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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When picking a place to camp, what do others look for?

Here are some things I think about when picking a camp site.

1. Try to find a place that's off the beaten path. How many times do you see predator tracks right on the trail when you are hiking? Another advantage to this is that when other people come along the trail with their dogs, you are less likely to have their dogs come into your camp.

2. Don't camp in narrow canyons along the bottom. Other critters moving up or down the canyon will have to come right thru your camp or have to take a long and maybe difficult detour.

3. Don't camp too close to the water. There's a couple of reasons for this. That's where the wild critters will be attracted, where they come to get their water. Another reason is that unless you high-line or hog-tie your goats they will be browsing on brush, little trees, flowers, etc. It's best not to let them eat up things close to a stream. It's the vegetation along the stream banks that keep floods from eroding the banks.

4. I also avoid camping in places where lots of other people camp. They will have already scrounged up all the firewood, their horses may have eaten up the grass and damaged nearby trees, and scavengers like skunks will be used to coming around these places to pick up leftovers and trash.

The ideal place for me is a little bench not too far above a stream, or a little side canyon, where my goats and I can disappear and where nobody else ever camps. The goats can eat things around camp and not damage the stream banks, wild animals and people moving up and down the stream will by pass us, and we will have better safety and privacy.
 

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I normally start by looking for existing fire pits, then choose the one farthest off the path. Well-used camps are that way for a reason, and it is unlikely, unless they are fenced off, that my not camping in it will help it be reclaimed at all. I figure it is better to have one well-used site than a dozen damaged sites in the same area. If the area was pristine, I might do it differently. But we are rarely in one of those.

Since we have started sleeping in hammocks, flat and smooth ground is no longer as important as something to tie to.

Firewood for traditional fires is scarce in a lot of places. Especially when hiking in the snow and in desert areas. With five goats and two people we usually carry a bottle of MAPP gas. We can boil a large camp cup of water in less than a minute with it. So firewood is not all that important to us.
 

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We look for a area where we have as little interaction with people as possible. I like to be within a mile of water and I like to have a fire!!! Most importantly is plenty of grazing for the boys!!! We move around alot to keep the boys well stocked in fresh food!!! Close to hunting grounds if thats what were doing!

And of course a GOOD VIEW!!!
 

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I usually follow a small spring off the main trail to find a suitable place near a water source with suitable browse and trees to high line if necessary. I rarely build a fire unless it is cold or wet out so we leave very little evidence we were ever there afterward. Of course, as my wife likes to point out at every opportunity, we are rarely on trails anyway so we have our pick of spots. Thats why I have the goats. Pick a spot on the map and head in. No trail needed.
 

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Rex,

In your part of Idaho, I thought that you were so remote that...
you had to break a trail to get to town.
the deer asked for directions.
the first rains still haven't made it to the ocean.
your kids are home schooled because you haven't found a public school.
the goats think you're the pets.
and
vegetables are considered weeds.

;-)
 

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Bob Jones said:
Rex,

In your part of Idaho, I thought that you were so remote that...
you had to break a trail to get to town.
the deer asked for directions.
the first rains still haven't made it to the ocean.
your kids are home schooled because you haven't found a public school.
the goats think you're the pets.
and
vegetables are considered weeds.

;-)
Ha ha.... you're not far off. The closest stop light is 70 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rex, you have us beat, re stoplights. Our closest one is 65 miles.

I rarely camp where others have camped, too. I agree with you... that's the whole point of having packgoats.
 
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