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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! My doe Gracie kidded about 10 days ago with a single buckling, so I’ve been milking her (and leaving plenty for the kid) to keep her production up. So far she’s been a great milker and from what I can tell looks to be in perfect, healthy condition. She had trouble getting pregnant her first and second years so we tried Cystorelin, but she miscarried 43 days early. This year we bred her again with cystorelin (and started giving everybody free choice kelp) and she carried full term.

So far, milking had been good but tonight while milking her (we milk twice a day) her milk was pink! The kid (Samson) favors one side so I usually take from the other to relieve pressure, but it never gets super tight because I milk morning and evening. I milked a little late this morning, but she still wasn’t insanely tight and all my other does (2) were perfectly fine.

The side the kid favors was pretty much drained and just had a little regular white milk, but the other side had only pink milk and the color stayed consistent throughout milking. Do you think she just broke a blood vessel? Her Buck kid doesn’t seem like an aggressive nurser but I’m not out there all the time. We have been weaning off 2 doelings (about 6-7 weeks) as well as 10-week old buck/doe twins (long story, normally we wean earlier) and lately they’ve been going to the wrong doe so I’m thinking they may have gone to Gracie and broke an internal blood vessel before she realized they were nursing. I didn’t notice any external damage, and the udder didn’t feel abnormally warm or hot. Gracie behaved perfectly as usual while milking so I don’t think she was in pain.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
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A few things could be.. a broken vessel, low calcium or start of mastitis. I would start with testing for mastitis, start vit c and can give a nice treat of carrot and celery juice for calcium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have no advise for your problem but I do have a question. Why do you wean the kids so early? I’d never wean before 12 weeks. Just curious.
We raise dairy goats and find that the kids can easily eat and digest hay, grass, etc at about 6-7 weeks so we typically wean at 8. 😊 We also do this to prevent damage to the udder. We don’t bottle feed our kids because so far we haven’t had any issues (until yesterday) with them damaging the udders before 8 weeks, but after that they get very aggressive. Our does actually wean their own kids off around 6-7 weeks (Start weaning around 3-5) so we also separate them so they don’t harass their moms. 😁
 
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We raise dairy goats and find that the kids can easily eat and digest hay, grass, etc at about 6-7 weeks so we typically wean at 8. We also do this to prevent damage to the udder. We don’t bottle feed our kids because so far we haven’t had any issues (until yesterday) with them damaging the udders before 8 weeks, but after that they get very aggressive. Our does actually wean their own kids off around 6-7 weeks (Start weaning around 3-5) so we also separate them so they don’t harass their moms.
Ok thank you! I raise meat goats so I keep them on for longer. That’s interesting
 

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We raise dairy here as well but choose to ween no sooner than 12 weeks. Does stay on longer. (Some more frisky bucks may get pulled at 2.5 months) We don't have issue with ruined udders but know it can happen. Even if kids are eating well, we feel they still benefit from milk. Just another difference we can find among goat breeders. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just wanted to update that Gracie's milk has returned to normal and no action was taken. She is doing well now. 😁
 
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