Or should I say "they" seen
the deer first. And they took off for home at a dead run.
"fend for yourself sucker!"

They stopped about half way home and waited for
me to catch up.

What I want to know is what if we were in
a area they were not familar with? Would they
still run off?

I had been working them with the dog. They normally
run and stop near me until the dog trots on by.

Thank you, R
 

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At the rendy, my goats did that when they saw the cow the first time. The second time they were fine.

Three of my goats are well bonded to me, so I don't worry about them taking off by themselves. The two older ones are the ones I worry about. So on the long trail for the overnighter, I just kept Diego where I could get a hold of him.

We had no problems, it was just a security factor.

The younger ones, without the others just circle and come back to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe the culprit is the nigerian.
She is kinda wild. Just now taking grain
from my hand. And yet she is the first
in line of my pack of two.

I bought her a dog pack. But will
not put anything on her I need.
R.
 

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I am new to packing goats.

I have had goats since 1984. I even got up to a herd of 35... all of which I took on walks. I never needed leads, or any type of ropes, I was dominant doe and they knew it!

The problem is likely, they have not bonded into a herd yet.
When you get a new animal, it takes awhile for them to accept the human in the herd, and especially if the human is herd leader.

It is much easier to begin with bottle babies, and get them bonded from a young age. I bought my future herd sire, before he was 24 hours old.

This might be crazy, but, I would tie that skittish goat to my belt and anytime you are outside, it is forced to accompany you in every task that you do. You might even have to flip it a few times to show it that you are dominant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lucy the nigerian.
Was not handled humanely by
her previous owners.
I have had her about 2 months.
And have spent that time gaining
her trust.
At first she was dragging a 6 foot rope.
Just to catch her. We are down to
a 1 1/2 foot rope now. And she
is coming to me for treats. Even seemed to enjoy
a scratch or two. She will never be
as affectionate as Sully the Togg.
He was bottle fed. Lucy was originally
gotten so Sully would have a freind.
And sorry I did fall for her blue eyes
and color. Hindsite. I should of passed
on her and gotten another packgoat.
but it is what it is.

I do enjoy her fiesty attitude.
I was accually shocked that she loves
to go on the walks off leash. Knows her name.
Is not as independent as Sully. He ignores
me. She doesn't.

If she had been bottle fed. Things would of been
different.
She is fearful of humans.
So I will not be flipping her at this stage in
the game. But a leash when we end up accually
packing is a good Idea.
And when the snow comes. She may even enjoy
my company.

Thanks.
 

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You are so right, when they have been mistreated. I am more used to goats, just getting too big for their britches, and being wild because they are just full of p and v.

I would try some tiny slices of carrots, or maybe even some raisins in my pocket, and really...maximize contact with her. Be gentle, but don't let her avoid contact with you.

If she was mistreated and you have only had her for 2 months it is too early for her to be anything but skittish in any new situation. Time, closeness, and lots of grooming, and attention is all you can do. After about a year she should be good, unless you yell at her, then she may cower again for a bit. I bet she will respond quickly to a soft no, once you gain her trust 100%.

I remember getting those kinds of goats in my early years. It only took doing it once to know better. But, you do what you can with what you have!
 

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She is a cutie!

You know, I thought about it, now my goats were all pets, the wild ones had been long removed, but we moved a few hundred miles away from "home". And when I took them for a walk, they wanted in sight of me, or at least the truck at all times. If anything frightened them, they wanted their human herd members, any human herd member, or the truck!

If you haul them somewhere unfamiliar, and they are walking with you and get frightened, most likely they will run to you or the truck.
 

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I was in an unfamiliar area with two of my goats and dog. My dog scared up a couple of baby deer and started chasing them. I was upset with the dog and took off running after her and yelling her name. The goats took off running next to me. A few seconds later Clayton was splayed on the ground with his head smashed flat on the ground. Absolutely no movement from him. I had only momentary panic at what I thought was his sudden death. I noticed that the mother deer had stood up out of the brush about 30 feet away. I'm sure he thought that the reason for my running and yelling was because of the big brown forest monster that emerged from the willow and that the safest strategy was to hide and play dead. I had to coax him up and he stuck to me like glue afer that.
Denise
Magic Bean Farm
 

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Poor Clayton. We had a goat kid get away during one of the rendis. Rex found him the next morning down behind a log so scared he couldn't move anything but his ears after a whole night out with coyotes all around. Petrified but OK.
 

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ryorkies:

That doesn't look like a Nigerian Dwarf. That looks like an Arapawa. They have that exact coloration, horn shape, etc. I have an Arapawa named Millie, and I wouldn't go hiking without her.

Arapawa are from New Zealand. They are feral goats, descended from the British Apline goats, which were brought by settlers to New Zealand. They went wild, and until recently, were left in peace, but there has lately been a campaign to kill them all because of property damage.

To preserve their valuable gene pool, some were redomesticated. Honestly, you would never know they were feral. Millie is the sweetest little darling, but she's tough as nails and she's got a solid eye for danger. She doesn't tire easily, and she keeps up with my saanen, who is twice her size, even in deep snow.

Great find!
 
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