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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be freezing up a bunch of milk to bottle feed the Nubian doeling I have reserved (assuming the pair I have reserved from has any) so I don't have to buy any/use replacer, just to be sure I have milk since the doe I was counting on to be in milk hasn't started to come into heat yet this year and I can't be sure she will freshen in time.

I use milk raw and don't usually pasteurize but if I ever do have to sell out I want to be able to say that this doe was raised on CAE prevention methods (her breeder tests extensively for everything, and raises on CAE prevention, she bottle feeds until they are disbudded and have their first shots, then sends them home). I normally dam raise, and last kid I bought from her I didn't have anyone in milk so I used cow milk from the store mixed with replacer.

So, I was wondering if I should pasteurize before or after I freeze it, or if that even matters.

Opinions?
 

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I have found that pastuerizing after freezing works a lot better. Otherwise sometimes the milk separates from the cream in the freezer and you end up with curds after defrosting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have found that pastuerizing after freezing works a lot better. Otherwise sometimes the milk separates from the cream in the freezer and you end up with curds after defrosting it.
That is kind of what I was wondering about. Thanks for the input. I'm thinking it would probably work out best for me anyway to pasteurize as I need it rather than as I save it.
 

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Don't pasteurize. If your breeder and you both are careful about CAE with clean herds you should be fine, right. By pastuerizing aren't you killing off all the good bacteria, antibodies and nutrients. I just don't see how depriving a baby of what nature intended for it to grow and have a healthy future is a good idea. That's the whole point of giving raw milk otherwise you giving nothing more than a glorified replacer weight gainer. But, I've only been doing this for three years so maybe I don't know what I'm talking about.
 

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Any milk used for bottle feeding always should be pasteurized. CL, CAE, and Johne's all can remain dormant without becoming clinical.

Always practice safe prevention for your herd.
 

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Don't pasteurize. If your breeder and you both are careful about CAE with clean herds you should be fine, right. By pastuerizing aren't you killing off all the good bacteria, antibodies and nutrients. I just don't see how depriving a baby of what nature intended for it to grow and have a healthy future is a good idea. That's the whole point of giving raw milk otherwise you giving nothing more than a glorified replacer weight gainer. But, I've only been doing this for three years so maybe I don't know what I'm talking about.
Also, yes it does, to some extent. They make excellent milk additives to reintroduce natural bacteria and nutrients for the babies. I'd much rather pasteurize to ensure my babies' health and well being for longevity and add additives than feed them positive milk.
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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If you plan to pasteurize, do it as you thaw the frozen milk. If possible add to the same amount of fresh milk then pasteurize.

If you are certain of your herd health, then feel free to do as you wish. But unless you are helping manage the other herd, dont trust that someone elses standards are up to your level. Here, we know we have a clean herd but ALWAYS tell our friends who need milk to pasteurize it regardless. It would be hypercritical to suggest otherwise as we tell everyone the same thing as I just mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone!

I actually trust the breeder more than i do my own herd. I dam raise my own kids, but this kid (like the one I bought from the same breeder this spring) will spend the first month at the breeder's home being raised on strict CAE prevention. Her herd is extensively tested for everything under the sun, all goats are G6S normal by testing or parentage, and I have seen the current test results as well as milk and show records myself.

She is a huge investment for my herd and I want to keep her on the CAE prevention until she is weaned. If I ever do have to sell her she will be high enough quality to sell to a home where that will matter and be a selling point. Same as the doe I bought this year. The rest of my goats, while perfect for me and I adore them, are not of the same type of quality. When i sell their kids I am selling to an entirely different market than where these girls and their offspring would be marketed.
 

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I pasteurize right from the milk pail, adding a bit of food coloring so I know which is pasteurized or in case I have to have someone feed in case of an emergency.
 
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