The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is the virus protected by CDT caught by other goats? Because my goats and I never see any other goats and I'm not getting any new goats. They won't let us touch them with anything in our hand so us giving them CDT ourselves would be impossible. Is it necessary to give them CDT or can I not because they never see any other goats? Please write back ASAP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
I think you are thinking of CL /CAE. You draw blood for those as they are spread goat to goat or goat to soil to goat.

CDT is prevention from bacterial diseases that are not typically spread goat to goat, but just from the environment. Tetanus for example (which is the "T" in CDT)

Some people do choose not to vaccinate at all (Not that I am advocating or not advocating this). If you are breeding it will be much harder to sell without vaccinations and CL/CAE testing.
 

·
city-turned-country girl
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
"The CDT vaccine protects against Clostridium perfringens type C and D and Clostridium tetani (tetanus).

The CDT vaccine is both inexpensive and very effective at preventing the quick and fatal consequences that can result from a clostridial infection. "The key here is vaccination and prevention rather than treatment because usually we are too late to treat it," Gordon says.

Types C and D are the culprits of enterotoxemia. Type C is found around the farm in manure and soil. A young animal may ingest this strain while nursing a doe or ewe with a dirty or contaminated udder. Once inside the body, the bacteria grow rapidly and produce a toxin that results in rapid death.

Type D is the clostridial strain tied to overeating disease. While certain levels exist in the stomach, bacteria can proliferate in the small intestine when fast-growing lambs or kids ingest large amounts of feed, grain specifically. These toxins then enter the bloodstream, and the animal responds with body convulsions, jerky movements, salivation and coma. Death can occur in as little as 30 to 90 minutes.

When it comes to tetanus, wounds and lacerations are a conduit for the deadly bacteria to infect the body with deadly toxins. While puncture wounds incurred from in and around facilities are one way tetanus can infect the animal, surgical procedures like castration, docking and dehorning can also present a risk."

http://www.agriview.com/news/livest...cle_ea6e3adc-8cb5-11e2-a048-001a4bcf887a.html
 

·
city-turned-country girl
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
I think you are thinking of CL /CAE. You draw blood for those as they are spread goat to goat or goat to soil to goat.

Some people do choose not to vaccinate at all (Not that I am advocating or not advocating this). If you are breeding it will be much harder to sell without vaccinations and CL/CAE testing.
Yes, it is a very good practice to draw blood yearly to test for CL & CAE. I do not vaccinate for CL, and neither does anyone I know, but I won't consider doing business with any breeder who has CL or CAE in their herd.

Is the virus protected by CDT caught by other goats? Because my goats and I never see any other goats and I'm not getting any new goats. They won't let us touch them with anything in our hand so us giving them CDT ourselves would be impossible. Is it necessary to give them CDT or can I not because they never see any other goats? Please write back ASAP
If you keep a closed herd, you shouldn't have a problem with CL or CAE. If you ever visit a diseased herd, please wash your hands, change your clothes, & bleach your shoes before caring for or entering the pen of your own animals.

You say your goats won't let you touch them with anything in your hand? How long have you had them? They will learn to trust you more if you keep them in a smaller pen (if they are in a huge pasture), feed them treats, and spend more time handling them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"The CDT vaccine protects against Clostridium perfringens type C and D and Clostridium tetani (tetanus).

The CDT vaccine is both inexpensive and very effective at preventing the quick and fatal consequences that can result from a clostridial infection. "The key here is vaccination and prevention rather than treatment because usually we are too late to treat it," Gordon says.

Types C and D are the culprits of enterotoxemia. Type C is found around the farm in manure and soil. A young animal may ingest this strain while nursing a doe or ewe with a dirty or contaminated udder. Once inside the body, the bacteria grow rapidly and produce a toxin that results in rapid death.

Type D is the clostridial strain tied to overeating disease. While certain levels exist in the stomach, bacteria can proliferate in the small intestine when fast-growing lambs or kids ingest large amounts of feed, grain specifically. These toxins then enter the bloodstream, and the animal responds with body convulsions, jerky movements, salivation and coma. Death can occur in as little as 30 to 90 minutes.

When it comes to tetanus, wounds and lacerations are a conduit for the deadly bacteria to infect the body with deadly toxins. While puncture wounds incurred from in and around facilities are one way tetanus can infect the animal, surgical procedures like castration, docking and dehorning can also present a risk."

http://www.agriview.com/news/livest...cle_ea6e3adc-8cb5-11e2-a048-001a4bcf887a.html
Thank you! Very helpful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think you are thinking of CL /CAE. You draw blood for those as they are spread goat to goat or goat to soil to goat.

CDT is prevention from bacterial diseases that are not typically spread goat to goat, but just from the environment. Tetanus for example (which is the "T" in CDT)

Some people do choose not to vaccinate at all (Not that I am advocating or not advocating this). If you are breeding it will be much harder to sell without vaccinations and CL/CAE testing.
Thank you! Very helpful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, it is a very good practice to draw blood yearly to test for CL & CAE. I do not vaccinate for CL, and neither does anyone I know, but I won't consider doing business with any breeder who has CL or CAE in their herd.

