Our Spanish Herdsire Calfee Farms "Lucky Strike"

Discussion in 'Goat of the Month' started by Calfee Farms, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    Lucky is 3 years old in this picture and weighs approximately 250+lbs. He's our senior herdsire.
     

  2. ArborGoats

    ArborGoats Well-Known Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    He is certainly a tank!
     
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  3. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    Thanks! He has produced a lot of great kids for us. His black coat, hooves, and horns are definitely a heritable trait.
     
  4. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    US
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  6. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    Thanks
     
  7. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
  8. Goat_Scout

    Goat_Scout Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2017
    Louisiana
    Beautiful buck!!
     
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  9. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    I'd love to hear about the Spanish Goat breed! Is there a registry? What is the history of the breed?
     
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  10. lottsagoats1

    lottsagoats1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2014
    Middle Maine
    Very nice! Are you the breeder or did you buy him?
     
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  11. groovyoldlady

    groovyoldlady Goat Crazy!

    Jul 21, 2011
    Central Maine
    Be still my heart! That is one HANDSOME boy!!!!!!!
     
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  12. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    The Spanish Goat is a landrace breed of goat. After every major European explorer brought livestock, goats included, to the Americas for meat, milk, and hides. These explorers turned these goats loose so that when they returned the goats would have multiplied and there would be an ample supply of goats for meat and hides across the southern US. The Spanish Goat lived for over 600 years feral and very hardy and able to take care of themselves because only the smartest and strongest goats survived. There once was millions of Spanish goats but crossbreeding with other breeds of meat goats because Spanish Goats mommas are so awesome at raising babies and a lot of them has left only 7,000 proven pure 100% Spanish Goats left in the world with Calfee Farms owning approximately 40+ of those 7,000. This goat is THE 1st and original goat of the Americas and its purpose was and still is solely a meat goat. There is today a brand new registry for Spanish goats because of the dishonesty of some selling and attempting to pass off dairy cross and stockyard goats with indiscriminate breeding with the Spanish look as the real thing. The new registry is in the process of collecting DNA of Spanish Goats from ranches who have been raising these goats for several generations over 200 years and creating a data bank of sorts. Within the Spanish Goat breed is 15 different bloodlines named after the families who have bred their 100% Spanish Goats for decades and some for 2 centuries. The Spanish goat is near extinction so with their rich history, the wild/ "survival of the fittest" toughness, and relative rarity of these goats, we felt a "calling" to do our part to save and conserve this noble/ majestic breed of meat goat. How rare are these goats??? The Spanish Goat is listed on the "watch list" in the American Livestock Conservancy. Visit www.spanishgoats.org for more information about Spanish Goats.
     
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  13. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    Thanks Lottsagoats1! : ) Our very first Spanish goat we ever owned "Nacho" a Sawyer Spanish buck we bought from a man that was a hundred or so miles away. He went to Texas and bought a small herd of Spanish goats and brought them to the hills of Tennessee. He would not ever sell a doe but I convinced him to sell me a buck. We bred Nacho to every Texas Genemaster and Kiko doe we owned and were amazed at the quality he added to our commercial herd of goats so much so that we decided to go all in and make the switch to all Spanish Goats. We contacted The Koy Ranch in Eldorado, Texas and put an order for a small herd of their all black Spanish goats that actually put on a coat of cashmere in winter but she'd it in summer to reveal a slick, shiny short coat that's black and somewhat reflective in full sunlight. We bought another buck from them and since then have added several other bloodlines of Spanish goats to the herd and now we have near 40 breeding does. We have customers in 12 different states from Texas to Indiana to Virginia to Kentucky. We sell out of our weaned kids every single year. This past year, we added a Devil's River Spanish herdsire and this bloodline, per the Spanish Goat Association, is the rarest bloodline out there and being a blue colored one makes him even more rare. We bred him to every doe we have for Last week of December/ New Year babies.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
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  14. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    IMG_1037.JPG IMG_1063.JPG Wow, your information is fascinating & I can't wait to learn more from the website. You sound like a real asset to your breed! Have you heard of San Clemente Island Goats? They are a sort of younger, west coast counterpart to your breed. While some believe that their ancestors were left on the Channel Islands of CA by the Spanish explorers, there's more evidence that they were brought by the Padres in the Spanish Mission times. The isolation on the island ensured their genetic purity until the 1980s when they were exterminated, leaving only a hundred or 2 rescues on the mainland to maintain the breed. We also have bloodlines (only 8 or 9) & are also wondering about DNA testing but don't know where to start. San Clementes are a critically endangered breed known mainly for the bucks' attributes: incredible horns & a deficiency of scent glands, though the does are valued for ease of kidding & extremely high butterfat milk (one tested at 7%!)
     
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  15. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
     
  16. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    Catharine,

    I had read the history of the San Clemente goat and think it is very fascinating. I have always thought that your goats and my goats probably were of the same European ancestors. Yeah, your San Clemente goat is even more rare than my Spanish goat. Thanks for the kind words. Sounds like you are a great asset to the San Clemente Goat breed as well. Are you a member of the Livestock Conservancy? They are a wealth of knowledge and resources for rare farm critters such as ours. Our Spanish Goat coordinator I think, collaborated with Dr. Sponenburg of the Livestock Conservancy and they started the Spanish Goat Conservation Society. She had to do this because of the dishonesty of people passing off stockyard goats that looked like a Spanish-type goat and were selling them as the real deal. The introduction of the Angora goat in the early 1900's, and then the importation of the big beautiful Boer goat in 1993 just about ruined pure Spanish goats because long time breeders of Spanish goats payed thousands of dollars for a Boer buck and bred them to every single Spanish goat they had due to the high prices even % bucks were bringing $30,000. So the Spanish doe being such a good tough momma is great but it has also been its downfall because they are and were used in cross breeding.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2017
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  17. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    It must be really hard to verify the bloodlines of pure Spanish goats to get a registry established. I can't imagine the challenge!
     
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  18. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Yes, it's hard to imagine many purebred Spanish Goats surviving! Thank goodness for those few breeders! San Clementes had their isolated island to keep them pure until the eradication. Where were the last feral herds of the Spanish Goats?
     
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  19. Calfee Farms

    Calfee Farms Active Member

    138
    Oct 10, 2017
    Corryton, TN
    I believe it is. The goat producer must provide a couple of pics of the goat(s), then pluck 50 tail hairs and mail them in. The owner of the goat also has to provide a paper trail i.e. to prove they bought the goat(s) from a breeder that has been thoroughly researched and is listed on the website as an approved breeder. It is a long process but this is a necessary process to insure the breed is pure.
     
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