Planning My First Kidding

Discussion in 'Kidding Koral' started by MellonFriend, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    I am trying to plan my first kidding and I wanted to know what you guys think. If you don't know I have two does and two bucks. All are Kinders. Bella and Prim are the does and Phantom and Cullen are the bucks. IMG_4909.JPG IMG_4915.JPG
    IMG_4936.JPG
    I think for the fact that this is my first time doing this, I am going to breed just one of the does and then breed the other in the fall for spring babies. I plan on breeding Bella, the black doe in the first picture to Phantom, the buck on the right in the bottom picture. Bella is the easiest doe to work with and the friendliest with me so I think it would be best to learn with her first and then breed Prim in the fall.

    Timing is something I want to discuss. I want to make sure that I breed Bella for the earliest time that I would want to kid because if the first date doesn't result in a pregnancy then I don't want the due date pushed into cold months. Am I making sense? So I figure the earliest time I would want to kid is August. I am in western NC and last year the temps averaged in the 70s where we live, but the average temperatures tend to be in the low 80s. Last year our September temps were way hotter than usual. We had highs in the high 80s and 90s for most of the month. But the average temps for September are usually in the 70s. Last year we even still saw the mercury rise to 90 degrees in October! We usually have much more mild weather from late August to September but things as you can see have been unpredictable.

    Any thoughts or advice would be helpful. I am getting my vet to come and take a look at my whole herd just as a wellness check and I plan on discussing my plans with her as well, but I would love to hear if any of you had anything to add.
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Are they year round breeders?
     
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  3. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Do consider that hot weather is very hard on very pregnant does. Also, with warm weather - more parasites/worms......
     
  4. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    They are year round breeders. So goatblessings it sounds like you would wait for cooler weather? Here's a question: would you rather deal with late pregnancy in hot weather or cold? Our weather here is so unpredictable. The past few years it seems like it went from summer to winter and skipped fall altogether.
     
  5. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Yes - cooler months are easier on the does. They are carrying extra weight, and their lungs are working harder - so in hot, humid weather, it is harder on them. I also find my kids grow better when they are cold weather kids. Not as many parasites/worms to deal with when they are developing. As far as cold, I'm not sure what your temps are like. I feel very blessed if it's 30 degrees when kids are born. I've done much colder than that, but I stress about getting babies dry and warm in 8 degree temps! I think everyone's weather has gone wacko - I waited to breed last year thinking March would be better than February and then the lovely polar vortex hit. Good luck with your decision!
     
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  6. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    If you're near Asheville and Black Mountain the weather is great for having Feb-March babies. I used to live around there and the worst part of that area isn't the cold, it's the intense rain and soggy grounds. As long as you have a good dry shelter and lots of dry bedding you should be fine. I kidded last year in January, but this year I held off till Feb and I'm thinking (hoping) it'll be better but the weather is getting all wonky right now for everyone so despite the best laid plans it might go out the window if mother nature has her say. DO what's best for your herd. You can adapt and overcome the weather challenges.
     
  7. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    I agree everyone’s weather is a little unpredictable any more. But I do agree that kids born in the winter/ more colder do do better. It is so easy to keep kids warm, just good bedding and make sure their tummy is full and in extreme cold a heat lamp, but it’s not that easy to cool kids off. Pretty much anything you do for a kid to cool them off you risk them getting sick. Same with heavy bred does. A hot doe just wants to lay around and not eat as much which really is not good for a heavy bred late term doe, a lazy doe that is not eating enough to meet the demands of her fetuses is going to end up with pregnancy toxemia. That doesn’t mean every doe that is late term when it’s hot ends up with it but I think it does increase the risk.
    But you do only have one doe. It’s not like you have 20 that your having to watch like a hawk. So if this is what you want to try then try it and if it just doesn’t seem to go perfect then change it up. There are plenty of does in this world that have kidded in August and have been just fine so don’t think I’m saying you are dooming your doe. It just might end up being more work for you and if it is change it next year. I have changed my kidding time a few different times over the last 11 years and I think I’m pretty happy, finally, having early December kids. I think I would be more pleased with having late fall kids before it turns really cold but I do think that is more because i, being cold blooded, would like it more lol
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Springtime kids do the best, they have new growth lush grasses and things to eat. I have mine in February/March.

    Summertime is horribly hot and hard on everyone, flies are horrible when they kid out, they get all over mamma's rear area and the kids are covered with them.
     
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  9. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    Hmm, well I don't really want to wait until next year to kid. I'd rather try to shoot for cooler temps maybe in October or November. I guess I will talk to my vet who will be coming out to do a herd health check and see what she thinks as well. Thanks everyone for the advice.
     
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  10. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  11. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    That would be a good idea. We are all going off our weather and what we have found works for us, so getting a second opinion from someone in your area is not a bad idea ;) and I don’t blame you! I wouldn’t wait till next year either lol
     
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