If you keep a closed herd, you shouldn't have a problem with CL or CAE. If you ever visit a diseased herd, please wash your hands, change your clothes, & bleach your shoes before caring for or entering the pen of your own animals.

You say your goats won't let you touch them with anything in your hand? How long have you had them? They will learn to trust you more if you keep them in a smaller pen (if they are in a huge pasture), feed them treats, and spend more time handling them!
I've had them for about a year. They let me hold them (very painfully. They weigh 70lbs) but won't let me touch under their stomachs, but I can open their mouth, eyelids, and ears. They trust me very much, but not under their stomachs or armpits. Thanks! I will definitely take your advice to hand feed them treats and grain. Aspen (one of my two ND does) lets me hold her leg and shake it lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
http://fiascofarm.com/ is a very respected goat resource and I know they choose not to vaccinate but do administer alot of extra supplements/ holistic remedies to build immune systems etc.

However,if you are choosing to not vaccinate due to their fear of things being in your hand...I would suggest working on that slowly over time because if something does happen to one of them and you HAVE to give them something to save them... the stress it will ad because they have never had to deal with you coming at them with something may make a bad situation worse.

EDIT: I just saw your most recent post, it sounds like you are on the right track... I would just keep doing what you are doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
http://fiascofarm.com/ is a very respected goat resource and I know they choose not to vaccinate but do administer alot of extra supplements/ holistic remedies to build immune systems etc.

However,if you are choosing to not vaccinate due to their fear of things being in your hand...I would suggest working on that slowly over time because if something does happen to one of them and you HAVE to give them something to save them... the stress it will ad because they have never had to deal with you coming at them with something may make a bad situation worse.

EDIT: I just saw your most recent post, it sounds like you are on the right track... I would just keep doing what you are doing.
Thanks :) You all make the goat part of my life so much less stressful!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
82,257 Posts
I catch the goat first, tie them up, then bring out the needle to inject the vaccine ect.
Never let them see you coming out with it and try to catch them with it in hand, they will run.
Goats are smart they hate shots just like you and me.

If I have to tie up one back leg so they don't jump around too much while giving the shot, I do so.

CD&T is important to give IMO. Goats get scratches, pokes, or stickers ect which can cause tetanus.
Over eating disease can happen as well. If any of these strike, it can be devastating without being vaccinated.
They do not need to be near other goats to have these issues arise.

CL, can be brought in by others on their shoes ect. Some give the vaccine, but the goats seem to break out with it after given, which is scary. They will test a low positive.

CAE is caught by an infected goats milk.
 

·
Certified Codger
Joined
·
418 Posts
After losing a goat to Tetanus last year, I'm a believer in CDT vaccine. We've had NO problems with sick goats since vaccinating last September.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
479 Posts
If you ever lose a kid to enterotoxemia you will not entertain the notion of not giving CDT shots again. Its a nasty disease and very easy to prevent but very difficult to treat even if you know the symptoms. They will be in great pain after eating and convulse and die and you are powerless to stop it. I would advise get someone to help you by holding the goat while you administer the shots. Use a small 1/2" 20 gauge needle that just goes beneath the skin so you can stab and give the dose fast even if they are rambunctious and hard to hold. You may regret it if you avoid it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,606 Posts
I lost only one animal to enterotoxemia and she was a doe that was vaccinated so don't think it's 100%
I vaccinate AND keep the antitoxin on hand. But after her I'm not totally sold on the vaccine like I was before
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you ever lose a kid to enterotoxemia you will not entertain the notion of not giving CDT shots again. Its a nasty disease and very easy to prevent but very difficult to treat even if you know the symptoms. They will be in great pain after eating and convulse and die and you are powerless to stop it. I would advise get someone to help you by holding the goat while you administer the shots. Use a small 1/2" 20 gauge needle that just goes beneath the skin so you can stab and give the dose fast even if they are rambunctious and hard to hold. You may regret it if you avoid it.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
I've had them for about a year. They let me hold them (very painfully. They weigh 70lbs) but won't let me touch under their stomachs, but I can open their mouth, eyelids, and ears. They trust me very much, but not under their stomachs or armpits. Thanks! I will definitely take your advice to hand feed them treats and grain. Aspen (one of my two ND does) lets me hold her leg and shake it lol
Good advice given. Typically the vaccine is given under the skin near the withers so you wouldn't have to touch bellies or pits to give it if that makes it sound more doable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Good advice given. Typically the vaccine is given under the skin near the withers so you wouldn't have to touch bellies or pits to give it if that makes it sound more doable.
Thanks! When we brought my old goats (they got eaten by dogs) to get shots from a friend of ours that's big in goats, he said to give the CDT behind the armpit. Was he wrong? Or are there two different ways you can give the shots safely?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
There are many ways you can give them... Pretty much anywhere you can tent the skin. People choose different spots because it's more convenient, or abscesses are less noticeable, etc.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top