Parasite susceptibility genetic?

Discussion in 'Bucks' started by NDinKY, Sep 7, 2020.

  1. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Is parasite resistance/susceptibility genetic?

    My keeper buckling from this year has not matured anywhere near how I wanted. He’s had 2 rounds of treatment for coccidiosis, just treated tapeworms, and now has dog poo like poop again. He looked so good as a baby but I’m so disappointed in how he has matured. We keep everything clean and have never had issues like this before. The other buckling/wether he’s in with haven’t had any issues, though due to their age we’ve treated everyone each time this guy had problems. His sire is our goat who had really bad mite issues this past winter, so I’m wondering if there is a genetic component. His twin sister looks amazing and is our nicest doeling from this years kid crop, so maybe he got the short end of the genetic stick.

    I’m pretty sure we’re going to wether him at this point. I don’t want to pass on bad genes, especially with a buck.
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Genetics do play a role.
     
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  3. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Is he getting free choice minerals?

    Copper deficiency can cause worm load to explode.

    Do a fecal for cocci and worms.

    If he had cocci when he was younger and it was not treated quickly enough, he may have stomach damage so he cannot absorb nutrients and grow, plus keep weight on.
     
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  4. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    He’s the big belly goat. Free choice minerals always (Purina Wind, Rain, and Storm mixed with Southern States Beef mineral), copper bolused, was on cocci prevention but got it anyway, took him to the vet where said to do longer course for cocci when had dog poo logs again.

    It just seems like it’s one thing after another with him and if this has a genetic component I don’t want to pass it on.
     
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    There is no need to give cocci treatment longer than 5 days.
    Did the vet do a fecal to say it was indeed cocci? Over treatment is not good on the goat if it is not the issue.
    Hard on their rumens.

    If the goat indeed had cocci, using what you have already used wont work, being extended, if it didn't the first time, switching cocci treatment would be a better alternative, if the goat is fecal tested and does have cocci.
     
  6. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Yes, he did the fecal before saying to do the extended treatment. Going to use Corid next time. Was using Albon.
     
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  7. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    If you have any doubt if he should stay intact, then that’s an answer in itself. Hardiness is genetic, and it would be in your herd’s best interest to wether.
     
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  8. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    We’ll wether him. My husband has been thinking that way for a couple weeks now. I want to make sure we’re only breeding strong goats, not breeding known problems. He’s a sweet boy, and quite pretty so he’ll make someone a good weed eater or pet. I won’t put him up for sale until his immune system is stronger though and he’s not having these issues.