Ok just a question

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by sixshooterfarm, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. sixshooterfarm

    sixshooterfarm New Member

    580
    Oct 18, 2007
    Valley Springs, Ca
    Now, this is just a question, and I want everyone's PERSONAL opinion, this is not a debate of who does what right or wrong, I just want to see who does what and why so I can figure some things out. What would you guys do if you have tested your goats and one or more of them were CAE positive? And why would you do what you do. Has anyone ever had a goat test positive, if so what did you do with that goat. Now I am talking about doe's, bucks I am not too worried about as it is not a sexually transmitted disease. Mainly doe;s, like if one of my does tested positive would I just pull all the babies that were born and bottle feed them or just outright get rid of the doe? I am about to test my entire herd, and to be honest with you, I am scared to death, what happens if one test positive, what happens if my entire herd tested psoitive!!!! :shrug: Just asking, I dont want any fights on here ok!!!!!
     
  2. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    LOL, I know what you mean about being scared. I am too, this will be our first anual test, I have only bought animals from very very clean herds, but for some reason I am scared! I really don't know what I would do. Hopefully I never have to decide!
     

  3. sixshooterfarm

    sixshooterfarm New Member

    580
    Oct 18, 2007
    Valley Springs, Ca
    I just dont know, I mean you can get animals from one of the cleanest herds in the world, but that dont mean they dont have CAE. I mean I really think that CAE is blown WAYYYYY out of proportion. I mean ok, so CAE is not something you want, BUT if you DO have or or get it, just be the responsible goat owner and put the babies from the CAE positive doe on pasturized milk....and continue to do that with all her babies. It is the breeders who have CAE positive that dont do a darn thing about it and they keep passing the disease on and not telling the people that buy the goats. Now if my tests come up positive, and I sold babies from the positive doe, I would be contacting the people that I could who have bought babies from her, that is what I would. I wouldnt euthinize my doe, I might find them a nice pet home, but then again that dosent stop the disease, the pet owners would just continue to breed her and pass on the disease. Oh heck I dont know, I think that is what I would do, is just have a seperate herd and be VERY VERY careful. I hopefully will be sending in blood soon!
     
  4. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    It is definatly a tough decision! And something to think about.
     
  5. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    If a doe of mine was positive I would pull the kids right at birth and then bottle feed them milk replacer. I would dry up the doe as fast as I could. If I had more then one positive doe I would let them be together till they were dry again.

    I probably wouldn't purposefully breed her again unless she came from realy good lines. I would just let her live out her life as a pet.
     
  6. cougcowgirl

    cougcowgirl Member

    50
    Oct 5, 2007
    Yakima, WA
    ok usually i dont post on subjects like this, but today i feel like it since my dad and i were having this same conversation about a week ago. I was raised with CAE in my goats....yeah we pulled and bottle raised, but my favorite (and best in show) doe was CAE positive, if i would have sold her as soon as she came back + i would have never won anything and probably wouldnt have continued and grown to love these critters as much as i do. She also didnt like being milked so she got to raise her babies...lucky for me she had bucklings every year but one so they all went to butcher. The one year she did have AND RAISE a doeling that girl never ONCE came back positive NEVER...and she died last year at 9 years old. he quit testing when we got out of showing so much and went to a boer herd....honestly...i know i dont have anything positive right now, but if one came back positive i dont think i would be able to sell her. I get attached to these girls....and was raised around CAE positive does and yeah it can be hard on them, but some live full happy lives without showign any symptoms (my BOS doe Ears was one of those) never got the swollen knees or anything. I dont know...i can't say what i do is right for anyone but me or my dad, but it works for us and we have some pretty kick butt goats in my opinion :)
     
  7. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    I knew a lady that had a well known herd, she told me that she had 3 positive goats but she kept them around because they were a very important part of her herd. She said that she always kept her positives in with her negatives and still tested yearly. The negatives never came back positive even though they were kept with positives. She was on CAE prevention anyway, but she said she never used a milking machine on the positives and she always milked them last and just threw their milk away. If I had a positive doe, and if she was of some importance to me, I'd bottlefeed her kids and throw her milk away.

    IMO, if they aren't showing signs, and otherwise appear healthy, then they shouldn't be put down, esp. if they are of some great value to you. If they are showing signs of hard udders, chronic arthritis, chronic pneumonia, or enchephilatic signs, or are showing any other signs of pain or discomfort, then they should be put down. There have been a lot of positive goats that lived long healthy lives and never showed signs of the disease.

    Back thirty years ago when they were culling all positive goats, there were many lines that were lost. If you think about it, if we killed every positive goat, then we wouldn't have a lot of lines around that we do today. An interesting fact, did you know that the granddam of +B Timber*Cove M Sir Hershey was CAE positive? Hershey is the sire of the National Champion, of 18 permanent champion offspring, the grandsire of the Reserve National Champion, and the grandsire of the Premier Sire at this years Nationals.

    That's just my .02 cents on the matter :wink: